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Why dont quilters have a national organization that monitors their prices and makes them standard like the other crafters?

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Carey Posted: Thu, Aug 22 2013 10:42 PM

My question was spawned by the various differenes in pricing you see on other quilts online as well as in person. So it is a discussion and I want to know why you think we don't have an organization that helps us with pricing and other issues. Why is there no standard pricing for the basic quilts even, etc?

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Leslie replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 5:10 AM

I personally don't feel i need a organization to put a price on a quilt I have made.   It was my time and fabric, my ideal  it should be the price I feel its worth

[Ava, Missouri

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Patti replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 6:33 AM

what other crafters have this?  For the most part, crafts are undersold.  With the exception of those who have made a name for themselves.

I have seen suggested guidelines, but even then the value is difficult to determine.

Patti

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I must agree with Leslie and Patty. I would never want to be limited by an outside entity telling me what my work is worth in monetary terms. If I am the designer, creator of a piece of art, then who should say what it is worth?

 We as crafter, and I am one, do not need to be monitored by anyone but ourselves. 

I do what I do to enjoy the process. I sew, quilt, & machine embroidery. Each of these crafts I make money on, I price my work as custom for that person who is ordering, therefore it is her need that drives me to do what I do.

My time is money whether it be shopping for supplies or  tools necessary to do the job right, to MY specification, only.

Plus lets not forget our education. The knowledge that we have, the years of practice, the many lessons learned along the road to success, it is all wrapped up pretty in a forever artistic endeavor. DO NOT sell us short.

good to be back!


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Carey replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 9:46 AM

There was a discussion somewhere either in another quilting group that pretty much said all of us are underselling ourselves unless we have gained notoriety. That other crafters in the non quilting world are charging 15 an hour for labor. It was not to undersell us it was to tell us that we are dong that to ourselves normally because we do not charge enough. In particular if you sew by hand you should be close to the amish prices that they charge if your work is really good.

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Carey replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 10:00 AM

We are all undervaluing the work and I'm sorry if you misunderstood the discussion. An example is a queen size quilt that took 8 hours to piece and 8 hours to quilt it all together. Most quilters are only charging about 200 to maybe 300 tops. It should be 420 for that quilt unless you got it done quicker than that time.

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Agnes replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 10:26 AM

About five years ago I was approached to make a queen quilt. I quoted $500 and had the job. After being able to get into her head to figure out her color preferences I had free reign. Yet I made that quilt with the fear that she wouldn't like it. Upon delivery it was WOW, WOW, WOW. After that I decided I would sell quilts I made but not on consignment. Anything I sell is just for extra blow money and not to make a living and always to friends.

I also don't think we need a controlling board. We do our crafts for various reasons. My biggest reason is the mental stability and well being it gives me. Otherwise I would be a pill pushing Mama and not a quilting granny.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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zoetc49 replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 10:31 AM

I know I made a quilt for a friend and just the materials alone and having someone put it together for me cost me $400.00, this does not include my time. If I were to sell this quilt I would want $600.00 for it, but what I want and what I would get are two different entities. I look on ebay all the time for others selling quilts, and no one wants to buy one for the real price. 

Quilts are fun to make for others, or ourselves, and who can put a value on that?  

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Dani replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 11:12 AM

I agree, I have researched the idea of starting a business and unfortunately people just arent willing to pay for a good quality hand-made quilt when they can go to Wal-Mart and buy one for $80. (While it's not as beautiful and reliable, it's definitely more fiscally practical).

If I make enough to cover my next project then I suppose that is fine by me =) However I have had several co-workers approach me about making queen/king size quilts for them, and I honestly have NO CLUE what price to give them. I informed them that supplies alone are expensive, and I would want to charge for my time as well, but they are telling me to name a price. Does anybody have any ideas on what would be fair?

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Julienne replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 11:34 AM

Dani:

If I make enough to cover my next project then I suppose that is fine by me =) However I have had several co-workers approach me about making queen/king size quilts for them, and I honestly have NO CLUE what price to give them. I informed them that supplies alone are expensive, and I would want to charge for my time as well, but they are telling me to name a price. Does anybody have any ideas on what would be fair?

Hi Dani, I do have my own Business on the side. HA I do more charity work then Business work so I am not sure now which way I want the business to go anymore. But First you charge for your supplies. All the way down to Thread. You charge for your time. You need to keep a log of hours spent on the quilt. If this is a pre-order ask for a deposit first of at least $100 to at least not to bite so hard into your pocket book when you go get some of the supplies. Only you can decide what you feel your time is worth.  The Amish charge up to 1200 for their Hand quilted queen size quilts, so do not be afraid to put a price of 500 on it if it is for friends. You can only drum up more business if they truly like it. . In all honesty. None of here can tell you what to charge or what not to charge. Supplies cost different in every state unless you order on line. Only you can be the judge of your work and price it. I am sure you do wonderful work or your friends would not want you to make quilts for them. Have fun with it. And don't panic.

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Leslie replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 11:47 AM

Dani, I have a good friend who owns a quilt shop and she tells me she charges so much per hour you spend making the quilt, you would just have you decide how much your time is worth to you per hour.

[Ava, Missouri

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gini replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 11:49 AM

dani.  if you are buying all new fabric to make the quilt, you will have at least $100 in fabric, not including batt, thread etc. so i would let them know there is at least $200 in supplies on top of your time.   then let them know about how many hours it will take you to make the quilt, and be up front that you aren't sure how much your time is worth. when you tell them you will have a minimum of 50 hours in quilt and you think $10 per hour isn't out of line. let them do the math.   if they want the quilt bad enough, they will ask you to make it.    but, if you have to purchase all the materials up front,  i don't think $200 is out of line for a non-refundable deposit.    then,  if they don't like the quilt, you aren't out of pocket. 

gini in north idaho

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Leslie replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 11:52 AM

Carey, I think you have brought up a good topic, 

[Ava, Missouri

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I agree Gini, that is what I did and will do if ever I am commissioned to make one again.  Good advice.

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Carey replied on Fri, Aug 23 2013 2:58 PM

I understand where you are coming from but many of the people do not charge for their labor at all or very little compared to others. I have sold one quilt to an acquaintance but it was nowhere near 500 for a queen it was like 225. I wish I could sell some for 500. I do have a person who says she will buy the fabric and materials with me and has seen Amish prices on quilts said she would pay me 200 to do the quilt. I think that is the best I have found so far is if they come with you to get the fabric and then give you a comparision quote on your labor. Not all consumers or friends etc. work this way though.

As to your question about what you should charge I have heard if they are a very close friend to charge double the cost of the materials. If it is a stranger or just acquaintance to charge 3x cost of materials. As you can see per discussion though there are a wide variety of different prices online and that makes it hard to sell your quilt someone who does not know about the actual cost of quilting from other sourc

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