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Recreating an old quilt

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Lena48 posted on Fri, Nov 4 2011 3:48 PM

Just prior to WWI, a woman in Kansas City, MIssouri made a quilt for her hope chest. She married and her husband went off to war. He did not return. When I was born in KC, MO, Mrs. Woodbury gave the quilt to me. I used it too well and eventually it became too delicate to use any more.

I want to recreate this quilt for my daughter and for my daughter-in-law. How do I find out (1) what the design is and (2) where can I find fabric that would be fairly close in color/design to that era. See the photo below:

Thanks for any suggestions!

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Answered (Verified) Pamela replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 12:49 PM
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The history of quilts and quilt patterns is intriguing. All of the above answers provides a name for this quilt. Quilt patterns have various names based upon the regional influence and period of time that they were made.

Sunshine and Shadow uniquely refers to Amish made quilts, especially from Pennslyvania. The pattern is one of the three most common patterns among the Amish and would have been made from solid fabric scraps. The pattern was also completed as a center medallion with wide borders for the lavish feather quilting for which the Amish are well-known.

Trip Around the World quilts are most often the same quilt pattern interpretation, but done in patterned fabrics and without the wide borders. This distinguishes the makers from the Amish quilts. This pattern has also been around since Colonial times. It is a basic square patch and lent itself to scrap quilts.

The Boston Commons is a lesser know pattern that is generally rectangular in shape with less variation in the color pattern. It's name suggests a regional interpretation.

The Quilt Index has documented examples of quilts from the New England regions that refer to quilts with this type of pattern as Philadelphia Pavement. Our local historical museum has an example that was donated and referred to by this name. Interestingly, Ruth Finley and Carrie Hall both describe this pattern as a variation on a Shoofly in their respective books written in the early 1900's.

They also have a Trip Around the World.

Both of these quilts are made in a similar fashion, yet the each maker called it a different pattern.

So, as you can see, many names can refer to the same or similar patterns. Everyone has a response to the name of a quilt, but the quilt and maker can provide more about the history of your specific quilt. I would suggest that your friend would have likely called her pattern the Trip Around the World, considering the maker's Midwest regional location. A suggestion would be to have the old quilt appraised. Although is would not be worth much value in it's present condition, the appraiser could provide history of the quilt pattern and fabrics specific to your Kansas region.

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Answered (Not Verified) Diana replied on Fri, Nov 4 2011 3:54 PM
Suggested by Carey

The pattern name is 'Trip around the World'.  To find fabrics take a photo of your quilt or actually take the quilt and try to find fabrics that are similar to the fabrics in the quilt.  I hope you find some that you'll like.  It may not be exact, but just the fact you are honoring the person who originally gave you that quilt is beautiful.  Good Luck.

Diana in East Tn. 

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gini replied on Fri, Nov 4 2011 4:22 PM

your setting might be boston commons.  it depends on whether the colors form a diamond or a  square/rectangle

http://rlbates.wordpress.com/2010/10/06/boston-commons-miniature-quilt/

this can be made by strip piecing and is quite easy to make.

gini in north idaho

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gini replied on Fri, Nov 4 2011 4:24 PM

sunshine and shadow is another name for this type of quilt

gini in north idaho

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Joy replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 8:50 AM

I know this quilt as "trip around the world." Eleanor Burns has a great book/pattern for this quilt. I have made many quilts using her books/patterns and they always turn out fantastic. (And much easier to do than I originally thought!)

http://www.eleanorburns.com/default.asp?

Joy

Mooresville, NC

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Answered (Verified) Pamela replied on Sun, Nov 6 2011 12:49 PM
Verified by Lena48

The history of quilts and quilt patterns is intriguing. All of the above answers provides a name for this quilt. Quilt patterns have various names based upon the regional influence and period of time that they were made.

Sunshine and Shadow uniquely refers to Amish made quilts, especially from Pennslyvania. The pattern is one of the three most common patterns among the Amish and would have been made from solid fabric scraps. The pattern was also completed as a center medallion with wide borders for the lavish feather quilting for which the Amish are well-known.

Trip Around the World quilts are most often the same quilt pattern interpretation, but done in patterned fabrics and without the wide borders. This distinguishes the makers from the Amish quilts. This pattern has also been around since Colonial times. It is a basic square patch and lent itself to scrap quilts.

The Boston Commons is a lesser know pattern that is generally rectangular in shape with less variation in the color pattern. It's name suggests a regional interpretation.

The Quilt Index has documented examples of quilts from the New England regions that refer to quilts with this type of pattern as Philadelphia Pavement. Our local historical museum has an example that was donated and referred to by this name. Interestingly, Ruth Finley and Carrie Hall both describe this pattern as a variation on a Shoofly in their respective books written in the early 1900's.

They also have a Trip Around the World.

Both of these quilts are made in a similar fashion, yet the each maker called it a different pattern.

So, as you can see, many names can refer to the same or similar patterns. Everyone has a response to the name of a quilt, but the quilt and maker can provide more about the history of your specific quilt. I would suggest that your friend would have likely called her pattern the Trip Around the World, considering the maker's Midwest regional location. A suggestion would be to have the old quilt appraised. Although is would not be worth much value in it's present condition, the appraiser could provide history of the quilt pattern and fabrics specific to your Kansas region.

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Many thanks to all of you who responded to my inquiry. I am happy to know a bit of history of this pattern as I move forward with my project. I will put my finished Trip Around the World up when it is done.

M

 

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Thanks! I'll check out her book.

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Thanks!

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