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T-shirt Quilt

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Patty Schleicher posted on Tue, Apr 23 2013 9:55 PM

Does any one have tips for doing a t-shirt quilt? This is another quilt I will be doing in the future and not really sure how to do these.

Thanks

HD Lady/Patty

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I have not done one before but it is my understanding that you stabilize the t-shirt then fussy cut to the block size of choice. Once you stabilize and cut the blocks you can use them just like you would any other block.  

aka Grandma Sunshine

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Yes, I have done this. Cut the T-shirt up the side seams and across the top just below the collar (the front or the back, whichever you are using for the quilt).  Then use fusible interfacing to stabilize the T-shirt so it won't stretch - you can buy this by the yard at Joann's and it's very cheap.  After that you can cut the stabilized T-shirt to whatever size you want.  I even used a sleeve logo on the corners of the quilt I made - I just cut the sleeve up the seam, fused it, and cut the piece to size.

I used woven fusible interfacing so the shirts would not be too stiff.  Fusible interfacing is not the same thing as what you'd use for appliqueing your quilts.  It's used in garment sewing to reinforce different stress points or give lighter fabrics some body in the collar areas, etc.  They sell it off the bolt at Joann's.  There is nonwoven, tricot, or woven.  I don't think it matters which type you use. 

Also, make sure the shirts are clean and not wrinkly before you start.  If you are worried about the iron on the T-shirt, you could use an applique sheet (if you have one) or maybe a thin cloth over the T-shirt while you are putting the fusible interfacing on. 

I found the most difficult step was getting up the nerve to cut the T-shirts, actually.  It is time-consuming to do the fusing but really necessary.  The end result is pretty cool once you get it sewn together, and especially if it is a gift. 

Hope this info is helpful!

 

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Thanks so much for the info. It will be very helpful!

Patty

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Eileen replied on Thu, Apr 25 2013 6:03 PM

I'll add a tip to Greenmonstr's thorough post - measure the shirts, or compare their sizes, before you trim them all down. You may want to see what the smallest one is to decide on what size to trim them all to, or you can use sashing (quilting cotton or leftover t-shirt fabric with interfacing) to make a smaller one the same size as larger shirts. I'll be doing this on a t-shirt quilt for one of my nephews. He's been collecting shirts for a while & a couple are 3-4 inches smaller than the rest.

Have fun!

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Wow, I'm so glad Patty posted this conversation.  Such good information. Thank you!

aka Grandma Sunshine

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