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quilting software?

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dora@dorasspinningwheel.com posted on Sat, Feb 9 2013 5:47 PM

Needing information regarding quilting software.  Looking at Quilt-Pro Systems 1-2-3 Quilt for designing blocks and quilts on the computer using your own fabric by scanning it in.

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Dora.  Not familiar with that software.  I have EQ7 and absolutely love it


In the beautiful Pacific Northwest!

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I have EQ7 but haven't had enough play time on it yet.

Quilting My Rainbow

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Ditto what Judy said :)

 

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I have Quilt-Pro v.6 and have used it for a few years. I recently purchased EQ7 but I haven't used it much yet. I prefer the Quilt-Pro, though. I find the block design and quilt design parts of the program are a little easier to use than EQ7. I don't know if that's because it's an easier program to use or if it's because I'm used to it. The Quilt Pro software is less expensive but EQ7 may have more features. One thing about EQ7, though, is that many of the quilt shows offer classes for it and there's also an EQ7 group on the QCA site where you can get immediate help from someone.

 

 

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Suggested by tnmtgrl

I'm curious? What is the quilting software do? Is it for designing the piecing of the quilt or the quilting pattern on the finished top? I am still new to quilting and learning all the quilting terminology. 

Michelle B
Enjoy family, friends and hobbies

 

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Kris replied on Sat, Feb 9 2013 8:44 PM

Dora,

I have EQ on a PC and Quilt Pro version 5 on my Mac.

I had a chance to see Quilt Pro for Windows and I have to say it is way better than the Mac version.

The Mac version is not updated often and hardly any of the available add-ons are compatible with it.

EQ is far more ubiquitous and quite versatile. Support is top notch too.

I think between the two it's a matter of which you get used to first. However, if you have a Mac, I cannot recommend Quilt Pro. Otherwise you should try them both if you have the opportunity.

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Kris replied on Sat, Feb 9 2013 8:52 PM

Michelle,

the software mentioned is for designing quilts. Both have thousands of blocks or you can create your own. You can scan in or download fabric swatches so you can see what they look like in your design.

You can get fairly complex or go simple.

Both allow you to print rotary cutting dimensions, foundations for paper piecing or templates. You have to figure out how the pieces fit together after cutting.

Click on my name and view my blog. I have a couple quilts with EQ design and actual quilt.

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Kris replied on Sat, Feb 9 2013 9:30 PM

Dora,

Quilt Pro lets you download a free 30 day trial (for windows of course).

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Debbie replied on Sat, Feb 9 2013 10:15 PM

Didn't ya'll mention another one, less expensive?  can't remember the name.

"I'm just a poor soul who's intentions are good.   Oh, Lord, Please don't let me be misunderstood."

Debbie (dear1953)  

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Kris replied on Sun, Feb 10 2013 7:42 AM

Debbie,

EQ makes a program called "Quilt Design Wizard". It's a simplified version of their signature software that goes for around $25. It's a god place to start if you're unsure whether or not you'll like designing on a computer.

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Kris:
EQ makes a program called "Quilt Design Wizard".

 

I did buy Quilt Design Wizard. I don't know what I was thinking as I already had EQ7.  I'm such a doofus at times. I'm going to give it to my granddaughter as she's getting into quilting. In fact, this morning she's coming over for quilt lessons. She's making a baby quilt for a friend's baby shower.The other day, after spending an hour looking through books, nothing was exactly what she wanted. I finally fired up EQ7 and we had a quilt designed within 15 minutes. I'll post a photo when it's done.  


In the beautiful Pacific Northwest!

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Quilt Design Wizard is wonderfully simple to use and learn. Please be aware that you can not design your own blocks, or scan in your own fabric. You have to use what is already there. Luckily there are free monthly downloads so lots of new blocks and fabric are added all the time.

New users should be warned that EQ has a substantial learning curve. I love my EQ, but expect at least 60-80 hours to get up and running. And if you don't use it at least once a quarter you will probably forget where are all the commands are.

Denise Smart

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Denise Smart:
New users should be warned that EQ has a substantial learning curve.

 

That is so true Denise.  Although using the basic features of EQ7 is fairly straight forward, learning the more advanced features IS time consuming.  Classes are essential for me as I'm just too impatient to wade through a lengthy manual and I need to be able to ask questions. Since I've been taking the online classes at Quilt University, my skills are growing and also my enjoyment of using the program.

But, you're right. If you don't continue to use it, you forget how to use those more complex features. I need to repeat a procedure over and over again before it sinks in. I wouldn't recommend the program for people who don't enjoy playing on the computer.


In the beautiful Pacific Northwest!

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Kris replied on Sun, Feb 10 2013 11:58 AM

Denise Smart:
New users should be warned that EQ has a substantial learning curve. I love my EQ, but expect at least 60-80 hours to get up and running. And if you don't use it at least once a quarter you will probably forget where are all the commands are.

Denise,

I disagree.

Granted, EQ can get very complicated and involved, but a new user should be able to grasp the basics very quickly. The manual has step-by-step instructions and the software has video lessons. The EQ website has a plethora of lessons, tips and tricks plus they have a YouTube channel. If you hover your cursor over the icons a pop up tells you what they do.

My first version was EQ 6 and I was up and running the first day. My Day played with it one day and was able to come up with his own design without my help. He has since made the quilt under my tutelage (and coaxing).

I'm sure there are things I haven't discovered yet but this software can be as simple or as complicated as the user wants it to be. 

To the new user I say play with an open mind don't be afraid of it.

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