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Jeanine replied on Fri, Aug 12 2011 8:12 PM | Locked

Beth Weigt:
I've only been quilting for a couple of years and a year ago was able to purchase a used Janome 1600P and Gracie frame

I started with a Janome 1600P with a New Joy frame.  I am now using the 1600P as my piecing machine.  I used that set up for about 4 years with no stitch regulator so I can relate to those in that situation.  I actually felt like I could do just fine without the regulator after I got used to it. 

 

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MNnancy replied on Fri, Aug 12 2011 8:37 PM | Locked

Judy Lee:
I turned my machine to manual stitching and found out that if I set the stitch speed to 30 and started to quilt that I did fine on the straightaways but  I could not help but the speed up on curves just like driving a car.

Isn't that the truth!!!  I also find that it's difficult to go from free-wheeling doodling action to echo stitching around shapes.  I start going really slow when I'm tracing a shape, and my stitches get teeny-tiny.  Need lots of practice!

I was at a yard sale this afternoon, and I bought 2 old cotton bed sheets and a thin cotton blanket all for $3.00.  I'll use those for a nice size practice canvas.


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Jeanine replied on Fri, Aug 12 2011 9:00 PM | Locked

One thing I had to learn is to not push the machine but just guide it.  It is so easy to go too fast on the curves.  And also to aniticipate the curves just like you drive...look ahead a bit.  It is definitely a skill.

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Jeanine replied on Sat, Aug 13 2011 6:15 PM | Locked

I need to find a variagated thread for a quilt I just got today to quilt.  I am looking for a greens/purples varigated to use on the longarm.  Does anyone have suggestions of their favorite places to buy thread?

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MNnancy replied on Sat, Aug 13 2011 7:46 PM | Locked

Jeanine,

For general purpose solid colors, I like Essential Thread from the Connecting Threads catalog/web site.  For variegated, I like King Tut, and I really prefer to buy it at my LQS because I need to see the colors in person.


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Granny M replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 8:19 AM | Locked

I have done two practice pcs now.   One is a lap quilt, and I should have done an all over design.  But I wanted to know how the Jewel responded to small moifs.  Had lots of starts and stops.   I also ended up with not enough batting, although I had measured the batting and I had laided the top over it before I put on the frame.  Had no Idea how that happened.  I put another pc in and finshed.  I am also having a problem knowing how high or low to put my rollers.  Any words of wisdom. 

I got a couple of "nests" and broke the thread.  Don't know how I managed that either.   When I get the lap quilt binding on I will post a picture.  I need to try a pentagraph.  Haven't done that yet. 

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Jeanine replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 8:34 AM | Locked

Granny M:
I also ended up with not enough batting, although I had measured the batting and I had laided the top over it before I put on the frame.  Had no Idea how that happened. 

I can address the batting.  The longarm does pull the batting in some so you want to be sure you have 4-8 inches extra on all sides to be safe.  It also may have something to do with how it lines up at the start of the quilt.  You will probably have a minimum overhang of batting at the top since you have control there.  The other thing is every time you advance the quilt, make sure you smooth out your batting sothe batting is distributed evenly throughout the quilt.

I remember getting "nests" on my short arm.  Sometimes, I would just forget to put the foot down!  Sometimes the thread gets out of the normal thread path and causes issues.  I always rethreaded  when I had issues.  I'm not familiar with your model so I don't have specific suggestions here.

 

 

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Granny M replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 9:03 AM | Locked

Jeanine:
The longarm does pull the batting in some so you want to be sure you have 4-8 inches extra
  Thanks Jeanine, The sides were just fine, it was the end of the quilt, that there was not enough batting.   If you have 4-8 inches of batting and backing on the sides, how do you get the bungee cords on without that folding under the quilt and being caught in the stitching?

Granny M

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Nana replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 9:06 AM | Locked

Granny M

I always attached my bungees to the backing and batting and not the top.  The top I just smoothed over the rest with my hand and the rollers held it securely.

Vinton, Virginia

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Jeanine replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 9:50 AM | Locked

Granny M:
If you have 4-8 inches of batting and backing on the sides, how do you get the bungee cords on without that folding under the quilt and being caught in the stitching?

The sides are not as important to have that much extra because you can see that.  You need to have the extra for the length because you don't know how much it will pull up until you get to the end.  You should have about the same extra on your backing and batting and attach the bungees to only the back and batting. If you do have a little extra batting, I just fold it over making sure it does not fold over onto the top. Then I pin or baste the edges as you go.  And then as you advance, be sure to gently pull the batting out to be sure there isn't extra gathering under your top. 

 

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Granny M replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 6:46 PM | Locked

Thanks Nana & Jeanine.  I read an article today that said the same thing.  Lord I have a lot to learn.  I was attaching the bungees to all three pieces as that was what they did at the store when I demoed the machine.  Thank goodness for all of you keeping me straight.  that will make it a lot easier to make sure the top is straight and to check the batting. 

Here is another question.  On the borders, do you do the top and bottom border then turn the quilt and repin to do the sides?  If you turn do you just pin on the top roller?  I know that would not be needed on a alover design, but would be on say a feather design in the border.

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Jeanine replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 6:53 PM | Locked

Granny M:
On the borders, do you do the top and bottom border then turn the quilt and repin to do the sides? 

This is something I can't give any advise on.  I usually do all over designs and when I have attempted to do custom work I don't turn the borders but try to find a place to stop and then start again to not look like it is done in pieces.  I think my goal is to figure out how to never turn a quilt but that's just me.  Someone else who actually has experience here will have to answer you a little better.

 

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Granny M replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 7:02 PM | Locked

Jeanine:

You will need to use an industrial needle for your machine which is the 134R. 

  I looked at the two sites and allbrands.  the sewtrue site listed various sizes under the 134R the other two sites did not, So I am confused again.  Is there a 1 size fits all needle, or do you still use like a 14 or 16. 

Granny M

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Jeanine replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 7:28 PM | Locked

The 134R tells you the type of needle your machine uses.  The 14 or 16 (or 18, 12, etc.) tells you how big the eye of the needle is.  This is something you will just have to learn with your machine.  I would not ever use one smaller than a 14.  I personally use 16 for the APQS.  If the eye of the needle is too small, the thread can't pass through smoothly and it will result in threads breaking.  The bigger the needle, the bigger the whole it will leave in the fabric.  However, once the quilt is washed (or you can even spray water on the stitching and rub a little if it bothers you) the whole will close up.  The thread just seems to flow better for me through a 16.  If you are having a lot of issues with thread breaking, you might want to get a bigger needle. Of course, if you use different types of thread, you will have to decide the best needle.  If you use some of the heavier threads, you will need a larger needle.  Make sense? 

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Nana replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 8:20 PM | Locked

Granny M

To do a different pattern in the borders you do the top and bottom border as you are quilting the top.  Then you take it off the leaders and turn the quilt so the sides are on the top and bottom.  I found that I had to pin to both leaders but then I could do both borders before I took it off.

As for needles I found that the 18 was a good size for everything I quilted.  It didn't fray the thread and would go thru even the heaviest quilts without breakage.

Good luck and have fun.

Vinton, Virginia

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