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Color coordination made simple

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Mamagshouse Donna Gilliam Posted: Sat, Apr 12 2014 11:24 PM

When trying to design your next quilt and you need an easy way to find the color coordinating fabrics you want to use just go to the paint department and grab some color samples their free. That's what I do. Maybe it will help you too. 

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Roxana replied on Sun, Apr 13 2014 4:01 AM

Great tip! Thanks for sharing!

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Patti replied on Sun, Apr 13 2014 8:03 AM

Thanks mamag.  will have to try that.

 

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Candis replied on Sun, Apr 13 2014 8:14 AM

Your coming up with all sorts of fun interesting tips thank you!

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Agnes replied on Sun, Apr 13 2014 8:43 AM

I had lunch with a friend the other day. She kept mentioning my great color sense abut that she was having difficulty getting the right hues, tones, shades or whatever in her water color painting. I could give her a number of hints. We owned a hardware store complete with the paint tinting machine so not only are your color cards a great hint but I learned various hints in our seminars to help have satisfied customers. The hint I use the most is to not look at any of those colors up close and personal.but to back off, step back and look at the overall effect from anywhere from 6 to 10 feet away. This is the normal viewing range whether it is painted walls or finished quilt.

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Candis replied on Sun, Apr 13 2014 10:22 AM

Thanks Agnes, I will take all the tips I can get! This is a great one!

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Brenda replied on Sun, Apr 13 2014 11:57 AM

 Agnes,

Thank you on your comments on backing away from color and quilts to see the over all effect. I think this really going to help me.  I was looking at the fabric or quilt to close.

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Thank you all.

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Roxana replied on Fri, Apr 25 2014 11:36 AM

Agnes:

...  I could give her a number of hints. We owned a hardware store complete with the paint tinting machine so not only are your color cards a great hint but I learned various hints in our seminars ... The hint I use the most is to not look at any of those colors up close and personal.but to back off, step back and look at the overall effect from anywhere from 6 to 10 feet away. This is the normal viewing range whether it is painted walls or finished quilt.

Agnes, thanks for the tip. Can you share with us any of the other hints you learned in your seminars? I'm working on a color class for 2015 and I could use those tips!

 

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Agnes replied on Fri, Apr 25 2014 2:58 PM

I can't say that this came from the color classes but the other hint I use a lot is that most quilters are too caught up in wanting to match everything. I know many like to use a line of fabric exclusively because the matching is done for them. That can lead to some very boring quilts. The way I choose potential fabrics is lay the bolts out keeping the amounts in mind. If you have far more of one fabric than another in the design that becomes your top fabric. Now lay that bolt across the rest. Next 2 steps: Step back from this arrangement and look at it. Clerks in a fabric store may look at you with a cross eye. If doing this at home it is easier to just let this pile stew for a day or two, adding or subtracting fabrics as you look at it in natural light, bright light, natural light, even different types of  artificial light.. To see if you have contrast my preferred method is to take a photo but view it in black and white. The quilts I am happiest with are the ones where there is a fabric that "works' but in technicality is off a bit. It gives the final quilt some punch. Hope there is something helpful in this ramble of mine.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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Roxana replied on Fri, Apr 25 2014 3:25 PM

it is very useful. Thank you!

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Brenda replied on Fri, Apr 25 2014 7:30 PM

My Local QS is wonderful I am a newer quilter longtime sewer I tend to be matchy matchy, they help me so much they actual lay the bolts down and have you walk away so you can see them from far away.  I just push for help know where everywhere I go.

 

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Agnes, I always enjoy your hints and tips. You seem to have learned much about color and how to apply it when selecting quilting fabrics. It's very informative and helpful. Thank you!    kathy

 

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Wow some great tips and hints. Way to go everyone.

 

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Agnes replied on Fri, May 2 2014 4:33 PM

Just thought of another exercise that can help you become more comfortable with making color choices. Take a piece of quite busy patterned and colorful wallpaper, fabric or something similar. Now go through your fabrics and pull out anything that is similar to any color in the original. Mix up styles, designs, other somewhat busy fabric, tone on tones, even solids if you work with them. Hopefully you come up with dozens of different swatches. Remove your original piece, narrow down the remainder to half a dozen or so in a grouping. If they worked with the original they should work together now. You might be amazed at some combinations you would never have given a thought. To have a quilt with movement mix different scales and types of designs to keep it from getting boring. IMHO  working with only one line of fabric may be easy but very boring.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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