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Another Sewing Machine??

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Donna B replied on Mon, May 6 2013 9:17 PM

weezee56:

Donna B:
 I am even concerned about that crazy looking foot pedal with the two things sticking up from it...LOL!

I really like my featherweights foot pedal. I'm sure you will like yours once you get use to it.

Weezee, good to know.  That really is a relief...I was getting worried...lol!  I hadn't read of anyone having a problem with them, but they really did look strange to me...

 

 Winthrop, WA

 

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Donna B, Have you got a name picked out for your new old FW. Marie said she named her FW Kitten I got mine in January, but was in Florida when it was delivered and didn't get back home until the middle of March.I took her to get a good cleaning and had them look her over to make sure all was good to go. She was made in 1953 and her serial number starts with AL, so I want to name mine either Lizzy after my Grandmother or Lucy after a nick name a boss of my gave me.

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Donna B replied on Tue, May 7 2013 11:06 AM

weezee56:
Donna B, Have you got a name picked out for your new old FW.

Actually I have been giving this some thought.  Believe it or not, I am thinking of naming it in honor of my DMIL...Garnet...for her love of fabric and sewing.

I had learned to sew many years before DH and I started dating and then married, but DMIL taught me a great deal about sewing that I had never learned before.  She didn't make pieced quilts, but did garments by the hundreds every year for 14 grand’s, her DD and 2 DIL's.  She learned on a Singer treadle machine (went to another family member), but had a New Home for daily use by the time I knew her well.  But she still used that old treadle machine on occasion!  For many years she managed a yardage store at Newberry's at the Portland, OR Lloyd Center (one of the first shopping centers in the NW).  I remember her coming home from working all day and sewing until after midnight - night after night.  It definitely was her relaxation of choice!  I helped her make many “quilts” in the 60’s and 70’s from sheets (F & B)…tying them with yarn and then self-binding.  My sons all have their “quilts” made by Grandma that they treasure. 

There are others who have influenced my love of fabric and sewing over the years and I have thought about them too, but Garnet wins out, hands down…so this machine will be named “Garnet”.  (I honestly do think of her almost every time I sit down at a sewing machine.  She passed about 12 years ago at 92 yo and I still miss her!)

 Winthrop, WA

 

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Donna B replied on Tue, May 7 2013 11:09 AM

This is not a FW, but thought you all might enjoy this picture from our Saturday Farmer's Market.  Grandma made the hats, but grand-daughter is using the 1936 Singer 99K hand-crank machine to make her fleece blanket while she keeps GM company.

 Winthrop, WA

 

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MNnancy replied on Tue, May 7 2013 12:21 PM

Wow, I did not know they made hand-crank machines.  I suppose it's the same concept as the treadle.  Great picture!


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Ginny replied on Tue, May 7 2013 3:53 PM

Yes Nancy, You can buy new ones in Ohio at one of the Amish hardware stores.  I saw them in Kidron, Ohio  although the last time was about 10 years ago.    Ginny

 

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Donna B, I love your choice, "Garnet" sounds wonderful. I think I will call mine Lucy. My Mothers middle name was Lucille. So it will be for my Mother too. When I was very young my Mother would sew for people. She used to make men's suits and women's clothing. She always made all my outer clothes, except winter coats, I was a teenager before I really got any store bought clothes. Mom was the one that got me into sewing, crochet and quilting. She passed away in Sept. 2000. I miss her everyday.

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Joni replied on Wed, May 8 2013 8:51 AM

Donna B

Such sassy hats and truly a lovely granddaughter.

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Joni replied on Wed, May 8 2013 9:13 AM

Thanks Donna I've bookmarked it for future reference, may just go ahead and get one so I'm prepared when the need comes.  I have a great place I go to have all my machines serviced (except my BabyLock) but it never hurts to be ahead of the game.

I love my Featherweight...so does my great neice.  Guess I need to make sure the girls get all my machines.  Have to redo my will and POA very soon, at my age can't be too cocky, could go anytime, or the good Lord willing live to be 100. 

So long as Jesus is my Savior, Master I'm not afraid!  Just pray he wants this once wild child!

 

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Agnes replied on Wed, May 8 2013 10:09 AM

I saw hand cranks for the first time when we dealt with natives from a reserve that had very limited electric sources. The giant generator would only run a few hours every day. The women wore only home sewn dresses made of plaid poly cottons. Modern day concession was to wear jeans underneath like leggings. One Christmas one of my staff members and I each received a dress from one of the families. We never modeled these! LOL

Then imagine my surprise that the Singer industrial 20U can be bought as hand crank to this day, special order I am sure. We're talking about the giant compared to the FW. I wouldn't want to be hand cranking that puppy.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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MNnancy replied on Wed, May 8 2013 10:21 AM

Thinking more about this...  with a treadle, you rock with your feet while both hands can be guiding the fabric.  With a crank, do you have to continually turn the handle leaving only one hand available to guide fabric, or do you crank for a while to build a charge and then you can sew two-handed for a few moments?


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Marie replied on Wed, May 8 2013 1:38 PM

Beautiful hats Donna and an especially beautiful granddaughter!  Is that a jean skirt I see where you have your blue hats hanging from?  Very clever hangers!

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Donna B replied on Wed, May 8 2013 2:00 PM

Marie:

Beautiful hats Donna and an especially beautiful granddaughter!  Is that a jean skirt I see where you have your blue hats hanging from?  Very clever hangers!

Oh gosh, didn't mean to imply it was my booth and goods, grand-daughter, and/or Singer!!!  It was none of the above!  It was just a picture from our local blog of last Saturday at our Farmer's Market.  

As we are all interested in unusual sewing machines and young budding quilters, I just thought you might enjoy the picture!   (I think what you thought was a jeans skirt is actually an apron...but since I was not there, I couldn't say for certain.)

 

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Donna B replied on Wed, May 8 2013 2:06 PM

MNnancy:

Thinking more about this...  with a treadle, you rock with your feet while both hands can be guiding the fabric.  With a crank, do you have to continually turn the handle leaving only one hand available to guide fabric, or do you crank for a while to build a charge and then you can sew two-handed for a few moments?

Nancy, I have never seen one actually used but I think you have to be turning the wheel with the handle for each revolution - up and down movement of the needle.  I know that is why it was considered a "safe" machine for young girls to learn on...they couldn't go too fast with them.  

DH just googled "Singer video hand crank" and came up with a bunch of them!  So, the answer is you definitely only have one hand available to guide the fabric!  The one he showed me was whizzing right along, so doesn't look all that safe for young kids to me...lol!

 

 Winthrop, WA

 

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MNnancy replied on Thu, May 9 2013 11:04 AM

Donna B:
The one he showed me was whizzing right along, so doesn't look all that safe for young kids to me...lol!

Or safe for me either!  I'm not coordinated enough to sew with one hand!  LOL


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