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Paper Piecing? English piecing?

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Valerie replied on Mon, Jun 29 2009 11:05 AM

Good Luck Gini and Sandy on your piecing. I just started to do some English piecing for practice, I won't make anything for awhile. It seems to be going good so far, I have mylar templates that I am using, this way I can reuse them since they are plastic.

Valerie

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Tawnya replied on Mon, Jun 29 2009 3:25 PM

I am not an expert at all, a barely novice would be more accurate(three blcoks).  I belong to another quilt forum and they swap blocks there.  The paper piecing blocks are supposed to be sent with the paper on.  The hostess of the swap wrote that she keeps the paper on until the top is constructed.  This tip is not from  my experience since I have practically none,,,,,,,,,but I've written to the hostess and she's great with tips.She does beautiful work, so I feel confident her tip is a good one to share.

Tawnya in Canton, Ohio

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Sandy H. replied on Mon, Jun 29 2009 3:55 PM

Thanks Tawnya.  I remember from the class I took that she said to leave the paper on until the blocks were sewn together.  I thought since I had put them in rows that it would be ok to remove the paper.  Maybe I should have taken Paper Piecing Part 2!  Thanks for checking this out.  I'm going to put the rows together and see how that works.

  

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Tawnya replied on Mon, Jun 29 2009 5:51 PM

Let me know how that works.  If it's not too hard,,,,,,,,,,,,I might try more than 3 blocks LOL.  I thought it was fun, I just got interested in making a quilt for someone and so I didn't finish the paper-piecing. 

 

Tawnya in Canton, Ohio

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Kris replied on Mon, Jun 29 2009 8:31 PM

I love paper piecing. I like that it is so accurate and it makes it easy to get really small pieces into a quilt. I have several books from Carol Doak.

I've tried english paper piecing but I'm not too thrilled by the process. I thought it would be perfect for me since I enjoy handwork and could bring the pieces to work with me. I watched Brandy Stell's videos (she's fun to watch) and bought her mylar pieces. Still don't like the process.

I am using Inklingo to do my own GFG quilt, I like this much better.

Kris

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Hi Valerie,

Sorry for the late reply.  I'm working on a quilt back now which is paper pieced.  I don't use spray adhesive, but I do use a glue stick.  Just a small amount to tack the fabric to the paper.  When I do piecing I don't care about where the bias is, the paper works like a stabilizer.  I also pin when I'm adding a new fabric.  Usually just one in the center of the piece so I can keep the new piece of fabric from moving.

I personally remove the paper next to the completed seams as I go along.  If I'm making a star or a block which has lots of seams, once the block is done I remove the paper next to the most internal seams, once I have it in a row then I remove the paper between the blocks just as long as that piece is not acting as a stabalizer for the next row, if it is I leave it in.  That is just personal preference.

For everyone who hasn't tried paper piecing I have a few suggestions:

Shorten up your stitch length.  Before I start a new project I always do a test on a piece of paper to make sure my stitch length is correct, generally about 20/in.  If your paper falls apart after you have stitched you need to length it.  If it doesn't tear off easily you need to shorten it. 

I suggest cutting the outside of your paper to NOT include your seam allowance.  This allows you to go off the edge of the paper a bit to anchor your stitching, it lets you visually see your seam allowance when you are putting your pieces together and it makes it easier when removing the paper because you've stitched off the end thereby perforating the paper fully.

On seams that run up perpendicular to another seam go over the edge a bit, that way you have nice crisp lines

If you are going to use a glue stick, put it on the paper not on the fabric.  That way you don't risk stretching your fabric and you have more control over where the glue is going.

Good Luck!  Once you have it, it is a great way to quilt. 

Robin

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Rhonnie replied on Wed, Jul 8 2009 7:16 PM

Thanks Robin...

I have never done paper piecing or english piecing. I am far from experienced in most things atleast that is my opinion...I am self taught most of what I do and so therefore haven't taken on that learning experience yet but I do have a kit here that has the paper piecing on my list of to dos one day...lol.

I'm a material girl....Want to see my fabric collection?

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Darlene Cooper:

I'm not a fan of spray at all.  I lhave ruined several pieces of fabric  in the dust and reminents on my cutting board after a co-worker used the spray and didn't clean up good.  But anyway what about using wash-out or water soluable backing like you use for machine embroadery to make the paper pieces.  Then the first time the quilt is washed the filler is gone. Also, this type of stabilizer doesn't clog up the sewing needles.

Excuse my spelling the spell check isn't working! lol

Darlene Cooper

www.2sistersquiltshop.com

 

Darlene, you suggested using water soluable stabilizer like you would use for embroidery.  Well, guess what I found at JoAnn's today?  Water soluable paper piecing paper!!!  I will definitely try it on my next project.  Removing the paper was a huge pain

 

 

  

Southwest Florida

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Rhonnie replied on Wed, Jul 8 2009 8:22 PM

I know I had heard the paper removing was a pain is one reason that kit is in pile of things to do one day. But I might have to try the water soluable stuff....I do like easy.

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Hi Rhonnie,

I too am self taught.  :)

I have also used freezer paper for paper piecing, which of course means you don't need any adhesive.  It also means you have to draw or copy your patterns out by hand.  

Robin

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Kris replied on Thu, Jul 9 2009 12:20 AM

Sandy,

Fons & Porter did an episode of their show where the demonstrated the water soluble paper for foundation paper. I was intrigued but never did try it. Now that you've reminded me of it I think I'll give it shot. These days I've been using "Fun-dation" instead of paper. 

I do use Wonder Tape (wash away tape) a lot and I really like that.

Kris

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Michelle replied on Thu, Jul 9 2009 12:39 AM

I have dabbled in both English piecing and paper piecing.  The finished product and the time it took to get to an end point suggest I could use a lot more practice, but the ability to get really sharp points is worth trying to master the paper piecing  technique.

I may change my mind as I try new ideas, but so far I favor freezer paper for paper piecing.  You do have to trace your design, but if you stack several sheets (5-6 max) together with the drawn sheet on top you can sticth through the stack without thread in the sewing machine.  A good way to anchor the stack of paper sheet together is to tap a couple of corners with the tip of your hot iron.  It will hold the sheets together long enough for you to stitch the design.

My favorite way to do English paper piecing is to use mylar templates and spray starch applied with a brush.  If you spray some of the starch into the lid it will puddle and you can then use a brush to apply where you want without worrying about overspray and a mess on your ironing board.  The starch stiffens up the fabric making it easier to mold around the template.

Sorry, I see I was a little wordy.  Hopefully, I was able to describe my ideas clearly enough to help.

Michelle

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gini replied on Thu, Jul 9 2009 12:42 AM

 rhonnie,  i have a machine appliqued quilt mostly done.   getting the papers out of the tiny leaves is a nightmare.  gini

gini in north idaho

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Kris, I wish I had seen that F&P show before I started this project.  Did you see it on QNN-TV?

  

Southwest Florida

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Kris replied on Thu, Jul 9 2009 4:22 PM

Sandy,

It's on Fons and Porter's site. Episode 111 of the Love of Quilting series.

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