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Did You Work on a Quilt Today? #9

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Ginny replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 5:43 AM | Locked

Karla, I will say that I haven't actually seen him roll over yet, but my granddaughter warned me.  So I won't just be laying him in the middle of the bed and think he will be safe for a month or so yet.   LOL    Ginny

 

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Thea replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 7:59 AM | Locked

SpringerMom:

Hi Thea, I was reading your posts about your quilts, and was wondering about your statement: "....when I am basting right on that seam to make sure it is all the same direction as I do not press open." 

I've wondered about the seam(s) on a pieced backing and whether it is better to press to one side as on the quilt top, or to press this seam open? I'd appreciate your thoughts on it. And the thoughts of anyone else who has experience either way.  Thanks! kathy  

Kathy, I have watched programs where quilters press their seams open and talk about doing it and the reasons... I disagree with them... I think you give more stabilization to the seam by pressing it over to one side.  I have looked at my DH's grandmothers quilts to see how she did it because the reason I have heard that it was done was to keep it easier to stitch the 1/4" to a side if you didn't have to go through all those layers and have found that she sewed through them and pressed to a side... 

To me it makes that seam less likely to come apart if it isn't stressed which is what I think pressin open does... and I have not seen that it as any different with the ability to hand quilt through it - when I hand quilted I pressed to the side... 

The reason that I make sure that all seams are pressed in one direction is that I found when I hung a quilt in a window that the sun coming through the backing to the front showed me which direction my seams were pressed and when one was twisted I could see that and I didn't like that it looked "messy" to me... I have a form of OCD in that I am a perfectionist... Kay Woods would have called me a pointed person... 

I do, also, use a very tight stitch.  My Janome the stitch is 2.2 on my Pfaff it is 2.5... it is very difficult to rip out so you don't want to make a mistake but it helps me to "believe" that my seams won't come apart... and whether it be true or not - I think they are stronger when pressed one direction instead of pressed open...

 

Debbi-Do - your quilt is adorable and I am simply amazed at how quickly you got it done.  You are awesome!!!  That Big Brother is going to be so thrilled - did you get him a big brother shirt to go with his quilt?

 

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 9:32 AM | Locked

Thea, beautiful quilts and your backs are wonderful!  Great work, as usual!

Millbury, MA

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 9:35 AM | Locked

Thea:

I finished one more quilt this weekend... only 2 left to do bindings on - this one I started at retreat last year and it has a simple backing of one fabric.

Love this one, Thea!  Is the holly appliquéd?

 

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 9:40 AM | Locked

Angele, great baby quilt, love those borders!

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 9:43 AM | Locked

Karla:
Do you think I'll ever catch up, especially since I'm babysitting and a Grandma's Taxi Service?

I have no doubt, Karla.  Bless your heart for all you do and still have time for your passion, quilting.

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 9:57 AM | Locked

Ginny:

Oh I hear you Karla.  I am going to start babysitting my new GGS tomorrow.  All day every week for who knows how long.  He was a preemie-  Born on Feb 10th and not due to be born until April 4th.  He now weighs 7lb. 7 oz. and is 20 inches long. He was 4lb 9oz and 17 inches long at birth and he rolls over already.  Doesn't matter which way he rolls both ways.  This is going to be exciting, but I think very tiring too.  I think my quilting is going to suffer.     Ginny

 

Ginny, bless you for babysitting your GGS!  When he naps, you nap, that's how I did it when I babysat my granddaughter and that was 17 years ago when I was 59.  Couldn't do it full time at my age although I wish I could, those were some of the best years of my life.

He's growing by leaps and bounds, rolling over and all, God Bless him!  Pics, we want pics!

 

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 10:00 AM | Locked

Bonita, bless you too!  Aren't Grams great?

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Marie replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 10:05 AM | Locked

Debbie-do, I love your quilt and your quilting is very nicely done, good job!  Congrats to your HGS!

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Quiltless replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 11:51 AM | Locked

HOW OLD IS YOUR UFO 

By 

Quiltless

  

1.  In a moment of nostalgia in November 2006, Quiltless recalls her Grandmother spending time embroidering and quilting with her in 1953-1954.  Embroidery was done with shanks of embroidery floss and a fat needle using a hand held hoop.  Quilting was done with a pencil, yardstick and scissors and then a needle, thread and hoop.  Quiltless is awed by the new sewing technology and decides to buy an embroidery/sewing/quilting machine on eBay.  The embroidery machine has a patented stitch that looks like hand quilting.  

2.  Early 2007, Quiltless has a friend who shows her how to do a simple rag quilt.  It is a good beginning quilters project.

 3.  Summer 2007, Quiltless decides to make 3 or 4 small baby-blanket sized rag quilts for the couch so the young Labrador’s claws won’t scratch the leather.  Quiltless and DH go to Joann’s to buy the fabric.  DH has provided a plastic gift card the size of a credit card.  

4.  Quiltless doesn’t know how calculate yardage so she buys 2 - 3 yards of eleven different fabrics.  Thankfully, the fabric is 100% cotton, but only because Joann’s had a quilter’s section.  On the advice of a friend, she bought flannel for batting; lots and lots of it!

 5.  Quiltless spends the next couple of years learning to use a rotary cutter and mat; cutting over 500 six and a half inch squares. 

 6.  In 2012, Quiltless finishes sewing around the edges using a half inch seam allowance. 

 7.  In January 2014, Quiltless finishes sewing the Xs through the 500 squares.

 8.  In March 2014, Quiltless randomly laid out some of the blocks, six across and seven down for the first pad.  She sewed the individual blocks together in rows.

 9.  On April 7, 2014, Quiltless sewed the rows together -- it took a week.  The batting made the folded sections very thick and a denim needle was used.

 10.  In 2014, Quiltless planned to do the fringe cutting and other pads later.  The UFO goes back in the recycled plastic, zippered blanket bag and back into the big, latched plastic Sterilite bin.  

11.  In 2016, Quiltless decides the rag quilt would look better with more squares of the floral print.  Quiltless has searched all over the internet and can’t find the fabric.

12.  The young Labrador is now an old dog.  It no longer jumps on the couch.  

13.  In 2017, Quiltless decides to abandon the unclipped first pad and make the remaining pads with a different floral print.  An Amazon drone delivers the fabric.

14.  In 2019, Quiltless cuts the six and a half inch squares using a machine that uses laser for cutting.  No more rotary cutter and mat. 

15.  In 2020, Quiltless, whose eyesight is fading, still notices that the new fabric is the new quilters quality fabric.  New manufacturing processes make it  substantially different from what was available in 2007.     

16.  In 2022, Quiltless decides to abandon the coarse flannel batting and go with a lighter batting.  Due to the wars, raging inflation, oil prices skyrocketing, cotton prices skyrocketing and other reasons, she can only get small amounts of cotton yardage.  She speaks to her whole-house computer and a drone arrives that afternoon with a yard of fabric and a barcode for future orders.  Supplies are not guaranteed and the product warnings are now the size of a catalog.  Lot matching is not a problem because all manufacturing is computerized;  Just send a swatch and photo back and it is custom made.  Fabric is 199~ (global digital credits) a yard.  Money is no longer used, even in credit cards.  The US dollar is no longer the currency standard, a global digital credit system is used.  You no longer have to remember your user name and password.  It is all done by retinal scan.  

17.  In 2027, cotton yardage and batting are no longer available to the individual consumer.  The US military was downsized because of the national debt.  The US military no longer ensures US interests abroad.  Shipping lanes are highways of piracy.  Anyone expecting a commercial delivery system to deliver such raw goods to individual consumers is considered selfish and out of touch.  The new generation is taught that the individual consumerism of the previous generations was the cause of the wars that nearly devastated the planet.  The rag quilt goes back into the Sterilite bin, never to be seen again in Quiltless’s lifetime.

18.  In 2100, the squares, fabric and sewing notions are being passed through the generations as a family treasure.  No one remembers Quiltless except for her UFO.

19.  In 2200, a family member sold the UFO to an antiquity fiber arts collector.  The collector (we no longer use gender based pronouns like he or she) put it in a vault. 

20.  The collector died and the estate administrator didn’t know about the vault.  It remains in the vault like a time capsule.  

21.  In the year 2525, if man is still alive, if woman can survive, they may find … the vault with the Sterilite bin.  

22.  Now it has been 10,000 years.  The next ice age is receding.  The archaeologists found the Sterilite box.  They tried carbon dating and it appears to be circa 2000; a great find of historical significance.  Someone tried to make something out of real natural fibers.  This was before things were learned by swallowing a pill.  An article is placed in the Journal of Archeology.

23.  Children try to remember the start date for a history test.

24.  It is in a hermetically sealed in a glass case in the International Federation's Colony, Planet Genoa's -  Smithsonian as an example of something called “quilting”:  a quaint activity of the Earth based American Tribe. 

(It is still an UnFinished Object!) 

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Judy T-Bellingham replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 12:12 PM | Locked

Kath, I loved this and just had to print it to read again.  I got a lump in my throat about the Lab dog no longer jumping on the couch. 


In the beautiful Pacific Northwest!

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Angele replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 12:42 PM | Locked

Thank you everyone for the nice compliments on my Dino quilt.  It was very fun to make. I got the Dino panel on sale and once I had a baby for it, found fabrics to match...and voila!

Thea I sometimes press the seams to one side and other times I press them open. This all depends on how many seams are intersecting. I try to avoid adding bulk in those seams as it gets very thick when you add the front and the batting. With all the quilting on top, there is no chance of the seams letting go.

Angèle  from NWO

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Marlabartlett60 replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 1:01 PM | Locked

Quiltless,  LMAO,  you should be a writer!  I love it!   I will read it over and over again.  Thank you , you made my stressful day , happy again, I'm still smiling typing this...  You da bomb!

MODESTO, CA.
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Pat Lancaster replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 4:11 PM | Locked

Quitless, I am still laughing over your essay! How funny. I sometimes wonder if there is anyone who will care about these quilts when I am gone. Now I know, they will just be an ancient artifact in someone's history class. Thanks for cheering up my day, roflol!

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Angele replied on Mon, Apr 7 2014 4:50 PM | Locked

Quiltless, your UFO story made me smile....lots. Just what I needed today.

Angèle  from NWO

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