Top 10 Posters

I want to show of my Singer 201-2

rated by 0 users
Not Answered This post has 0 verified answers | 61 Replies | 10 Followers

Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560
Marianne Nowicki posted on Thu, Jul 10 2014 5:10 AM

My Singer was "born" in 1948, she's 5 years younger than I am and she sews like a sewing machine should.  she has been cleaned and oiled and she looks good to me.  I finished a pillow case on her and she didn't balk at the several layers of material when I made the French seam over the piping and the sleeve.  I had looked at a Featherweight, but the bobbin placement is a bit to difficult for me to manage exchanging bobbins etc with my left hand. 

My singer 201 has the bobbin case on top and that's easier for me.   The singer 201 came with an instruction booklet and when I opened it, I saw the name Rose Loveless written inside on the first page.  I'm guessing that she was owned by a Rose, before she came to Marianne?  Look at her pretty face :-)

  • | Post Points: 140

All Replies

Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560

Thea,

I'm sorry that you're having such a hart time.  I hope that things will change for the better very soon.

 

We know all about hard times.  We emigrated in 1969, my mom was supposed to babysit my sister's and our kids.  Our mom passed away the day we left Berlin, I was two days to late to see my mother alive. . My DH went to work with a dictionary to ask for the right tools.  He grew up under Russian occupancy, no English.   After we exchanged our money we had $1000.- and we had to give that to my sister to help with mom's hospital and funeral bills.

By 1975 we had moved into our modest own house, but with no vacationers in S FL we had hardly any income.  We tried to sell the house, but the Government had build a self help housing  group one street over and our house didn't sell.  My DH got a job offer in Tallahassee and we moved here. We rented the house in Ft Myers, but the people forgot to pay the rent, so we had to pay that mortgage and the payment for a lot with an old mobile home.  The kids needed clothing food  and money was very tight.  We counted every penny before spending and ten years later the house in Ft Myers was sold and we had saved up enough money to build a home on the by now paid for property.  At that time the kids needed help with college costs and we were still counting every penny and I used every coupon I had cut out.   We went to night school and we both got our American High School diploma.  My DH worked until he was 72, mainly to keep me insured until I  turned 65.  He has a good social security check and he also get social security from Germany, where he had also worked.  Now we can afford to buy some wish items.  Marianne

  • | Post Points: 80
Top 10 Contributor
Female
13,602 Posts
Points 178,383
Marie replied on Sun, Jul 13 2014 10:01 AM

Marianne Nowicki:
We know all about hard times. 

Marianne, your story is amazing!  God Bless you for getting through all those hardships!  (((((HUGS)))))

Millbury, MA

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
5,824 Posts
Points 123,495

Marianne, what a fascinating story. Thank you for sharing.


In the beautiful Pacific Northwest!

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 500 Contributor
Female
227 Posts
Points 3,640
Deb replied on Sun, Jul 13 2014 12:02 PM

Marianne, thanks for sharing!!! May you and your DH have many lovely hrs sewing and just being together !!

Deb

🌺 You know you are a quilter when the only scraps under your table are fabric.🐾

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Female
701 Posts
Points 13,295
Michelle replied on Sun, Jul 13 2014 12:59 PM

Marianne, 

  What a story!  We are a family of immigrants but 2 generations back and their stories of hard work to get here are very encouraging to us.  I also come from a very poor background, but thru hard work and schooling have done pretty well for our family.   I also love to sew and now am able to sew just for the love of it, instead of making all our clothes from necessity, even though I have always loved to sew and do hand work.  Thank you for your story. .  

Michelle B
Enjoy family, friends and hobbies

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
13,605 Posts
Points 247,072
Thea replied on Sun, Jul 13 2014 1:44 PM

Marianne, Your story is very impressive.  what a family can do coming to America.. that it can be a good life with hard work and integrity.  I applaud your family and pray that it conitinues to work out well for you.  

My family are immigrants but we came back in the 1800s to America - One side of my family is from Germany/Austria/France... the other side is Belgium, Scotland & England.  I am actually lucky to ever have been born  My Great Grandfather was a Priest that went to Africa to do missionary work and something happened there to him.  When he came back he gave up his priesthood and came to America where he met and married my Great Grandmother... On the other side my Great Grandmother was the illigitimate daughter to the King of France and her family was sent to America.  All of it amazes me when I remember the stories I was told as a child.  

One of my other Great Grandfather's started a stain glass window business in Ohio and it is still run by family today.  I always thought that I got my love of quilting from him as I feel putting together a stain glass window is similar to putting together a quilt.  I hope someday to be able to visit that business on one of my trips east.  

My husband's family comes from the native American's.  He has both a full blooded Cherokee and a full blooded Choctaw for Great Grandmother's.  The rest of his family came from the England shores.  His family was dirt poor growing up - he remembers the hardships of growing up.  He has come a long ways too!  He is the love of my life and my very best friend.  Our marriage has been hardwork as he followed me around the world from base to base in the Air Force.  But we wouldn't change it for anything.  

I am not sure how you feel about the immigrants coming across our borders to the south right now.  I know I wish that they would have come in the correct and right way but now that they are here I feel that we should blend them in to our country and get them citizenship so that they aren't living on our hard earned monies... 

I ask that you not have sympathy for me - but just pray for me - I do have tons of pain each day but that is my life - other then that I am blessed.  I look around and think  to myself - there but for the Grace of God go I.  I am lucky to live in the USA and proud to be an American.  I am not sure how I would handle it living in some of the countries that I have visited and worked where they are worried about bombs every day and worried about the religion that they practice if it will get them in trouble - or as a woman that I could be stoned/beaten or just killed for doing something that a man thinks is wrong.

It is summer and a very good time for me... nope don't like these storms coming through so much this summer but am a very happy individual - I have a couple sewing machines that allow me to make quilts and to sew for my DIL/DS and DGC.  I am blessed.

Sending some hot hot hot Oklahoma weather to all who need it... and sending the thunder away too!   :)

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560

Marie, it was a great adventure for us  because we knew that we wouldn't have to ask for Welfare.  My DH employer in Berlin had reassured us that he would send us plain tickets home IF we couldn't make it here. My DH is a very well trained Craftsman and his boss hated to loose him.   The strangest thing happened to me when we arrived in Florida.  I can't logical explain it, but I knew the place, I had the feeling I had come home?    Thanks for the HUGS and ((((((((((((((HUGS))))))))))))) back to you.  Marianne

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560

Michelle,

We're not the first to immigrate  to the USA.  At the end of 1800  my maternal grandmother's sister had married a man with the last name Gutknecht and they emigrated to New York.   Grandma's sister send us care packages during the War.   Grandma passed away in 1949 and  my mother kept contact with the family.   My mom emigrated in 1966, to live with my sister.   We lost contact after mom passed away.  Marianne 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
13,605 Posts
Points 247,072
Thea replied on Mon, Jul 14 2014 7:07 AM

Marianne, Have you tried to re-establish contact with that side of your family?

I never knew my paternal grandfather's side of the family when I was growing up - he passed before I was born - I also have never met anyone on my paternal grandmother's side.  

I have met members on my paternal grandfathers side since I grew up and had a family of my own - that is one of the biggest reasons that I want to move to MN - I want my grandkids to know me - a big part of my thoughts!

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560

Thea,

what an interesting family you have.   The illegal emigrants coming are just like ants coming for the sugar the government dishes out.  Many come over to birth their children here and there is welfare.  In 1969, wen we came, we had to sign legal documents that we wouldn't apply for welfare.  Nowadays legal emigrants get welfare, food stamps and lots of them get free housing, while may soldiers who  have served are homeless.  Whoever changed the law, that people can receive welfare  without having paid into the system should be  tarred and feathered.  It bugs me, just like we're having to press a number to listen in Spanish.  All other emigrants have managed to learn English.  If people come here, they should learn the language or go back where they came from.  Or there should be a button to press for every other emigrant's language.  Marianne

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560

Thea, we did send them a letter telling them that our mother (their cousin) had passed away.  We never received a reply.  

 I was busy baby sitting 5 kids.   I recall going to the Wonder Bread store every Wednesday, when they sold 5 older loaves of bread for $1.-  The sales lady asked me if the kids all belonged to me.  She thought I needed to be pitied.  I had a good time with the kids.  Small children might step on our toes, while older kids  often stomp right into our heart.  right now we're enjoying the grandkids.  They still give hugs and kisses.  :-)

Marianne

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
13,605 Posts
Points 247,072
Thea replied on Mon, Jul 14 2014 7:52 AM

Marianne, It is just breaking my heart right now to learn about the reduction in forces - I lived through something similar in the 90s when I was still on active duty *had not retired yet ... and it was hard - those around me wondering if they were going to have a job next year or not... most getting the boot are good soldiers and have families with small children - it is hard for them to move into a work force that is over taxed with the amount of people looking for work... and then our president is asking for 3.7 billion dollars for these children coming over our borders - I heard where that is 67 million per child -  and it is all free to them - the soldiers getting the boot will not be getting freebies like that... they will be struggling and a lot hopefully will have family that will be able to help them.  

When a soldier gets the boot like this they have to find a job but they also have to find a place to live as they are kicked out of base housing - so they get minimal pay and usually don't have a savings account cuz how can you save money on what you get paid - so they now have to worry about the bills that they have accrued - they have to worry about new bills in the housing department - and they have to worry about new schools for the kids - 

No - these kids on the border - no matter that their home lives are maybe not good - we don't know whether they are or not - but they need to be taken care of by their own governments - we need to take care of our OWN first!  

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Female
13,605 Posts
Points 247,072
Thea replied on Mon, Jul 14 2014 8:00 AM

Marianne Nowicki:

Thea, we did send them a letter telling them that our mother (their cousin) had passed away.  We never received a reply.  

 I was busy baby sitting 5 kids.   I recall going to the Wonder Bread store every Wednesday, when they sold 5 older loaves of bread for $1.-  The sales lady asked me if the kids all belonged to me.  She thought I needed to be pitied.  I had a good time with the kids.  Small children might step on our toes, while older kids  often stomp right into our heart.  right now we're enjoying the grandkids.  They still give hugs and kisses.  :-)

Marianne

I truly applaud you and you should be on television telling the newscasters how it really should be done... how it should be done RIGHT.  

I don't know the story of why my family emigrated to the USA - I wish I did... I just know that they came here - most in the early 1800s.  I have found copies of their service records that makes me so proud.  I do wish I had known them when I was young.  

I know our lives get so busy with day to day cares and it isn't until we are this age that we have time to stop and wonder about things.  I do wish though that I had grown up with my family all in the same city so that I could have known them... but then I wouldn't be the me I am today if I had... if that had happened I probably would be wishing for less family...:)  

I am sorry that your cousins never answered your letter... maybe it got lost in the mail - we never know.  I know my cousin (a lot removed) never answered my email message that I sent about the business in Ohio that I wanted to visit it... he may be afraid that I was wanting part of the business after so many years but I don't - I just wanted to learn what he could tell me about our Great Grandfather's craft.  I still hope someday to be able to travel there and just walk through the building and see it for myself.  dreams right!

 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
3,606 Posts
Points 52,025
Ginny replied on Mon, Jul 14 2014 11:01 AM

Marianne, I had to laugh at your mention of pressing 2 for spanish,  I got a message line last week that wanted me to press 1 for "English" or 2 for "Spanish"   Now that really upset me.  I know that when my maternal grandparents arrived from Germany, they weren't given that choice, but oh, that's right, there weren't phones for them to use in the late 1800's, but accomodations weren't given for their lack of English language knowledge.  They just stayed in their own groups until they learned the language from someone who had been here longer.    Ginny

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 200 Contributor
Female
301 Posts
Points 4,560

Thea, when we came, there was still a draft and my DH registered.  He was turned down because of his age or the lack of the English language?  My son wanted to join the air force when he graduated.  He also was turned down, because one of his eye balls isn't round.  I'm not making this up.  He took flying lessons and got his pilot license  with that eye ball. 

I put you on my prayer list.  I hope it will easy your discomforts.  I know first hand that prayer can work miracles.

Marianne

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 3 of 5 (62 items) < Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next > | RSS
Have a Question? | About Us | Privacy Policy | Join Today © 2014 F+W All rights reserved.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use