Top 10 Posters

French hem

Page 1 of 2 (20 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS

rated by 0 users
This post has 19 Replies | 3 Followers

Not Ranked
Posts 7
Points 95
sandra.kramer@sbcglobal.net Posted: Fri, Jan 22 2010 7:26 PM

I joined a quilt guild and one of the projects they have is making pillow cases. The gal in charge, stated to put a french hem on the rim of the pillow case. What is a french hem and how do I do it.

  • | Post Points: 50
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 27,720
Points 436,870
Nana replied on Fri, Jan 22 2010 8:13 PM

Sandra

A French Hem is an enclosed seam.  Make a 1/4 inch seam where you join the side together on the right side.  Place fabric wrong sides together and make seam .... press and turn case right sides together and fold your seam and make a large 1/4 seam this will totally enclose your raw edges.  You can do the same thing if you put a band around the opening of the case.  Sew your band to the pillow case with your seam going toward the wrong side then press and make another larger seam towards the right side and then press flat.   It will give you the little decorative edge that you see on higher end pillow cases. I hope this made sense.  If not just ask questions and I will try to better explain.   Some one here may be able to give you a website that shows this technique.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 5,445
Points 94,185

Sandra, if you're like me and do better with pictures, go to this site

FrenchHem

 


Gillette, WY

 

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 27,720
Points 436,870
Nana replied on Fri, Jan 22 2010 10:10 PM

Judy

I knew that someone would be able to post a site for her.  I am just not good at that.  Thanks.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 100 Contributor
Female
Posts 823
Points 12,720

Judy this is a great site , where were you when I was taking a dressmaking course 2 years agoLOL?

Judy Iliff:

Hampshire, England

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 28,424
Points 415,964
gini replied on Sat, Jan 23 2010 6:53 PM

sandra, it is also called a flat felled seam and it is like the ones on the inside  of blue jean's legs.

gini in north idaho

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 5,445
Points 94,185
Judy Iliff replied on Sat, Jan 23 2010 11:27 PM

jay-marie:

Judy this is a great site , where were you when I was taking a dressmaking course 2 years agoLOL?

Judy Iliff:

Um, teaching English and teaching the kids how to do web searches?! :-)

 


Gillette, WY

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 5,445
Points 94,185
Judy Iliff replied on Sat, Jan 23 2010 11:28 PM

gini:

sandra, it is also called a flat felled seam and it is like the ones on the inside  of blue jean's legs.

You know, Gini, I thought the same thing until I did the search for picture tutorial. They are actually two difference methods of making and encased seam. There's not a lot of difference, but there is a difference.

 


Gillette, WY

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 13,459
Points 244,017
Thea replied on Sun, Jan 24 2010 12:08 AM

And seamstresses will take offense if you don't call them by the right name...I grew up with a seamstress and until my Mom went back to college and becames a teacher this is what she did... I learned very eary what the correct names were...lol

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 75 Contributor
Female
Posts 1,784
Points 30,506
Joni replied on Sun, Jan 24 2010 12:28 PM

I was taught that this is a flat felled seam.  Totally different than the French seam.

Flat Felled seam.

Sew regular seam 5/8" allowancewrong sides together. press to one side from front.  clip 1 side of seam allowance.  Fold uncut side 0ver  1/8" inch then fold again to cover cut side.  Press, sew 1/8" from fold, Viola! Beautiful flat felled seam.  Should look like ouside leg seam on Jeans.  I love this seam, it hold up thru lots of heavy use.

Go to same site as french seam, click on flat felled seam for pictorial.

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 27,720
Points 436,870
Nana replied on Sun, Jan 24 2010 12:33 PM

Joni

That is what I was taught as well.  The flat felled seam remains on the outside and is stitched down while the french seam is stitched toward the wrong side and isn't stitched flat.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 27,720
Points 436,870
Nana replied on Sun, Jan 24 2010 12:33 PM

Joni

That is what I was taught as well.  The flat felled seam remains on the outside and is stitched down while the french seam is stitched toward the wrong side and isn't stitched flat.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 28,424
Points 415,964
gini replied on Sun, Jan 24 2010 12:48 PM

oops, i guess i was wrong.  not the first time that's ever happened.   gramma taught me to sew and she used the two interchangeably.  i didn't realize there was a difference.    gini

gini in north idaho

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 500 Contributor
Female
Posts 202
Points 5,090
Angel replied on Mon, Jan 25 2010 12:23 AM

Gini,

my mother was a tailor, she never liked being called a seamstress. She says" it says tailor on my diploma."

She would have said unless its couture, call it whatever you want to as long as the seams look "finished"

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 5,445
Points 94,185
Judy Iliff replied on Mon, Jan 25 2010 12:40 AM

Playing devil's advocate:

My favorite line from The Last Emperor: "If you want people to understand exactly what you say, you must say exactly what you mean." :-)

 


Gillette, WY

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Page 1 of 2 (20 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS
Have a Question? | About Us | Privacy Policy | Join Today © 2014 F+W All rights reserved.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use