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Spray Basting

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Cathy-B-Quiltin posted on Sun, Aug 29 2010 6:50 AM

How do you baste your quilts??

I usually put mine on the kitchen floor then have to crawl around pinning it. I am not as young as I used to be and it is starting to become a chore.

I watched a video yesterday where a lady puts hers on the wall and uses 505 Basting Spray. It looked so much easier and she said it works wonderfully!!

Have any of you ever tried this?

** Give Me The Simple Life **

Cathy-B-Quiltin

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Suggested by aunt bb

I sandwiched my Quilt for Kids today and sprayed it.....(I don't like using tha spray) Then I tried nana's advice and ironed the front and back. It seems nice and flat and I'm crossing my fingers no puckers anywhere!  I'm going to look into the fusible batting that Pat recommended, too.

North of Boston MA

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Nana replied on Tue, Sep 21 2010 4:03 PM

Diane

I tried fusible batting and didn't like it.  It felt stiff and stayed very flat.....even after washing.

Vinton, Virginia

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Thea replied on Tue, Sep 21 2010 4:48 PM

diane - Hobbs makes a nice one that is fusible batting - I tried it once but the cost is too high for me - almost twice what a normal batting will cost. 

 

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Thanks Nana andThea~

I was just looking online and it is real expensive. I'll probably just use spray or pin or a little of both. I actually enjoy pinning. And besides, with all these new things on the market, the old actual art of quilting will be gone before we know it. You have to leave somethings for the human to do.

Time for dinner here and then I get to quilt tonight on the Quilt for Kids. yeah! I'll be back later.

 

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My husband works at a Church and a now closed school as a custodian.  So I just let him know when and he sets up a couple of tables and my sister and i lay and tape down the backing and then spray baste half a quilt at a time.  We love the spray baste technique.  Just have to carefully lay back each layer.  My husband says that a quick wipe up is all that is needed.  Told me there is no problem on cleanup.  Also, a church hall is plenty big so fumes are not an issue.  And you want to go lightly with this stuff.  I hand quilt (actually I am a stab stitcher) and have no problem needling thru it.  Be careful when you are working half at a time that you do not overspray the overlap or that will be an area tough to get thru(I know this from experience), but overall, works great.  It takes a while to hand quilt a project and I love that I can handle the quilt a lot and the material does not shift at all.  That was a problem i had whether I basted or safety pinned the quilt before i discovered the spray baste. 

Pat

 

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It may seem expensive, but a little goes a long way.  You only need a light spray.  It washes out wonderfully.  And I have even pulled parts up and re stuck them sort of like a post it note.

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Patti replied on Fri, Sep 24 2010 9:44 AM

I like the spray basting on smaller projects.  Bed size I still prefer to pin.

Patti

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I saw the fusbile bamboo batting at the Hancock's booth at a sewing expo in March.  It is very thin, expensive and the sample piece the lady gave me came apart by the time I got home.  I don't know if it was because it was charm sized or what but I need my sandwich to stay together longer than that.  With the spray baste, I have never had a problem with it coming apart before I finished quilting.   

Marge (AKA Dimples)

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mars92 replied on Mon, Sep 27 2010 12:34 AM

I love spray basting!  Its so much easier than hundreds of quilting pins.  I don't spray heavily and just do a section at a time before moving on to the next section when I am actually "basting" a quilt..  I am careful when quilting to check every now and than to ensure everything is ok on the back of the quilt also.  I have found spray basting so much easier but you need to know the spray basting product itself is not inexpensive, so I do try to get it on sale whenever possible. I hope this helps you.

Marlene from Arizona

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Janey replied on Mon, Nov 15 2010 12:31 PM

I have used spray basting before and for smaller quilts I use the kitchen table with lots of freezer paper all around.  The over spray really makes a mess.  I am interested to hear other views on using the wall, I have never tried it.

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when doing lap size or wall hangings I always use spray baste.  So far I've not had a problem not pinng.  I say go for it.

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Sylvia replied on Mon, Nov 15 2010 5:55 PM

I use spray basting all the time, forget all those pins, takes too long and hurts the hands. Depending on the size of the quilt I usually use the floor to spray the glue then onto the DR table to make sure all is straight, smooth and ready to go. Basting spray is the easiest, cannot imagine using a wall.

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Donna replied on Mon, Nov 15 2010 6:48 PM

I've tried it twice so far and I am still on the fence.  The first time was a very small quilt and I could do it on a table. I forgot to mask the table so there was overspray - but it cleaned up very nicely.  The odor lingered a little longer than I was happy about and I had windows open.   The second time it was a larger wall hanging and I hung it on a wall in the garage (the only space with enough wall space and proper ventilation).  It went very fast and I was very happy with it as I usually stretch between wood bars and then hand baste with needle and thread.   But after the first bit of stitching the backing seemed to be moving around too much and had almost puckered.  In a panic I quickly hand basted it.    So I either didn't spray enough or hadn't stretched the backing enough when I first hung it on the wall.  Also I don't have a lot of time to quilt so it can sit for weeks before I get back to it.   So I have a couple of questions - do you stretch the backing when hanging it on the wall?  How do you know if you have sprayed enough? And how long does it actually last?

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Nana replied on Mon, Nov 15 2010 6:56 PM

I press my quilt sandwich front and back after spraying.  It seems to activate the spray and it holds better.  I have never had problems with it turning loose.  I do spray fairly heavy though.

Vinton, Virginia

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Jean replied on Tue, Nov 16 2010 3:33 PM

I tried the spray basting method on my table.  It worked very well, just have to be patient and get it completely tight.  However, I'm not real happy with the stiff feel of the quilt after getting done with the quilting.  But then again I loved being able to freee motion with no pins to remove.

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