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Routine sewing machine maintenance

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Sherry posted on Sun, Dec 15 2013 8:14 PM

 I am just wondering how many people routinely have their sewing machines professionally cleaned and maintenance and how often.

 

           sherry

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Mz M replied on Sun, Dec 15 2013 8:31 PM

once a year. the way I look at it paying for the cleaning and adjusting is an insurance policy. I have had my Brother Esante for about 17 years now with no major issues. I only use someone who has come to my attention by word of mouth as doing excellent work. and then I only take it to the same person - kinda like going to the Dr. - he/she gets to know your machine. Hope this answers your question.

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I am of the persuasion, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." LOL. I clean my machine's bobbin area out of lint every time I use it. I have a machine that doesn't require oiling.

It wasn't always that way. I used to take it in ever six months, until one time I took it in and it came back with issues that it didn't have before. Fortunately it was something I could fix myself and led me to think of what I first posted.... 

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gini replied on Sun, Dec 15 2013 8:36 PM

once or twice a year depending on how much use it is getting.  i clean my bobbin area all the time

gini in north idaho

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I'm supposed to take mine in for a clean-lube-adjust once a year, but at $85 a shot, I have been slack.  I keep my machine clean (no more canned air!) and give it the recommended one drop of oil with each bobbin change, and she's been running like a top!


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I have had my machine for 8 years, I never thought about taking it in till someone told me I should. I am thinking of taking it in this year after I get My Christmas sewing done.  

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I never took my machine in for cleaning in the past, but I bought a new machine a few years ago and thought I would do what I am suppose to and did. All I can say, is if you don't, you don't know what you are missing! When I get mine back it's like a new machine. Just wanted to add......I sew every day.

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I never took my machine in for cleaning in the past, but I bought a new machine a few years ago and thought I would do what I am suppose to and did. All I can say, is if you don't, you don't know what you are missing! When I get mine back it's like a new machine. Just wanted to add......I sew every day.

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Agnes replied on Mon, Dec 16 2013 10:00 AM

I think the frequency of service calls can also depend on the machine. I use a Singer 20 U machine, professional or industrial machine. The workings are simple, no bells and whistles. I had an issue with it when I dropped the head while moving. I phoned a repairman and he stated that it was simple enough that if I had a mechanical minded person around he should be able to fix it. If not, he n=would make a house call. The reason I dropped the head only was that the weight was more than I could safely handle while trying to put it back into the motor stand and it dropped just a few inches but the way it dropped it hit the shaft and pushed it out of place. I managed to procure a repair manual and between my son and me we got it back to work. Now since then I purchased a new inexpensive machine to have for some applique work and back up. All the mechanisms are sealed and there is no way that if I were using it all the time I wouldn't have to take it in for service and cleaning. Sometimes you have to analyse your particular situation.

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Sherry replied on Mon, Dec 16 2013 10:39 AM

Yeah, I guess I'll keep doing it, then. Here it costs around $100 and right now they will have it 4 weeks. It's the only sewing machine I have so I hate not having it for that long

       sherry

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Rhonnie replied on Mon, Dec 16 2013 11:14 AM

My dad does the cleaning about every 6 months on my older machines. He does though cleaning on my new machine. He says he wants to be sure I have them kept up so there isn't any problems. I will add yes I do clean them after most projects or once a month it goes with few other monthly chores. I will take my new machine in in Feb for its professional cleaning due to it keeps the value of exchange up....like that will happen lol. I know when my machines are clean they work sooo much better.

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Rhonnie replied on Mon, Dec 16 2013 11:15 AM

You have to make dad feel needed even after you grow up :-)

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On my domestic machine, I clean the bobbin area every couple bobbin changes, more often if using a fabric that gives off a lot of lint. I've never thought about taking it to someone to be cleaned. What all do they do?

 

 

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gini replied on Mon, Dec 16 2013 11:53 AM

I think they take the outside off and clean everything and oil what needs to be oiled.  All those gears need lubrication.  Once he got a whole snarl of fluff and thread out of my tension gears.  My machine runs more smoothly after it comes back.   On e time, though the repairman broke something inside.  He was a new guy.  He thought it wasn't his problem so he lost my business for the next several decades.

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Patti replied on Tue, Dec 17 2013 9:05 AM

I've heard once a year.   Just took mine in after about 3 or 4 years.  Doing it sooner would have been better.  But last time I did a fancy stitch the poor little butterfly had one wing not attached.  The machine is back, running beautifully and wings attached.  I love my machine.

Before starting any new project I clean the bobbin area, change needles.  Check your manual for instructions.  Some don't want oil, or at least advise that oiling should be done by the professional.  My previous machines called for oiling periodically, which I did do.

Patti

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