Top 10 Posters

Using backing to self bind quilts?

Page 1 of 2 (16 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS

rated by 0 users
This post has 15 Replies | 5 Followers

Top 100 Contributor
Female
Posts 653
Points 16,575
Brigit-Carol Posted: Mon, Jan 28 2013 8:50 AM

Why is it not considered acceptable to fold the backing over to the front to self-bind a quilt?  It is so much easier for me to do that, but I understand it is not considered "correct".  I read that some quilt shows won't even display a quilt bound in that fashion.  I want to learn to quilt the correct way, but when it takes longer to bind a quilt than it does to piece it or FMQ it, I get discouraged.  I love piecing and FMQing, I don't even mind sandwiching too much, but really hate to bind so keep putting it off.  I have 4 quilts all done ready for binding and I'm dreading it.  I could whip them out in less than an hour each if I could just fold the backing over.  It will take 2 - 3 hours to machine bind with a separate piece, which seems like a waste of time to me.  These are prayer quilts I want to try to sell on the community website for a minimal price to help cover the cost of fabric.  Do you think they will sell if they are bound with the backing? 

Brigit-Carol

  • | Post Points: 80
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 27,705
Points 436,480
Nana replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 10:02 AM

Brigit

I don't know the answer to that one.  I haven't had very good luck getting a nice smooth binding by folding the backing over for binding.   And I can't get nice mitered corners that way either.

Vinton, Virginia

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 150 Contributor
Female
Posts 651
Points 12,305
Michelle replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 10:06 AM

Brigit, 

 I usually bind my quilts that way, course I am leery of the "binding police coming to my house"!! I also found I can bind faster and use the backing which to me is already a large cost of the quilts.  I make sure my backing will be at least 4 inches larger than the quilt, then turn that forward, I miter the corners also on that side and have not had a problem.  I also make sure the batting is in the binding, so it creates a "blanket binding" look to my quilts.  Sometimes I bind the traditional way, but then I have to budget for more material that contrasts with both the back and the front. 

  So you are not alone out there!! Maybe we can be the new "binding police"!! I don't think our grandmothers would mind either way. 

Michelle B
Enjoy family, friends and hobbies

 

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 75 Contributor
Female
Posts 1,397
Points 23,280
Debbie replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 10:32 AM

These are prayer quilts I want to try to sell on the community website for a minimal price to help cover the cost of fabric. Do you think they will sell if they are bound with the backing?

Brigit-Carol - I think here it would depend on your buyers, if they are quilters or quilt educated and know the difference, they may not buy.  But to the uneducated person, you would probably get a sell.

I've done binding using the backing as well and the only problem I had was that the binding does not lay as well as regular binding does since it is not cut on the bias, like binding .  I agree with you, it is much faster this way but is your overall quality of the finished product as good as doing it the binding way?  That's the choice you have to make.

"I'm just a poor soul who's intentions are good.   Oh, Lord, Please don't let me be misunderstood."

Debbie (dear1953)  

  • | Post Points: 35
Top 100 Contributor
Posts 797
Points 15,925
Sue replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 10:54 AM

Hi ladies, I have used the backing fabric to bind some of my quilts, however, I do cut it and then make the binding, stitching it first to the front then turning it to the back ans stitching it down by hand.  For me, the binding process is very relaxing.  You could stitch it all my machine using the stitch in the ditch method, but I would make binding strips first.  Whatever you decide to do is correct for you.

 

In The Piney Woods of Deep East Texas

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 9,059
Points 170,797
MNnancy replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 11:21 AM

Debbie:
was that the binding does not lay as well as regular binding does since it is not cut on the bias

I rarely cut a bias binding, and I don't have any trouble with binding laying well.  I do fold my binding strips in half for double strength.  Is there enough extra backing that you can fold it doubled before stitching it down for that extra strength?  

The ladies at church do their world relief quilts using the backing as binding.  I have only tried backing as binding on pot holders and it was tricky to get the corners to miter nicely.

 


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 50 Contributor
Female
Posts 2,770
Points 65,998
Jeanine replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 11:40 AM

I just did four flannel baby quilts for Project Linus using the backing to bind the quilt.  I like to use this method when I works (the backing fabric looks ok on the front and I have enough of it.)  It helps with expenses and time with the volume of quilts I do.  I probably would not do this on quilts I make for myself or give or sell to others.  I don't think it would make a difference for the type of quilts you are talking about.  Most people would not notice the difference.  I would say it is 100% up to you what you want to do.

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 9,059
Points 170,797
MNnancy replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 11:59 AM

Jeanine:
It helps with expenses and time with the volume of quilts I do. 

I think I'll mention this to the guild's charity quilt group.  As this year's coordinator, I get the tops once they have been pieced and quilted, and the pile is backing up as they wait for binding.  I think I'll ask them to leave the excess backing on to see if we can't speed things up by using that method.


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 13,251
Points 172,988
Marie replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 12:24 PM

Brigit, my first quilt I brought the backing around to the front but it is not as lasting as the traditional way of binding.  There is only one layer of fabric on the edges as apposed to the two that you get with the traditional and it tends to wear quickly.

Millbury, MA

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 24,403
Points 361,167
Kris replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 2:17 PM

Brigit-Carol:
I love piecing and FMQing, I don't even mind sandwiching too much, but really hate to bind so keep putting it off.

I hate binding too and I have several quilted-waiting-for-binding quilts.

I say do what works for you. I've never been told not to do binding that way but I imagine it's not as durable.

  • | Post Points: 5
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 9,059
Points 170,797
MNnancy replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 4:33 PM

Marie:
There is only one layer of fabric on the edges as apposed to the two that you get with the traditional and it tends to wear quickly.

That's why I suggested that if there was enough excess backing, she could fold/double that as she brings it to the front, and it would be more like a traditional binding.  Think that would work?


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 25 Contributor
Female
Posts 3,327
Points 46,255
Angele replied on Mon, Jan 28 2013 5:17 PM

Brigid, my mom used to bind her quilts that way as it saved on fabric. I have to agree that the first thing to go on those quilts was usually the binding.  Mind you we used them every day for years too.  So I guess the final decision is yours. Too bad you don't live close as I enjoy sewing the binding on. I find it relaxing.  

Angèle  from NWO

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 100 Contributor
Female
Posts 653
Points 16,575

Thank you for your replies.  The quilt shop only uses one layer of binding on the quilts they finish, so I guess I don't see the difference in wear.  Let me show you what I'm talking about in the following pic of a couple of mug rugs I just finished. The one in front uses the backing as binding, whereas the one in back is traditional machine binding (doubled, sewn on the back and then on the front.  To me, the front one is much nicer looking. 

When I fold over the backing, I fold it once under the batting layer, then again to the front of the quilt.  I can't guarantee that there is a double layer all around, but the chances are there is. 

Brigit-Carol

  • | Post Points: 35
Not Ranked
Female
Posts 11
Points 70
Arlette replied on Thu, Feb 7 2013 6:50 PM

This is a great idea.  I'm going to try this on my charity blankets. 

  • | Post Points: 20
Top 10 Contributor
Female
Posts 11,649
Points 135,957

Bridget-Carol,  I do it this way all the time, I leave 4 inches all the way around, that way i can double fold to make a thicker binding

[Ava, Missouri

  • | Post Points: 5
Page 1 of 2 (16 items) 1 2 Next > | RSS
Have a Question? | About Us | Privacy Policy | Join Today © 2014 F+W All rights reserved.
By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use