Emailed Pearl from P3 Designs

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Annie Posted: Fri, Apr 20 2012 7:43 AM

After I purchased Pearl's DVD on her appliqué technique, I realized she used to manage my LQS.  I emailed her to tell her how useful her DVD was.  I mentioned our group and she emailed back and said she was wondering why all of a sudden there was a larger than normal request for the Wildflowers pattern.  Her wildflowers quilt is out "on the road" but will return to the quilt shop by the end of the month.  Cant wait to see it, I'll take pictures and post it.

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Sheila replied on Fri, Apr 20 2012 9:45 AM

Annie:

After I purchased Pearl's DVD on her appliqué technique, I realized she used to manage my LQS.  I emailed her to tell her how useful her DVD was.  I mentioned our group and she emailed back and said she was wondering why all of a sudden there was a larger than normal request for the Wildflowers pattern.  Her wildflowers quilt is out "on the road" but will return to the quilt shop by the end of the month.  Cant wait to see it, I'll take pictures and post it.

LOL - Isn't that funny!

 

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gini replied on Mon, Apr 23 2012 12:07 PM

i did e-mail pearl a few months ago to make sure the pattern would be available if the members want to get it in the future.   i let her know that there would be quite a few of us participating.  i didn't anticipate loving her needles so much.  i hope she has a good supply of them on hand, because i highly recommend them.

gini in north idaho

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Annie replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 7:30 AM

Gini,

I too ordered her needles, but don't have anything to compare them to since I just started appliqué.  Can you tell me what makes them good, iyho??

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gini replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 10:39 AM

oh ,dear, unfortunately i don't have humble opinions.  i have obnoxious ones, firm ones, well you get the idea.   

applique needles.    they are thinner and sharper than regular needles.  and a bit longer.

  then you have milliners needles, half again as long as an applique needle, and thinner, yet still very sharp.    as soon as i discovered milliners needles or straw needles i switched over because you have more control over the needle, it acts as a long skinny finger.   these were developed for hat makers.  jeane kimball of foxglove cottage makes a good straw needle.

   next i discovered the bohin brand of applique needle.  not quite as long as a straw needle, a teensy bit thicker, making them stronger, but still very sharp.   the straw needles tend to bend.

when i explored the p3 site, i saw pearl had her own brand.  she does beautiful work and specializes in applique.  it's good to try out new products.   i love her needles. they seem to be slicker.   they are very similar to the bohin, but slide through the material more smoothly, and the bohins are very smooth.

one of the comments i got during applique lessons at retreat, was how much difference having a better needle made to their applique stitch.

and while i am on the topic of needles.    did you know that a needle eye has two sides?   some of the appliquers hadn't heard this tidbit.   the eye of the needle is punched out.   that makes the under side of the eye rougher and harder to thread.  the top where the punch enters the needle is more rounded.   if you are having trouble threading your needle turn it over and thread from the other side.   you will almost always be able to thread, easily, from the right side.

gini in north idaho

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Barbara replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 12:46 PM

Gini, thanks alot for all this great info on needles  it really is helpful when you are looking for good brands of applique needles Barbara

Liberty,Missouri

EAT!! SLEEP !! QUILT!!

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Sheila replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 2:30 PM

Gini - Great tips on the needles! I guess I thought needles were made using a "mold" method but, either way, now that I think about it, it makes sense that there would be a right & wrong side to the eye!

 

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Nana replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 3:12 PM

Gini

I did know that there was a "right" side to the eye of a needle and have frequently turned my needle over when having trouble threading.  But it had been so long since I learned this tidbit that I had forgotten why I turned my needle over.....ROFLOL

Vinton, Virginia

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Lillie replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 5:43 PM

Nana:

Gini

I did know that there was a "right" side to the eye of a needle

I totally did not know there is a right and wrong side of the eye. It's nice to learn something new.

northern colorado

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gini replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 6:20 PM

sheila, i think needles are made by drawing out a long thin piece of metal, then cut ground and polished to a point.  another metal  coating is then put on the needle to make it slicker. i'll have to go look this all up, i might be making it up.  

here is an interesting article, i was close to right.

" In the 20th century, more than 20 steps were taken to manufacture an
enormous variety of sewing needle, for hands and machines. Needles are
made two at a time, from coils of steel wire. The wire is straightened
and cut to the length of two. Through a grinding process, points are
formed at both ends. Using a grindstone, the needle is turned
repeatedly until the point is fine and even.

[...]

Next, the eyes are stamped into the wire near the middle; two flat
areas are stamped first, with the perfectly sized eyes punched through
by another machine. Another piece of wire is drawn through the holes
(like dental floss after a cleaning) so when the needle wire is cut
apart, two needles remain, hanging from the wire. Their heads are
smoothed and rounded. Their bodies are checked for straightness,
tempered for toughness, and polished for smoothness."

gini in north idaho

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Annie replied on Tue, Apr 24 2012 11:51 PM

Wow Gini way to go. How can any one person know so much about needles?

Thanks for the lesson. I have learned a ton 

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