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Jodie Davis Posted: Thu, Apr 30 2009 5:24 PM

Post your tips & techniques here and I might just turn yours inot a video!

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Was watching a Fons and Porter show I had recorded yesterday and it was on hand applique and the variety of threads needed for applique projects.  I do quite a bit of hand applique and I use 4 different shades of grey - very light to very dark and have had to get  a perfectly matching thread very few times.  I don't know why it works but it does and after doing a "test run" on my applique projects with the greys it makes projects much more portable.

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Peggy replied on Tue, Jul 14 2009 11:28 AM

I was asked by a friend to do a picture quilt for her 2 children.  I am attaching her (rough) layout of where the pictures should be put.  She wants me to piece it together and quilt it.

Any suggestions how to make this look (WOW!!).

She wants them back by Christmas.  is this possible?

from Minnesota

 

 

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Stephanie replied on Wed, Jul 22 2009 11:28 PM

Peggy, I think you're off to a great start, and by the looks of this already I  think you already have a wow factor. 

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Stephanie replied on Wed, Jul 22 2009 11:45 PM

Jodie I have been trying to make skinny stems for flowers to applique without having to sew a tube and turn it. I had some success with cutting a strip and folding it right sides out,  taking the smallest seam possible along the edge, or trim it off as close to the stitching as possible. I ran a wooden bbq skewer up into it so that i could be able to pull the tube off with the seam to the back and press. I found I could actually flatten the seam out better than trying to turn a tube resulting in a lot less hassle from trying to turn the tube inside out and less bulk by being able to work the seam to one side. See what you think.  

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gini replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 2:17 AM

stephanie, if i am reading you right  that is sorta how i do skinny stems.   i don't double the fabric.. i cut the fabric on the bias, this is very important, because you need to trim very close.  lay the stem piece rightside down and placed where you wnat the stem to go.  do a running stitch along one edge, trim as close as you can and fold the fabric back over itself  with right side now up. and do a blind stitch on the final seam.   you can make extremely skinny stems this way, and they won't fray if they are cut on the bias.   you can start out with a piece that is less than a 1/4 inch wide and trim down from there.   hope i was clear enough.    gini

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Stephanie replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 10:11 AM

Awesome Gini, The method I was using leaves both edges turned under like a turned applique but if I cut it on the bias it won't fray so there is probably no need to worry about both edges being turned under. I have heard that cutting them on the bias allows you to curve them better as well.

Thanks for the tip. Do you use steam a seam 2 to iron them down before you sew? 

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gini replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 10:40 AM

stephanie,  no  steam a seam , i just lay them down as i go.  i lightly sketch roughly where i want the stem to go, then adjust it with my needle as i sew.  i don't pin or any thing.   and you're right, you only turn under the last seam  to sew, the first seam is a running stitch that goes really quickly, trim the seam allowance and fold over the stem fabric to hide the running stitch.   if  i  am making the stem just a little wider, i won't trim the seam allowance much, it gives the stem more body.    gini

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Stephanie replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 11:11 AM

Thanks Gini, This sounds a lot easier, and with that first seam grounding the stem to the fabric it wold be so much easier to turn under the finished side. Great advice.

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Stephanie replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 5:52 PM

Gini, Don't you just know that after I posted my tip I went to the mailbox and there was a new issue of McCall's Quilting and as I was looking through it there on page 66 was exactly what I had been talking about. go figure! I still think I like your way better,especially after seeing your lionfish. That kind of movement is what I've been searching for.

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gini replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 6:15 PM

stephanie,  the lionfish wasn't done that way.  it was a very precise pattern, and i very precisely pieced it using a technique i learned from mary sorenson.   (maryappliques.com   go look at her patterns, they are wonderful.  i have had the honor of taking two classes from her  and would take more if i find where she's teaching.  if any of you get a chance to take a class from her it is well worth it. you start at the very best applique can be. when you learn her method you can do anything)    it is a time consuming method, but extremely accurate for applique.   if it were a pattern that i had made, it wouldn't need to be so precise.   however, most of the time when i am making stems and plopping flowers at the ends of them, i don't have to be so exact, and applique them the way i described.   i use many technique in my applique. i try to use the easiest or quickest method for the piece i am working on.   i don't make too many appliqued pieces that are sooooo  time consuming. only about 1 a year.  most of my stuff i bang out as fast as i can.   the lion fish is one of nine fishies, i have five of them finished.   they're all cut out and waiting to be sewn.  it'll be a couple of weeks before i can get back to them.   it is one of the quilts i can't wait to finish.  gini

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Stephanie replied on Thu, Jul 23 2009 6:53 PM

Oops, sorry for the assumption, I'll be sure to check out the website. Thanks. can't wait to see the finish. 

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Kris replied on Sat, Jul 25 2009 6:01 PM

Jodie,

I have a tip for making binding: Put a pin on the ironing board and feed a folded end under it. Place your iron on one side and pull the fabric through. The pin helps keep the fold and the binding is creased as it passes under the iron. If you're making very long binding lift your iron occasionally to avoid burning your ironing surface. I took a photo to help illustrate what I mean:

I hope this helps. I just pull from the left and my binding is nicely folded and pressed without burning my fingers.

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Thea replied on Sat, Jul 25 2009 6:07 PM

Kris, great technique - I have done that on occasion but my cheapie iron sends steam out the sides now so I have to be careful that I don't burn my fingers - someday I'll own a great iron again that my children(cats) don't knock on the floor - for now it is the cheapie that I have had for about 5 years and it has been knocked on the floor countless times... My rowenta that I bought before this one was knocked over just once and it bit the dust... so for now it is the cheapie... lol

But this method you are showing works great!

 

 

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gini replied on Sun, Jul 26 2009 7:23 PM

kris, thanks for demoing this technique, i have the little gadgets that you feed the fabric through.   this will work great for the sizes the gadgets don't come in, and for using when the gadgets are on holiday somewhere.  gini

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