Top 10 Posters

Backstiching and seam allowance

rated by 0 users
Answered (Verified) This post has 4 verified answers | 15 Replies | 4 Followers

Not Ranked
5 Posts
Points 255
KaylaJo posted on Wed, Nov 9 2011 11:01 AM

These are probably very simple questions, but I am relatively new to quilting. I'm working on my 3rd now. I just saw a Fons and Porter video where they did chain sewing on their quilt blocks. She never back-stiched to lock the seams. I am assuming that they seams were locked when she pieced them with others. When, if ever, do you backstich when doing piecing?

Also, when you're doing a 1/4 in seam allowance how do you make sure that it's perfect and consistent without marking every piece? My stitch plate on my sewing maching does not have a 1/4 in marker.

Thanks so much!

  • | Post Points: 65

Answered (Verified) Verified Answer

Top 50 Contributor
Female
2,484 Posts
Points 43,625
Verified by KaylaJo

You can buy a 1/4 inch quilting foot for some machines, they have a little edge that you run the fabric along, some mark the machine with a strip of tape, may options.  You don't have to backstich because you will be sewing over every seam when you put the blocks togeather.  when you have the blocks assembled into a quilt top, some stich around the edge (or not)

  • | Post Points: 25
Top 150 Contributor
Female
461 Posts
Points 9,665
Answered (Verified) Flojo replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 11:09 AM
Verified by KaylaJo

Jo213,

The only time I back stitch is on the very outside seams after putting the quilt together where they will not be crossed by another seam.  If it has a border, I back stitch at the ends of the last two borders I put on.

As for the quarter inch marking, you can use a piece of tape on your machine, placed 1/4 inch away from the needle or purchase a 1/4 inch foot that will fit your machine.  I used tape for years befor buying my first 1/4 inch foot and the foot is much eaiser to use (for me) and worth the relative low cost.  Mine was less than $8.  Most new machines come with a 1/4 inch foot, but you can buy ones for the older machines.

  • | Post Points: 25
Top 10 Contributor
Female
27,741 Posts
Points 436,700
Answered (Verified) Nana replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 11:09 AM
Verified by KaylaJo

Jo

If you aren't able to get a 1/4 in quilting foot for your machine take a ruler with a quarter inch line that is easy to say.   Lay the ruler under your needle with the needle just a hair to the right of the quarter in mark and put tape on the machine plate at the edge of the ruler.   This gives you a sewing quideline when piecing.   I don't back stitch any of my seams during piecing.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 25
Not Ranked
5 Posts
Points 255
Verified by KaylaJo

Thank you all so much! You're answers were very helpful. I just contacted my local sewing repair shop and am going to pick up a 1/4 in presser foot tomorrow for only $6. That will make things much easier.

  • | Post Points: 25

All Replies

Top 50 Contributor
Female
2,484 Posts
Points 43,625
Verified by KaylaJo

You can buy a 1/4 inch quilting foot for some machines, they have a little edge that you run the fabric along, some mark the machine with a strip of tape, may options.  You don't have to backstich because you will be sewing over every seam when you put the blocks togeather.  when you have the blocks assembled into a quilt top, some stich around the edge (or not)

  • | Post Points: 25
Top 150 Contributor
Female
461 Posts
Points 9,665
Answered (Verified) Flojo replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 11:09 AM
Verified by KaylaJo

Jo213,

The only time I back stitch is on the very outside seams after putting the quilt together where they will not be crossed by another seam.  If it has a border, I back stitch at the ends of the last two borders I put on.

As for the quarter inch marking, you can use a piece of tape on your machine, placed 1/4 inch away from the needle or purchase a 1/4 inch foot that will fit your machine.  I used tape for years befor buying my first 1/4 inch foot and the foot is much eaiser to use (for me) and worth the relative low cost.  Mine was less than $8.  Most new machines come with a 1/4 inch foot, but you can buy ones for the older machines.

  • | Post Points: 25
Top 10 Contributor
Female
27,741 Posts
Points 436,700
Answered (Verified) Nana replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 11:09 AM
Verified by KaylaJo

Jo

If you aren't able to get a 1/4 in quilting foot for your machine take a ruler with a quarter inch line that is easy to say.   Lay the ruler under your needle with the needle just a hair to the right of the quarter in mark and put tape on the machine plate at the edge of the ruler.   This gives you a sewing quideline when piecing.   I don't back stitch any of my seams during piecing.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 25
Not Ranked
5 Posts
Points 255
Verified by KaylaJo

Thank you all so much! You're answers were very helpful. I just contacted my local sewing repair shop and am going to pick up a 1/4 in presser foot tomorrow for only $6. That will make things much easier.

  • | Post Points: 25
Top 10 Contributor
Female
28,610 Posts
Points 418,129
gini replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 12:55 PM

jo. the only time i back stitch is when i am hand piecing.    you know how hard they can be to get out, sew a stitch past the seam.    they aren't going anywhere.  

gini in north idaho

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
4,854 Posts
Points 85,760

Ok, Gini I have a question. If your bobbin runs out halfway from one end to the other, don't you have to backstitch where you start the seam again?

Sukochi

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
Female
2,484 Posts
Points 43,625

Usually I start the new stitching line back a few stitches which seems to secure both the first line and the second.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
27,741 Posts
Points 436,700
Nana replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 1:39 PM

Vivian

That is exactly what I do.  I just start sewing about 1/2 in back before I ran out of thread.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
28,610 Posts
Points 418,129
gini replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 1:57 PM

that's what i do, but i  start about a 1/4 inch back

gini in north idaho

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 25 Contributor
Female
4,854 Posts
Points 85,760

Thanks, ladies, I knew y'all would have the answer.

Sukochi

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Female
461 Posts
Points 9,665
Flojo replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 8:06 PM

Ditto to Nana, gini and Vivian.  I do not eve bother to cut my top thread, Just insert the bobbin, pull up the bottom thread back up and start sewing.  Of course this will not work on all machines, depends how you get to the bobbin! 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
28,610 Posts
Points 418,129
gini replied on Wed, Nov 9 2011 8:18 PM

Flojo:
depends how you get to the bobbin! 

 i don't know about you, but i get to the bobbin' via two glasses of wine.

gini in north idaho

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 25 Contributor
Female
9,059 Posts
Points 170,827

Two glasses of wine get me to the singin' and dancin.'  I'll leave the bobbin' to you.


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Female
13,768 Posts
Points 180,518
Marie replied on Thu, Nov 10 2011 10:10 AM

gini:
 i don't know about you, but i get to the bobbin' via two glasses of wine

Wait for me Gini, I'll bring the crackers and cheese.

Millbury, MA

  • | Post Points: 20
Page 1 of 2 (16 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS
Have a Question? | About Us | Privacy Policy | Join Today © 2015 F+W All rights reserved.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use