Projects Learning & Experienced

rated by 0 users
This post has 36 Replies | 7 Followers

Top 150 Contributor
Female
Posts 687
Points 13,085

Caryl Anne, not sure where I found that material, but love the greens and the buttons were just perfect.  I think it was only a fat quarter though, as I didn't have enough to do the zipper bag in a larger size.  I love your sewing cover! I make them for the FWs that we sell and always am on the look out for cute material to make them with. 

Michelle B
Enjoy family, friends and hobbies

 

  • Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Female
Posts 962
Points 19,541

Finally got my rooster done.  I don't think my hoop grips good enough to hold the fabric.  This rooster didn't show any puckers in the hoop but out there are toooo many.  Anyway I just love him.  I posted the pictures in Media.

 A bed without a quilt is like a sky without stars.

Patty Mc  

Oregon & Arizona

  • Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Female
Posts 52
Points 845

Michelle, I to am a new owner of a Viking Ruby.  I just went to a class on 5D and I walked out almost as confused as I went in.  I had a Sapphire but upgraded to a Ruby this year because the dealer said "it is so much easier to use"..blah blah blah and I fell for it.  I have tried a couple of embroidery patterns.  The first daffodil turned out wonderful.  So decided to do some more to put in a quilt.  Well 2 wasted tries later, I just gave up.  I'm so frustrated.  We moved last August and I have yet to find my USB stick and other dongals.  Since you have had yours since January, do you have any tips for me?  I can use all the help I can get.

Thanks

Robin, Snohomish WA

  • Post Points: 20
Top 150 Contributor
Female
Posts 687
Points 13,085
Michelle replied on Sun, Apr 28 2013 11:17 PM

Robin,  I don't think I ever responded to your question on the Viking? I have a Viking also and just finished the first 3 classes for new users.  I had a small Brother machine that did embroidery and had just started understanding a few things on how to load a pattern or design into the machine and do a few changes on it. But that machine was very small and only did 4x4 size patterns.  So my husband bought this larger machine.  I am just starting to get the hang of it.  I signed up for embroidery classes at the shop once a month. These classes are designed to come home with a project, but really to learn more about the embroidery process that the machine will do. I am finding this helps the most.  I am learning what all the "symbols" stand for on the screen.  That seems to be the hardest for me.  I always come home from the class and do one more of the same project at home, so I can look at my notes while still fresh in my mind and that way I can reorganize my notes to make sense.  I have been making a notebook of all the projects, take a few pictures to go with that and then try to use the new technique in another project on a quilt top.  It's only been 2 full classes plus the initial users classes.  But I am getting better. I do make aprons that I put embroidery on as well, so that keeps  me using the machine on a weekly basis.  I just bought another pattern this week at a quilt retreat that uses applique to make cowboy boots on block and then add these to a quilt top.  So that will be another program to put on the laptop that has a few more patterns on it.  I also go to freeembroidery designs.com to download free designs on a weekly basis.  That website lets you get 3 free designs a week.  I didn't want to get too many and not use them, so I just get a few at a time and try to play with it as much as possible.  Oh, the classes also give you someone to ask questions about stabilizers as that is new to me. The other students are usually new and I like meeting new people in this process.  Have fun!!  I will try to post a pic of the first applique we did and a close up of the aprons I make. .   

Michelle B
Enjoy family, friends and hobbies

 

  • Post Points: 20
Not Ranked
Female
Posts 52
Points 845

Michelle, those are darling aprons and potholder.  I have made a few projects.  I guess the most problems I am having is the computer and 5D.  At 58 my mind isn't as sharp as it once was and I was never a whiz on the computer.  When I went to the 5D class, my laptop froze and wouldn't start up so I was behind from the beginning.  She finally let me use their laptop, but by then I had no idea where I was.  I didn't get to finish my project and she said she would email me the project.  Well, I still haven't gotten it.  So I will call tomorrow.  I need to start with projects that are preloaded already and leave 5D alone for awhile.  My main problem so far seems to be the threading of the machine correctly.  I can get one square done then the next one screws up.  It's frustrating.  I know I just have to practice more.  I can take the classes as many times as I want.  I think I will do that.  Wish I had someone who could just sit down with me and run me through everything.  I'm finding it hard to learn in a big class with 10 different sewing machines.  How can you learn like that?  I think they should do one brand at a time. 

Robin-Snohomish, WA

  • Post Points: 20
Top 150 Contributor
Female
Posts 687
Points 13,085
Michelle replied on Mon, Apr 29 2013 9:58 AM

Robin,  yes, they were talking about the 5D program when I was in the class also.  She is wanting to sell the upgraded version of course, but I wanted to learn the machine and do the basics on making a design for now. Then I will learn more on how to change the design.  I am sort of understanding that these programs really are how you change up a design, put letters around it, maybe change the stitches in the design, etc. I may be wrong as I haven't had anyone really explain why one software program is better than another.  I would think, ease of use, user friendly, etc, is why I would buy one program over another.  If I want to invest that much money into a software program, I will play around with several at these demo classes before deciding on the one that I want with features I want.  It would have to be up-gradable instead of just one program.  I also want the menus easy to understand. I sort of relate it to power point or Microsoft Office, its just a program and you have to use it to really learn all the ways you can make your slides or work. Does that make sense?  I think that 5D program is just very basic on the Viking and you have to upgrade to the more expensive one to do all the designing work.  

  I still like just downloading the free embroidery designs as someone else has done all the work.  I would have to be doing it more as a daily business before I started making alot of changes on each design or making my own designs.  

I do find it hard when they are trying to show a project with several different versions of the machines there in the class.  The last class, we had only  different people and everyone had a slightly different version of the Viking. So she kept saying, "Ok on this machine you can do this, but not on your machine."  Don't know how that could be changed thou as people buy at different times.  Definitely, the support you get in the store is the most important thing and I have researched this aspect around here in the San Antonio area.  Its more important than the brand of machine! I am wondering, after going to a quilter's retreat this last weekend, and learning so much from other quilters, if there are any embroidery retreats?  That would be a great idea to get ladies together in a relaxed manner and learn from each other. Even if you had an instructor that was one of the students that really had the program down pretty good, they could help the others in a whole day.  It sure was fun this last week! 

 

Michelle B
Enjoy family, friends and hobbies

 

  • Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
Female
Posts 2,221
Points 41,055
Donna B replied on Mon, May 13 2013 10:05 PM

Michelle, what a great idea about having an "embroidery retreat"!  I would love that!!!  I wonder if we have enough interest within QCA to have a QCA Machine-Embroidery Retreat?  Of course, with that type of retreat you would really need your own machine and embroidery module...so flying would be out of the question.  Something to think about though...

I just attended a 2 day digitizing workshop taught by Claudia Dinnell using the Bernina Version 6 software. She is a magnificent digitizer, and a talented teacher with the patience of job.  I am continually amazed that she is able to handle a class of 20-25 students from rank beginners to advanced - without skipping a beat...even with repeated questions!

I did learn a lot, but boy was it intense..and for me, at times, somewhat overwhelming!  But by the end of the workshop, I had to admit that I actually came into it knowing more than I thought I did. I just lacked the confidence to use the knowledge I had.  I also learned how to do several things that I had read about, but just didn't understand until I saw it demonstrated!!!  Another visual learner here...lol!

My friend and I both use this software and have Bernina 830 machines, but if someone was well versed in their own software commands, they could benefit from Claudia's workshops and the expertise she brings to the subject...even though the examples are done with the Bernina V6 software.  There were several in the class using other software that seemed to be doing fine.  (I think they were more experience than me, but don't know for sure.)

And, as you mentioned, the key to learning the embroidery software is to use it regularly...and practice, practice, practice!  It's just like anything else (including FMQ), if you don't practice regularly you will lose the skills and certainly not advance in your skills.  Claudia brought this up at the end of the class...that you need to go home and go through the workbook and the drills we learned to reinforce the information in your brain.  Then practice, practice, practice!

 Winthrop, WA

 

  • Post Points: 5
Page 3 of 3 (37 items) Prev123
| RSS
Have a Question? | About Us | Privacy Policy | Join Today © 2014 F+W All rights reserved.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use