Have you every made a CQ using.....

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Louise Posted: Fri, Dec 2 2011 2:50 PM

What I would like to know has any every made one using
brocades, oriental silks, velvets etc fabric?

Would a foundation fabric be needed when using these
kinds of fabrics?

Are they machine washable? or would it be best to dry clean
only?

What would be a good size to make?


Any other valuable information would be great.


I have been collecting fabrics like this for a few years and
someday I HOPE to make one, but I am scared of ruining
my fabrics.

Thanks in advance for any replies.

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Hi Louise,

I am still new to this but will answer as I can from what I have learned so far ....

Louise:
What I would like to know has any every made one using
brocades, oriental silks, velvets etc fabric?

The two projects I have been working on have a combination of these fabrics and some cotton.  You can mix them up however you want.

Louise:
Are they machine washable? or would it be best to dry clean
only?

I would not consider machine washing as the agitation of the washer may damage some of your fabrics and embellishments. Dry cleaning is also not a good option if you use beads, sequins, some buttons also don't take to chemicals. A gentle Hand washing is best. You can test small pieces of your fabrics for waterfastness.

 

Louise:
What would be a good size to make?

I think  a 10 to 12 inch block is a good size to showcase several fabrics, and give you some decent size areas to embellish.

Louise:
I have been collecting fabrics like this for a few years and
someday I HOPE to make one, but I am scared of ruining
my fabrics.
  

 

Why not do a practice using cotton first? They're easy to handle for a beginning block.

Louise:
Would a foundation fabric be needed when using these
kinds of fabrics?
.

Definitely. Usually muslin is used. You need to use something that is easy to "needle".The foundation helps support your stitches and keeps the fabrics from being stressed as you hoop.

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I forgot to add in the BLOG section, Linny has done some wonderful tutorials and links for us. I don't know if you have had time to check them out.

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Robin replied on Sat, Dec 3 2011 7:38 AM

Louise,

Stephanie has given you some great advice.  The only thing I would say is try anything that you think will work because it has been my experience this is a dive in take a chance and see what happens kind of thing.   I love the freedom that it gives me and I also love that it allows me to use other skills that I haven't had the chance to use in a long time like embroidery.   There is also an amazing since of freedom with crazy quilt that I have not found in piecing and patching.

Robin

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Joyce A replied on Sun, Dec 4 2011 4:05 PM

These are my favorite fabrics. I love the Victorian look. I wet the fabric well with hot water. If the color in a fabric starts to bleed when it hits the water it immediately goes in the garbage, no matter how pretty it is. I spin the pieces of fabric in the washer and then dry them in the dryer.  After all that I feel comfortable in saying the finished product is hand washable and it won't shrink and the colors won't run. I've sometimes prewashed cotton lace and trim if it seems they might shrink.  Have fun!

Joyce

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Thanks for the great idea Joyce. I can't think of anything more disappointing than to go to such hard work and have it bleed together down the road. I just thought of something else. There is a product called Retayne that can be washed with fabrics to keep them from bleeding. A lot of people use that if they haven't prewashed fabrics when they make a quilt. 

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Linny t replied on Tue, Dec 6 2011 11:54 AM

Hi, and welcome, Louise.  I don't know how I missed this post.  Traditional Victorian crazy quilting was done with leftovers from clothing and home use fabrics, which in the Victorian day were sometimes silk and brocaide.  Any fabric you want is okay, just as long as you are willing to work with it.  By this I mean you should consider your embellishments, too.  The fabric as well as the embellishment materials you choose will determine if you should wash or dry clean.  A foundation is used and it is commonly a muslin.  This is what stabilizes the patches in your quilt which are usually oddly shaped with some or all edges on bias.  When choosing your foundation, you should consider how strong it needs to be, not only based on the fabrics you use, but also on the embellishments.

For a first time you might consider using cotton scraps and practicing.  You could just make a trivet or something small, just to see if you like it.  This will give you confidence before chopping up your fancy fabrics. 

Check out the tutorials in the Blog sectionand the links file in the Pages section of this group.  Have fun with this!  It is liberating fiber art and anything goes.  That's why we love it so much.  Don't be afraid to ask questions, either.  The people in this group love to help and learn together.

Linny T

 

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Diane replied on Wed, Dec 7 2011 9:57 AM

Welcome Louise to our fun and crazy group!

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