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I want to show of my Singer 201-2

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Marianne Nowicki posted on Thu, Jul 10 2014 5:10 AM

My Singer was "born" in 1948, she's 5 years younger than I am and she sews like a sewing machine should.  she has been cleaned and oiled and she looks good to me.  I finished a pillow case on her and she didn't balk at the several layers of material when I made the French seam over the piping and the sleeve.  I had looked at a Featherweight, but the bobbin placement is a bit to difficult for me to manage exchanging bobbins etc with my left hand. 

My singer 201 has the bobbin case on top and that's easier for me.   The singer 201 came with an instruction booklet and when I opened it, I saw the name Rose Loveless written inside on the first page.  I'm guessing that she was owned by a Rose, before she came to Marianne?  Look at her pretty face :-)

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Ginny, I got so ticked  wit pressing that button, that I quit the triple A auto club.  It really bothers me.  But one gal at my dentist is from Mexico and she speaks English  and she is very good at what she's doing.  I have nothing against the people from Mexico.  Only the button pressing irks me.

It's very good to learn other languages, because it keeps the mind fresh and clear.

Marianne

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Marie replied on Tue, Jul 15 2014 10:27 PM

Marianne, thanks for the hugs back.  So glad you fealt you were home when you arrived in Florida, must've been so nice.

Millbury, MA

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Marie,

The people in Florida are mostly very nice.  In the early 70th, they played the song " be a friendly Floridian" often on the radio.  It was  very different from Berlin, where shopping wasn't a pleasure due to the early closing of all stores.  Coming from work one had to rush to buy groceries.  The folks in Berlin are usually helpful and friendly too, but not while shopping.  I had really great neighbors, I'm still friends with my closest neighbor.  We emigrated because of the housing shortage.  When Berlin was rebuilt, the first apartments went for the Americans and the French soldiers.  Next came apartments for all the folks crossing over from the Russian controlled section.  Our apartment had a lot of mold and  our kids got sick.  Son Chris was more in the hospital than at home and the department that controlled the apartments told me that  we could only get into a new apartment if our son would get TBC.  We had hopes to get into a better apartment after the wall was build, but nothing changed.  The new apartments were build for the West German guest worker.  We had already all papers ready to move to Australia.  My DH had a job in Melbourne, when my sister suggested for us to emigrate to the USA, were our mom would babysit our kids.  My sister got us green cards to bring family together, but it  took a while and our mom passed away before we could come.   I felt  like coming home when we arrived in Florida. 

Marianne

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Ginny replied on Wed, Jul 16 2014 6:38 AM

Marianne,  It certainly appears like you made the right move to get to the U.S.  I am so glad that your family was able to make it here..    Please keep relating the tales of your life in Berlin and all.

I am so glad that your family  made it over here safely and that you feel at home.       Ginny

 

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Ginny,

Our kids are all grown up and healthy.  Yesterday son Chris had his 49th birthday.  He had only one bronchial asthma attack since we moved  to Florida.  I'm so relieved that he's well.  We did the right thing emigrating to Florida..

Marianne

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Ginny replied on Fri, Jul 18 2014 7:35 AM

Marianne, It is such a blessing that everything worked out so well for your family from your move.  You said that your youngest son turned 49?.  My youngest son turned 50 last December.  

Now I just have to ask this--- do you still have a German accent?  If you do, has it mingled with a southern accent too?  

I live in an area in Michigan that is fairly near an area that many, many German immigrants came to in the 1800's and the German accent is still very prominent in the area, but it is diminishing now somewhat with more immigrants having moved there from other areas.   Just go to one of the Lutheran churches in the area though, --It is still somewhat heavy.     Ginny

 

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Ginny,

Yes, I still have  a German accent, because I was 26 when we arrived.  Our children have no accent and my sister also has no German accent.  She is one of the rare folks that can mimic other persons voice.

I was somewhat shocked when we arrived, because my nieces age 7 and 4 didn't speak one word German. I didn't understand with our mother having babysat the girls.  When I started to babysit them I only spoke German in the house and it didn't take long for my nieces to learn to speak German without an accent.  My youngest niece actually passed the foreign language test at college without ever having to spent money on classes.

Our children are fluent in both languages and they did great in school. They all were on the national honor society in High school and they all got scholarships.  I believe that learning more than one language makes learning easier later on in life. 

Marianne  

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Ginny replied on Sat, Jul 19 2014 5:52 AM

Oh Marianne, I agree with you that it is always good to be fluent in more than 1 language.  In my family, when my Grandfather immigrated to the US from Germany, it was during the 1st world war and it was just not the thing to do, to speak German. So strictly English was spoken and I didn't get the advantage of 2 languages.     Ginny

 

 

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Thea replied on Sat, Jul 19 2014 7:38 AM

Marianne, I love the German language.  My Grandmother who was born here but lived in a home where they spoke French, German and English all the time taught me a few words when I would visit her and I took both German and French and Spanish in school.  I learned some Japanese when I lived there and I learned some Croatian when I lived in Croatia.  I think it is good to bring our home language with us and keep it alive but I do feel that when immigrants come to the USA that they learn and speak English here because that is the language of this country.  

to me, I feel if the phone say press 1 for English and 2 for Spanish that it should say 3 for German 4 for French 5 for Italian etcetera - 

I have an accent from all over the USA - different people pick up different words that I say and ask me all the time where I am from... I know now though that to speak like I did when a kid from NY that I have to stand real straight...:)  I don't speak that fast anymore - have slowed down from all my time in the south and midwest.

 

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Ginny, my heart goes out to your grandfather.  My mother lived through both world wars.  There are to many wars in this world, and the children always  pay the highest price.   My mom was born in 1902 and she was "rented" to farmers during the summer moth.  She only went to school in the winter month, just like all her siblings.  But when I went to school and I didn't know how to spell a word, I asked my mom and she knew.  She got a visa for one year to visit my sister in Ohio in 1961/62.  When my mom came back to Berlin she spoke English with an accent and she exchanged letters with an elderly lady in Ohio.   I asked my mom how she did learn English so fast, she replied that she had used a book and a dictionary and translated word for word.  My mom was 60 years old at the time.  If she could learn the language Mexicans can too. 

Marianne

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Ginny replied on Mon, Jul 21 2014 7:12 AM

Marianne,  I think at that time my grandfather, his mother and brother were just glad to get to safety.  Loosing the ability to speak German freely just didn't seem like that big of a deal.  But like I said, they moved to an area of Michigan that was heavily populated with German immigrants, so I think all of the people in that area learned to make English their language of choice as soon as possible so they weren't thought of as possible spies. 

I think that you mother did a wonderful job of learning English as well as she did in the short amount of time.  And I agree with you that the Mexicans could also learn English in a short amount of time and should be required to.

I always wanted to learn German, but I didn't know anyone, in my family, that remembered enough to teach me---- that is except my Grandma, from whom I only learned a couple of words from when the cow kicked her while she was milking it.   And I will say, that I got in trouble repeating what she said. So I quickly forgot those words.      Ginny

 

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Thea,

The German language is a bit more tricky to learn than English, but it's easy if a person grows up with it.  My DH and I used to vacation in Italy before we emigrated and I have to confess that I love the  language, because it's to musical.  We knew enough Italian to purchase bread, milk, butter and other groceries.  That's where we learned how to bigger about the price.  It was fun.  One year we vacationed in Terrachina (spell check)  a little town south of Rome and the lady there taught us the names for cutlery.  We also visited Venice.   We had fun in Italy.  We're trying to freshen up that language with CDs and we're also trying to learn some Mandarin Chinese.  That is a very difficult language, because the meaning of words change if the tone of the voice goes up or down.   It's a good thing that we're not visiting there, because we would be arrested for using bad language.

We had some embarrassing moments when we arrived in the USA.  I had learned the Queen's English in school.  It as about Peter Pim and Billy Ball.  Those two had a pencil box and it contained pencils, an ink pen and a rubber.   An eraser is also called a rubber in Australia.  The elastic band had broken in our little girls pants and we went to J C Pennies to purchase some.  I walked around in the sewing section of the store when a sales person asked if I needed help .  I told her that I was looking for a piece of rubber and I showed her the length. She looked strangely at the front of my DH pants and she answered that I was in the wrong department and called the manager.   I repeated my request for a piece of rubber  (ein Stueck Gummie) and he also tried to tell me that I was in the wrong department.  He finally asked what I wanted that piece of rubber for.  I told him to repair my daughters pants.  He told me that I was looking for elastic.    I have put my foot into my mouth with worth things.  Our landlord was also from Germany,  he was married to a wonderful lady from North Carolina.  One time I mixed up my words when I tried to tell my husband that I had been sawing the shipping  crates apart..  I said that I screwed all day to get the boxes apart and my landlady got  upset.  Later the landlord came over to give us a list of words we were not to use in public.   Marianne

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Thea replied on Mon, Jul 21 2014 12:29 PM

Marianne, I know that the stories you tell weren't funny when they happened but I am glad you are able to laugh about them now.  

My Grandmother taught me some German when I was little - she taught me words not to say when I went to Germany - which I have to say is a very beautiful country - I used to say if I had ever been stationed there long enough to bring my family over I might never have left.  I would have liked to have enough time to look up relatives - there and in Belgium.

 

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Thea,

I never took myself serious enough to get upset over  foot in mouth accidents.  I haven't told the biggest foot in mouth, that happened while fishing of a bridge in Ft Myers.   A seasoned angler had shown me how to put a shrimp on my hook without killing it.  We were all trying to catch Snooks.  You know  that in the German language  we make up nouns as we speak. The longest noun is a whole page long. I had mastered baiting my hook with the shrimps and one evening I held my hook with the shrimp up and I said:" Look everybody, I'm a master baiter".  My friend Carol asked if I was aware of what I just had said.   I told her that I had bragged about being a master in baiting my hook.  She told me that that wasn't what I had said and she explained.   Oh well, LOL!

Germany appears to be beautiful, because it's cleaner than most of America.  You hardly ever see trash on the beach, on the side of the road and so on.  If you go to Luxembourg, you'll find it even cleaner there. 

You wouldn't really like to live in Germany, because of the bureaucracy.  People working for the Government over in Germany are "Beamte"  and they do not act as if they're there to serve you.  They act as if they're doing you a favor to help you, unless you grease some hands.  If you change address in Germany, you have to go to the police station and register that change.   It's much nicer here, because the people act and treat you as if they're there to serve you.  The only thing better in Europe is the socialized health care.  Why?  Because everyone must be insured and the insurance companies  like to save money.  The whole system works on prevention, because it saves the insurance companies money.   I'll give you one example.   If a woman in Germany needs to have her uterus removed, the surgeon will sew the cervix and the bladder in place.  Everything stays in place for at least 30 years or longer.  I'm speaking from experience.  That means one anesthesia for many years.    Over here the surgeon does one proceeding at the time.  I know several woman who had their uterus removed and a short time later  the bladder came south.  That made another surgery and anesthesia necessary.    One is more profitable for the hospital and it's CEO and the other is much better for the patient.    Here is the web page for the hospital in Belin were my kids were born.  If you click on the British flag you can read all the information in English.   The other languages are German and Turkish.   There are a ton of Turks over there refusing to learn German. http://www.krankenhaus-waldfriede.de/krankenhaus/    Marianne

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Thea replied on Tue, Jul 22 2014 8:04 AM

Marianne - you are very funny lady.  I have made many mistakes like that over time and truly learned to laugh at myself when younger... I learned to really think quickly about what I was saying before i opened my mouth... But they are funny to relive.  

You register here when you move too - you just don't realize it but it is all connected now more then ever.  

Our insurance truly needs an upgrade to caring about the patient.  Doctors used to do that - but our government got involved and that took insurance away from being capitalistic - I had a hysterectomy 20 years ago and so far my bladder hasn't fallen - I guess it might be something I have to look forward to - or maybe my doctor took care of it - have absolutely no idea - I know he acidentally nicked it and I had to wear one of those bags while it healed and that was the beginning of my allergy to latex - can you imagine wearing one of those bags and being allergic to it - it was no fun - I had to have daily shots for almost the month that I was wearing it and anytime they told me I might have to be hospitalized  - absolutely no fun at all... 

I loved the small towns in Germany when I was there - I drove through them and it was fun seeing how the home yards were decorated... it was like the whole village was in a competition with who could make their yard the most beautiful - the hills driving through were awesome - reminded me of our state of Kentucky and West Virginia.... The greens were so green - everything I saw in Europe reminded me of a state here in the USA - see before I traveled to Europe and Asia I did travel the USA  - there are only 2 states here that I have not visited... I love some more then others - but I am truly in love with the USA - I think moreso then someone who hasn't been out of this country.  It is a wonderful place to live and I truly understand why so many want to come and live here... 

It hurts me a lot in the heart to hear what is happening around the world right now.  I saw the genocide in Yugoslavia when I was sent there when the country was splitting apart and can not imagine living like that - growing up all those years and then one day having your next door neighbor walk out his front door and start shooting at you.  I can not imagine having that happen here but am afraid that that is in our future too... they wont' want us to be at peace here... for some reason the evil is spreading... My heart has been hurting so much because of it all and I hope we can stay insulated until I leave this earth but am so afraid that it is going to happen sooner rather then later.   I hope so much that history is not repeating itself... but it tends to do that...

Back to pretty things... when I lived in Thule Greenland I got to experience the prettiest sight in the spring - the countryside bloomed with the prettiest little black flowers - they were so pretty.  Each place I have lived I have taken pretty pictures home with me - most in my mind's memory but some I got on film... And we had these cute little artic foxes - we called them Archies - they molted in the summer and looked like hairless rats for a while but they were so cute in the winter with their different coats of many colors.  And I got to see polar bears - our base did not have any fences so our walls were 10' thick to protect us from the polar bears - they never came into our base while I was there but I did get to see them from the tower(I was an air traffic controller)... 

So many many wonderful memories!

Thank you for sharing your wonderful story - you Master hook baiter!  teehee :)

 

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