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Quilting a Jelly Roll Quilt

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Renee posted on Tue, Aug 16 2011 6:41 PM

Hello,

I am in the planning stages for making a 1600 Jelly Roll quilt.

 Does anyone have any suggestions/idea of how to quilt this besides stitch in the ditch and free motion.

 

Thanks

 

Renee

 

 

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I've been trying to decide the exact same thing. Two of my Jelly Roll 1600 quilts will be stitch in the ditch because they are batik front and backs and don't really have a pattern. On another I'm using an oriental swam material for the back (batik for the front) so I'm thinking of outlining the swans so the design will come through the front. I'd welcome any other ideas.

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Nana replied on Tue, Aug 16 2011 9:33 PM

Renee

I would really need to see the quilt before I could begin to have quilting ideas.  Sorry.

Vinton, Virginia

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Answered (Not Verified) Nana replied on Tue, Aug 16 2011 9:34 PM
Suggested by Carey

Lauralyn

I think outlining the back design sounds awesome.  I am sure that the quilt will be gorgeous.

Vinton, Virginia

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Carey replied on Fri, Aug 19 2011 9:49 AM

You could stipple but I'm not sure that falls under free motion or if its different.  I have never done stippling it looks to hard for my talent level. I usually free motion or in the ditch. I sometimes echo the free motion to make it easier.  If you have money and don't want to fmq it yourself you could bring it to a longarmer and have them do the work. Just be ready to put aside a good chunk of money depending on the design you choose if you go that way.

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Answered (Not Verified) Nana replied on Fri, Aug 19 2011 9:55 AM
Suggested by Carey

Carey

Stippling really isn't difficult.  You just start doodling with the machine.  And it is considered FMQ.

Vinton, Virginia

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Carey replied on Fri, Aug 19 2011 10:14 AM

Oh cool well I guess you make squiggly lines lol. I suck at actual drawing.

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Instead of stitch in the ditch, you could do a decorate stitch down the length of the seam.

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Nana replied on Fri, Aug 19 2011 10:20 AM

Carey:

Oh cool well I guess you make squiggly lines lol. I suck at actual drawing.

 

Yep.....it is pretty much making squiggly lines.   You sort of imagine outlining puzzle pieces.

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gini replied on Fri, Aug 19 2011 10:35 AM

renee, stippling was the easiest  for me to learn

gini in north idaho

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