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Sergers

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SHERRYS-3 posted on Fri, Jun 29 2012 7:59 PM

Hello All!

I read the previous questions about sergers, and wonder if one would improve my quilting or if it is more for making clothing.  What does the serger do better than my Janome sewing machine?

Thanks again,

 

Sherry S

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Kelli replied on Fri, Jun 29 2012 8:26 PM

I mostly use my serger for making purses, but I have seen where they have been used to make quilts. I have never done it though. I also use it to finish edges on cloth napkins and tablecloths when I'm in a hurry and don't want to mess with hems. 

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I use  my serger for flannel baby blankets, tote bags, some quilts and little quick things that need to be neat. Like an eyeglass case. 

I would love to learn more uses for it.  I took a t-shirt class once and liked it. Should take some more classes.

Deb

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Mz M replied on Fri, Jun 29 2012 10:21 PM

About the only thing I haven't used my serger for is quilting. I have used it for about everything else including sock monkeys, totes, purses, clothing, linens, gathering fabric and everything between. I'd have to think about using it for quilting; it might make the seams too thick with all the added thread.

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Kelli replied on Sat, Jun 30 2012 8:17 AM

Here is a link to a cute serger quilt that I want to try .... someday ( I have way too many quilt ideas floating around in my head lol)

http://youtu.be/nAzqq98Q0KI

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To successfully join seams with a serger, you would need a 5-thread machine. Sergers move with great speed, may or may not trim the seam allowance as it goes (blades can usually be retracted), and use a great deal of thread. The speed would make joining small pieces more tedious, and the extra thread is unnecessary. Also, since it joins the two seam allowances, you couldn't press seams open if that was your preference. It can be unforgiving and a pain to correct mistakes. On the other hand, it could take some of the tedium out of piecing if you were comfortable with it. A 4-thread machine with differential feed wouldn't do the job but is great for finishing seams on clothing. A 5-thread machine with differential is heaven for fashion sewing (for working with knits, for seams and hemming). They do not sew buttonholes, sew on buttons, nor are they suitable for stitch-in-the-ditch or any of the more delicate sewing that is often done by hand that can sometimes be done on a regular machine  (applique). If you see one in action, you'll want one, but ease of threading is a priority.

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