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Rachel Young Posted: Sun, Nov 20 2011 7:55 PM

Hey y'all! I just purchased my very first sewing machine 2 weeks ago - a Brother HS-2000. I've since made 3 pillows and a purse...and am almost finished with my first mini-quilt.

I say 'almost'...because I'm stuck on the "quilting" part! I purchased a kit and sewed everything according to the recipe. I was fine until I got to the very last step when it said "Sandwich, quilt, and bind" - um, what?

I researched on the internet and found out how to sandwich...and remember getting instruction from the dealer where I got my machine on binding (she prefers the 'feather stitch')...but the quilting part has me stumped. Is that a setting on the machine? How do they make such intricate stitching? I've seen some quilting designs that look like flowers and leaves, and others that look like random swirlies.

At any rate, I wanted to introduce myself and say hi! Looking forward to 'meeting' y'all!

Rachel

Rachel in East Tennessee

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MNnancy replied on Sun, Nov 20 2011 8:04 PM

Nice to meet you, Rachel.  How exciting to get a new sewing machine, and I'm glad to hear you've already put it to good use.

Free motion quilting does not come easy (unless perhaps you have an unusual talent for picking things up quickly).  Many of us start by using our walking foot to stitch in the ditch or do crosshatching.  To do more artistic designs, you'll want to scope out some videos on the Internet and then assemble some practice "sandwiches" to play around with.

Good luck!


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Susan replied on Sun, Nov 20 2011 8:12 PM

Welcome, Rachel! You may want to take a class for the actual quilting as its more complicated then it seems. However, if you do it on your own, practice, practice, practice before you work on your quilt. If you use your own machine, drop your feeddogs first. A good book on Machine Quilting would be very helpful to you. Hope you enjoy your time here at QCA, they are a wonderful,knowledgeable, caring bunch of folks.   Susan 

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Rachel, welcome to QCA.  This is a great site to learn quilting as you go.  There is so much information here and there is always plenty of people to answer your questions.

When I first learned machine quilting I used a walkiing foot and did diagonal lines or stiched in the ditch.  I much prefer to hand quilt and am still in the learning process with machine quilting.

Margaret

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Hi Rachel!  Welcome!  I had to laugh at your post.  I remember those days.  I am using an old cast-off sewing machine, so I typically hand-quilt.  In order to do that, I mark my top with chalk or washable pen, then I sandwich (layer my backing, batting, and top), baste it together (either w/ a running stitch or w/ a basting gun), then use quilting thread and a running stitch to quilt.  You'll need a hoop to stretch your quilt on if you do it that way.

I haven't tried using my sewing maching to quilt, but if I were to try, I think I'd use a straight stitch in-the-ditch to begin with.  OR mark where you want to go so you have some guidelines. 

Good luck and post some pictures when you get done!

 

JennieLeigh

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gini replied on Sun, Nov 20 2011 8:24 PM

rachel, hello and welcome to the group.   you need to read you sewing machine manual and see how to set you machine on free motion.     then fix some of your scraps to make a sandwich like you did with your quilt.   then practice making a design like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle.   machine piecing a small quilt is pretty easy, but it does take a little practice so your stitches aren't hurky-jerky.  it's all in making your needle's speed and the speed of your quilt under the needle synchronize  perfectly.

gini in north idaho

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Barbara replied on Sun, Nov 20 2011 11:58 PM

Rachel welcome to the club,   all I can say is Ditto to what everyone else has said , practice ,practice ,practice . Use your walking foot and your darning/free motion foot as your manual suggest. Watch lots of videos they really do help .

Liberty,Missouri

EAT!! SLEEP !! QUILT!!

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Nana replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 12:18 AM

Rachel

We have a group dedicated to free motion quilting with lots of discussions about techniques and what works for each person.  You may find it helpful.   

Just click on the above link and it will take you to the group.  You will find a list on the right side of the screen that says discussions.   Click on discussions and it will give you a whole list of topics.   Good luck and have fun.

Vinton, Virginia

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Sukochi replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 3:45 AM

Hi Rachel, Welcome. I have a Brother CS6000i Computer.  I know nothing about machines.  Mine FMQ's but I have not one idea how to do that. I did manage to do some stippleing on the front of a crazy quilt block the other day. Have no clue about the feed dog business. I feed my dog in the kitchen. When my sister, who has recently learned to machine quilt on her Janome, said I could drop my feed dogs. I had no clue what she was talking about.  She said to get some fabric with an easy pattern on it to follow and just try everything to learn what it does. Maybe, one day I will. If not, I will die with stacks of quilt tops.  It is not cheap to have them done, especially if I could do it my self for free.

Sukochi

 

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Leslie replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 5:02 AM

Hi Rachel, welcome

[Ava, Missouri

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Diana replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 6:25 AM

Hi Rachel and wlecome from a fellow Tennessean.  I'm about an hour east of Knoxville.  I only do stitch in the ditch or cross-hatching myself when I do a bit of machine quilting.  I tie most of my quilts or send them to a Long-armer.  You'll get lots of info here and have fun.

Diana in East Tn.

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Karla replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 9:05 AM

Welcome Rachel from the great western state of Nevada.

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Welcome Rachel--

I see you've gotten quite a number of helpful hints already.  This group is so good about that.  Don't think there has ever been a question that didn't get tons of answers and always something that is the perfect fit.  Enjoy quilting and your time here.  We'd love to hear about and see your projects as you get going.

 

Kissimmee, FL

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Flojo replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 2:49 PM

Susan :
A good book on Machine Quilting would be very helpful to you. Hope you enjoy your time here at QCA, they are a wonderful,knowledgeable, caring bunch of folks.   Susan 

Welcome Rachel!  Glad to have you here.  As for a good book on machine quilting, be carefull!  Try to look at the book before you buy or have one recomended by someone who knows what is in it.  I bought a book called learn to machine quilt via a book club and would up with a book on how to piece the blocks.  As far as how to actually quilt the 3 layers it said "as prefered"!  Needless to say, I sent it right back! 

Anyway, the ladies here have several hundred years experience (combined) and will are willing answer any questions and give suggestions to help you.  I know!  They have helped me out with several projects ;-))

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Marie replied on Mon, Nov 21 2011 6:12 PM

Rachel wilcome.  I think "Craftsy" is the place for you as well as this site being an excellent source.  Craftsy has classes on just about anything and one of them is quilting on your sewing machine from beginning to more intricate designs and I highly recommend it.  Once you purchase the class it's yours forever so you could take it at your own pace.  It costs about $30 on sale so wait for that if it's more than that at this time.  The visuals are great and the teachers are very precise and teach in a language anyone could understand.  Hope you give it a try.  BTW I don't own stock in the company.  LOL   I just love the classes, I own 3, Quilty, Quilty ll, and Machine Quilting.

Millbury, MA

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