Top 10 Posters

which Brand of thread is the best?

rated by 0 users
Answered (Not Verified) This post has 0 verified answers | 50 Replies | 13 Followers

Not Ranked
Female
43 Posts
Points 1,265
Kathy posted on Sat, Oct 29 2011 10:59 PM

Hi Everyone,

I have a question for anyone with an opinion. Should cover everybody. I have been reading about buying the best that you can afford in fabric, machines, and...........thread. So...which brand of thread is the best. From what I understand, egyptian cotton thread is the best kind of thread due to the long staples and that it will hold up better. But I am scratching my head when I go to the different stores and look at all the quilting sites and try to figure out which brand to buy. Any thought on this folks?

 

Thanks,

Kathy


  • Filed under:
  • | Post Points: 185

All Replies

Top 10 Contributor
Female
27,717 Posts
Points 436,765
Nana replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 12:08 AM

Kathy

I don't know what is considered the "best" brand of thread.  I think everyone has their own favorites.  I have found that some machines don't do well with some brands of threads.  I use the Essentials brand from Connecting Threads alot just because it is fairly cheap and still a good quality.  Although some of it is a little linty.  I really like Aurifil but it is pricey in my opinion.  I also like using King Tut for the actual quilting.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Female
4,847 Posts
Points 85,755

I am really confused about this, as well. I ask the owner of my LQS when I need thread.  Last time, she told me it is much cheaper to buy the basic colors for machine piecing in those big spools. I had bought the smaller one and was always running out of thread.  I think ,last time, I pikced up the wrong thread for machine piecing. I didn't notice it but later I realized that I had gotten machine quilting thread. Is there a difference in thread for piecing and quilting?  For what I am doing now, I just grabbed a spool of coats and clark all purpose and I don't like it on my machine.  Help.

Good Sunday a.m. to you.

Sukochi

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Female
425 Posts
Points 9,195
Pamela replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 7:44 AM

You're right, everyone has an opinion on thread. Instead of listen to everyone else, I decided to just try different threads. In the past, I used a lot of Coats & Clark. When I bought my Bernina, I changed to using the better quality threads. I started with Gutterman and Mettler threads. I found that the polyester threads are great for piecing, but, I learned to prefer cotton thread. Both of these brands tended to lint more than I liked. I started checking around and tried  YLI, Star (a supposed higher end by Coats & Clark), and Signature. I had difficulty with all of them. The YLI is always breaking; the Star still lints ways too much, and the Signature was no better than the Gutterman or Mettler. I decided to try Aurifil. I find that I really like it. Although it is more expensive, I find that their weight of thread, although the same as Gutterman & Mettler, is thinner, still strong and goes farther. My bobbins last longer and the thread  spool has so much more on it. I have yet to try silk thread. Rayons are more for decorative stitching and I haven't mastered how to use them without breakage. I know quilters that swear by Superior Threads. I haven't tried them. They are the high end in price, and since I am satisfied with my current choices in thread, I don't feel that I need to purchase the higher priced Superior brand. I haven't tried the thread from Connecting Threads and am glad to here that it works well. Maybe, someday, I'll purchase some.

Piecing and quilting thread are definitely different. Quilting thread is heavier. Thread for piecing is generally 50 wt. or higher. The higher the number the thinner the thread. The lower the number, the thicker the thread. Think of perle cotton - it comes in #8 & #12 wt. and is very thick compared to 50 wt. thread. Perle cotton is not for use in a sewing machine, but used for hand stitching. A 40 wt. thread is generally considered a hand quilting or hand appliqueing weight thread. Machine quilting thread may be a higher number. Superior thread has a "bottom line" thread they promote for use in the bobbin for machine quilting. I believe it is a 100 wt. thread. Used with their "top line" thread, it is supposed to work well for long-arm quilting.

Choice of thread may also depend on what you plan to do with the finished quilt. Many of my quilts are given away, so I'm not worried about placing them into a juried and judged show. In the long run, the choice of thread is up to you. Don't let anyone tell you that you have to use something different.

  • Filed under:
  • | Post Points: 50
Top 150 Contributor
Female
546 Posts
Points 11,066
Happy replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 8:14 AM

I like auriful the best

Happy

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Female
43 Posts
Points 1,265
Kathy replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 9:01 AM

I started out buying Gutterman since that seemed to be the favorite at Joanne fabrics for sewing in general. I am seeing different brands at the LQS and would like to try some of the colors. I haven't seen Aurifil anywhere except online, so I haven't tried that. I guess I will try a couple of different kinds from and see what I like. I don't have enough experience in quilting to have a preference yet. I prefer to buy locally whenever possible as opposed to online, only because then I can actually touch and see what I'm getting,but I think I will try online for some threads. 5 dollar shipping is singing my song, so I guess I will buy from Red Rock unless someone knows somewhere else that can beat that price with shipping. Thanks for the input everybody. I did see the posts about threads after I posted. I have been reading those as well.

 

Kathy


  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Female
641 Posts
Points 16,270
Answered (Not Verified) Zsofia replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 9:11 AM
Suggested by Zsofia

Kathy,

I like Gutermann sew-all thread and Coats & Clark Dual Duty  these are polyester threads , I tried cotton ones too Connecting threads cotton thread and Coats & Clark worked fine (I prefer polyester over cotton for piecing ). For quilting (so far I mastered the quilt in the ditch and echo quilting) I use invisible nylon thread or Coats & Clark Machine Quilting cotton thread.  But I think you should buy a few different spools and try them!

Zsofia

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Female
843 Posts
Points 18,935
Cindy replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 9:25 AM

Kathy,

Of course  this is my personal opinion, I use Mettler thread.  I find it has worked the best for me.  I purchase mine on line in 5 spool lots.  I use mostly gray or beige for piecing so I purchase 10 spools at a time, get a pretty good price and keeps me from running into town as much.  Like everyone has said, it all boils down to what works best for you.

Cindy

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 50 Contributor
Female
2,809 Posts
Points 43,669
Eileen replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 9:44 AM

Kathy,

Yep, everyone has their own personal preferences! :-)  It can be fun to play with different threads & see what you - and your machine - like best.  For some info on the different types, you could always search on Google.  I tried "thread guide for quilters" and this is just one site with info on thread types: http://quilting.about.com/od/stepbystepquilting/tp/thread-tips-quilting.htm

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
4,583 Posts
Points 75,695
Karla replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 6:37 PM

I've used a lot of Connecting Threads Essentials thread for both piecing and quilting and it has worked fine for me.  I have some Signature variegated thread that I just bought at Joann's when it was on sale last week, but I haven't tried it yet so I can't give you my opinion on it yet.

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 75 Contributor
Female
1,057 Posts
Points 13,695
Carey replied on Sun, Oct 30 2011 7:29 PM

I also like aurifil best I have tried coat and clark and other brands a few of them. The other brands are gone to quickly, tend to break or get stuck when threading or sewing. Aurifil according to the lqs staff here is best for the money you get more thread on the spool than other brands due to its fineness yet it doesn't break hardly.

Your other question answer is yes there is a difference between quilting quilting thread and machine piecing thread. Quilting thread tends to come in many different forms and brands. There is even more widespread opinions on which is the best for that as well. I don't have a particular one but sulky is good :)

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
7 Posts
Points 80

Naturally, I'm a little biased to this post, but would like to share some information if I may.  Here is a link to our thread selection chart, which will help you choose which thread to use dependent upon the application - http://www.superiorthreads.com/media/docs/Thread_Selection_Guide.pdf

We also have new videos posted which discusses many topics such as Egyptian Cotton, Polyester, Thread Quality, and other important subjects which all relate to threads.  http://www.superiorthreads.com/videos/thread-therapy-with-dr-bob-educational-videos/

We've found that the best thread to use is whatever works for you and your project.

Thanks,

Todd

 

We provide happiness in the form of Cotton, Polyester, & Silk Threads.  Sew Superior...... It's Guaranteed!
http://www.superiorthreads.com

  • | Post Points: 5
Not Ranked
Female
4 Posts
Points 100

My nickname is The Thread Lady and I have done lots of classes and lots of talks to quilt clubs about this. One of the main things I want to stress is that always use name brand threads is a great answer! Why take all the time to make quilt and use cheap thread so that it falls apart? However, as to what is the best thread---there is no answer. It all depends on what your sewing machine likes! I know this sounds silly, but I have taught classes with 8 people in the class and almost everyone has a different brand of machine. I bring lots of thread for students to try and it is always name brand thead, but some machines just won't do well with certain brands or certain  types of thread, My best advice is to make sure you are using the right needle for the thread! You can't use an 80/12 needle and sew with a trilobal polyester thread that is a 30 weight. It just doesn't work. Look on the thread (most of them say on the label what size needle to use). If no size is listed go to the manufacturer's website and it will be on there. I prefer Superior Threads, but I use lots of other brands also. If you want information about thread go to the Superior website (Superior Threads,com). Look under Education and there are about 90 pages of info. The info there applies not just to Superior Threads, but to threads in general. Check out the video where the owner of Superior Threads passes out thread to all the people in the room. It is an eye-opening experience! One of the things I used to stress to my students (I have retired from teaching to concentrate on doing my own quilts) is that if you are using a small spool of thread you MUST use a thread cap!  When I used to say this people would say "What is a thread cap?" You all got them with your machines! They go on top of the spool of thread to make sure the thread doesn't spin as it comes off the spool. Just think about it. If the spool is spinning, then the thread is spinning as it goes through the machine. This will always lead to thread breakage and horrible thread appearance! Thread should come off the top of the spool as if you were holding the spool in your hand and pulling the thread off. If you do that, the spool doesn't spin and the thread comes off in the right way. That's why you need a spool cap. Unfortunately, the newer machines have short spool holders that don't account for the kind of thread we now buy. They are too short so most people can't put a spool cap on. My advice is to get a heavy metal spool stand that sits at the back of your machine. These have longer spools and can be capped! You will be amazed at how much better your stitches look when the thread is coming off a spool that is not spinning. I could go on and on, but it would take me a book to write all I know about thread. One of the things I have learned is that the newer machines that are set in the factory seem to have technicians who set the top tension too high. I don't know why this is, but when I had students turn the tension from the factory setting to a lower setting they had much less trouble with their threads. Hope this helps a little and doesn't add to the confusion! I am open to e-mails about any thread questions. Jo Goranson (The Thread Lady).

  • | Post Points: 80
Top 25 Contributor
Female
4,847 Posts
Points 85,755

Jo, thank yo so very much. This is wonderful advice. I sure appreaciate it. I have no idea about this thread cap. Probably didn't know what it was so just set it aside.

Sukochi

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Female
641 Posts
Points 16,270
Zsofia replied on Mon, Oct 31 2011 7:23 PM

Jo, Thanks so much for the information on thread and needle size and the "thread cap" (which I never heard of). I checked my threads and some of them don't match the needle which I used with.... I'm not surprised I got frustrated when I tried different ones out. 

Zsofia

  • | Post Points: 50
Page 1 of 4 (51 items) 1 2 3 4 Next > | RSS
Have a Question? | About Us | Privacy Policy | Join Today © 2014 F+W All rights reserved.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use