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Spray Basting

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Cathy-B-Quiltin posted on Sun, Aug 29 2010 6:50 AM

How do you baste your quilts??

I usually put mine on the kitchen floor then have to crawl around pinning it. I am not as young as I used to be and it is starting to become a chore.

I watched a video yesterday where a lady puts hers on the wall and uses 505 Basting Spray. It looked so much easier and she said it works wonderfully!!

Have any of you ever tried this?

** Give Me The Simple Life **

Cathy-B-Quiltin

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gini:
i do it the way nana does.  start in the middle and smooth to the end, turn it around and smooth to the other end.  most of the time i spray batt and smooth the back on,  then flip and spray the batt and smooth on the top.  I work in a row at a time.  about 1 to 1 1/2  feet, spray it, smooth it, then move the entire quilt down and do the next twelve inches    gini

I like the idea of laying down the batt first. I do mine on two large tables together. I can never seem to get the backing fabric tight enough with no tucks.This way I would be flattening the backing and seeing what's going on. I do it in half sections, too.

Gini~ when you flip the batt and back over, it stays together o.k.?

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SLICK!!!!  I will never pin again!

Prelude:  My F&P design wall was already hanging via Command hooks.

Step 1, below: Using blue painter's tape, I added a border of newspaper around the design wall to catch any excess spray.

Step 2: I hung the backing wrong side out - it clings to the felt of the design wall, but I reinforced with tacks along the top to support the coming weight of all three layers, and then pulled taut and held it with more blue painters tape.

Step 3: I sprayed the upper third of the backing fabric with 505, and then stuck the batting to that and smoothed with my hands.  Then I needed to drape the bottom 2/3 of batting over me as I continued spraying and smoothing as I worked my way down.  (no problem with fumes as I was wearing a mask and had an open window and fan blowing nearby)

Step 4: Because I wanted to line up the one pieced circle on the back with the center circle on the front, I used safety pins to match those, and then smoothed the entire top to the batting to make sure all sides were lining up correctly.  Then I pulled the top half down to the safety pins, sprayed the batting, and smoothed it back up.  Then I took the safety pins off and repeated with the bottom half. DH came to check on me at that point.

I think it looks good, and I can't wait to start my free motion quilting.  It was certainly much, much quicker than pinning.  When I'm done, I'll report on the whether or not I get puckers on the back.

Thanks for sharing this idea, Cathy!  I like it!


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Nana replied on Mon, Sep 6 2010 3:42 PM

Nancy

Looks great.   I like the way you attached it to your wall.  Great idea.

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I'm tall, but it did still require a short step stool to reach the top.  It's an 8-foot wall, so you can see that a really large quilt won't work this way.


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Nancy~

Gorgeous quilt, too! Handsome DH checking to see if you survived! Too cute.

North of Boston MA

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Kris replied on Mon, Sep 6 2010 4:58 PM

Nancy,

fantastic tutorial. You did a nice job of it and I'm betting it was much easier than crawling around on the floor. Also saves the hands from opening and closing a few bazillion safety pins.

I wish I had that much space for a design wall. *sigh*

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Marie replied on Mon, Sep 6 2010 7:10 PM

Nana:
I personally like to press both sides of mine to make sure I get all the wrinkles out

 

Nana, do you iron both sides after you have spray basted all layers together?

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Nana replied on Mon, Sep 6 2010 7:35 PM

Marie:
Nana, do you iron both sides after you have spray basted all layers together?

 

Marie

Yes I do.   I like to iron it after spray basting so that all the wrinkles are pressed out.   I also think the basting spray seems to hold better after I iron the quilt sandwich.

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Nancy,

Thank you for taking the time to make this wonderful tutorial. It's good to see that a larger quilt can be done by using the wall system and that you were able to accomplish it by yourself. I think you will be amazed at how much easier it is to quilt without having to worry about removing pins everytime you turn around. I didn't have any problems with puckers doing a queen size, but I did check from time to time on the back to avoid any potential problems. Best of luck quilting your beautiful quilt and thanks again for all your effforts.  

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gini replied on Mon, Sep 6 2010 9:18 PM

nancy great turorial and the quilt is wonderful  thanks     gini

gini in north idaho

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Marie replied on Tue, Sep 7 2010 8:42 AM

Nana:
I like to iron it after spray basting so that all the wrinkles are pressed out.   I also think the basting spray seems to hold better after I iron the quilt sandwich.

 

Thanks Nana, I'll keep that in mind and give it a try.

Coupons always make me smile and the store smiles because I buy so much because of them.  LOL

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Thea replied on Tue, Sep 7 2010 11:31 AM

Nancy,  Great tutorial, I don't have a wall large enough to hang most of my quilts(the shame of me making such big quilts) so I use the pool table with boards over the top of it... i lay my backing down and use clips to hold it taut... then I lay the batting on... I have found that it works much better if you spray the backing and not the batting... I smooth that out and move so all is spary basted before I put the top piece on...

I like Nana - press mine to get all the wrinkles out... then I return it to the table and clip down again and lay the top on - I fold the top back in quarters and spray the top - then carefull fold it into place... - I press each section on top of the pool table before I move to the next section...

not sure why but I think that heat helps to activate the adhesive...  I do make sure it is all sprayed down though...

I normally use sullivan's spray but recently got some Taylors - will let you know how I like it once I use it... I did though get some more sullivans at JoAnn's... a friend was going to the city and picked it up for me - so all set if Taylor's doesn't work...

I have several quilts ready for spray basting and need to get them done... hoping that some day soon I will be out of this flare and have the strength to do them...

also thought about asking DH when he gets the walk - in closet done and brings my food storage in from the garage to there that maybe that wall can be made into a design wall for spray basting my quilts like you did... wonder what he will say when I start taking over his garage...eeek....

 

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Answered (Not Verified) Pat replied on Tue, Sep 21 2010 12:14 PM
Suggested by Diane Morgan

I have done a lot of spray basting.  I started with quilted purses, then moved up to smaller quilts -- Schnibbles and baby quilt sized.  I don't know that I'd do it for anything big.

My newest love is the fusible batting, however.  No more nasty spray fumes.  You do need to be very careful to make sure everything is as smooth as possible, but it really works.  So far, like before, I've just done Scnibbles and baby quilts (@ 45" x 54").  I even took the back off one of the Schnibbles when I didn't like how it looked & ironed on another -  the fusible stuff keeps working until it's washed.  The only downside is that I think it is slightly thinner than something like Warm and Natural. 

Has anyone tried the stuff that you can iron on your regular batting to piece it together instead of sewing it?  Looks like it would be quite handy for all of my leftovers. 

Pat

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gini replied on Tue, Sep 21 2010 1:31 PM

pat, if i haven't welcomed you, welcome.  love your avatar.  is he a good cook?    i just quickly hand baste or spray baste my batt scraps together   gini

gini in north idaho

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Pat replied on Tue, Sep 21 2010 1:55 PM

Thanks, Gini.  That dog looks just like our old Golden, Clancy, and the kitchen layout is remarably similar to mine.  It makes me smile every time I see it.  Clancy couyldn't cook worth a darn, but he looked quite handsome in an apron (grin). 

If I find any of this tape & try it, I'll report.  Anything to save time (and my fingers)!

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