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Best way to baste?

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Janet posted on Fri, Jan 4 2013 12:04 AM

I'm wondering what is the preferred way to baste a quilt. I tried pinning for the first time and it's going very well. I hand quilt and I usually baste with thread but have always hated the time that takes. Are there pitfalls to using pins and how close should they be set?

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Janet ,I like to use the basting Spray, It easy and works well .I still do some pinning with the spray ,but not as much.Usually around the edges . Barbara

Liberty,Missouri

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Janet, I pin baste too and like the results.  I keep my pins about a fist apart.

As Barbara stated, I also like to use the basting sprays with pins around the edges.  I use spray when I have the opportunity to be in a well ventilated area.  This time of year, I am more likely to pin only.  Too chilly here in WNY to have windows open.  LOL

Darlene

from Western New York

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Thea replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 6:01 AM

Janet - When I was first taught to quilt, many many years ago, I was taught 2 methods - the thread basting and the pins.  I learned that with pins you put your fist down on the quilt and put a pin on either side - the distance between your pins was just the fist all over the quilt.  It for me took lots and lots of pins as I have small hands - not tiny like my DDIL but small.  It was very difficult for me too with my arthritis - my hands hurt and hurt... So I started using the basting spray and i use Sullivans - I have tried others but like it the best... 

When you use the pins - it is easy - especially for hand quilting because if you need to sew in that area - you just remove the pin and move on - you don't have to put it back either.  I don't know of any pitfalls.

 

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Star replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 7:38 AM

Hi, Just wanted to chime in here with my two cents. I was also taught to pin baste or thread baste. I use pins. I was introdued to the spray basting about four years ago and used it a few times. It works ok, and I know people who swear by it. I tossed my three cans in the garbage when the question of the chemicals contained in the spray came up. I prefer not to use those chemicals in a quilt that will be given to a baby or child anymore. They may be safe, but that is just how I feel. I had this epiphany when sandwhiching a baby quilt. It occurred to me as I was coughing and coughing while spraying that these chemicals may not be good for the baby, even in a washed quilt. I actually took the sandwhich apart wasted the batting, washed the top and backing and re-sandwhiched using pins. The fabric was still quite sticky even after going through the washer.

The spray is probably just fine and safe, but my preference is not to use it anymore. I send most of my full size quilts to be long arm quilted anyway and it does not take that long to pin baste the smaller quilts. Just saying........

I'm glad you asked this question because I had been wondering if there were any new basting techniques available, besides spray, pin, and thread.  

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gini replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:08 AM

the easiest way is to let a longarmer do it.   i have been wall basting with pinmoors on smaller quilts.  they are quick and easy, way easier on my hands than thread or safety pin basting, and expensive.  kris doesn't like them, though

gini in north idaho

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Hi Janet, it is nice to meet you. I do mine on a frame with a mid-arm but the ones I did on my regular machine, I pinned and also did them about a fist apart. I used the curved pins with the colorful plastic tops which made them way easier to handle.

Life is like a quilt...bits & pieces, joy & sorrow, stitched with love

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Nana replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:46 AM

Janet

I pin baste and have never had a problem.  I have tried the spray and just didn't like the results.  Maybe it is because I make really big quilts and I find that I get wrinkles when I use the spray.

Vinton, Virginia

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Pinmoors are great on your hands and easy to use, but my dog is too interested in them and I don't want the vet bills...

stitcheraz

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gini replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:01 PM

stitcheraz:
Pinmoors are great on your hands and easy to use, but my dog is too interested in them

 i only have a husband and so far he hasn't used any,  but he has mentioned they look a lot like strike indicators.  i asked, you mean bobber, and i got the look.  i guess fly fisherfolk don't use bobbers

gini in north idaho

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Janet replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:24 PM

Thanks a bunch for the help, everyone! I think I'll continue using pins most of the time, but I'll space them a fist apart. I may try the basting spray sometime.

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gini replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:26 PM

i like the basting spray for smaller quilts and wall hangings.  anything bigger and i tend to get wrinkles. you need to be careful of which spray baste you get,m there's one out there that is awful, it comes in a black can. 

gini in north idaho

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Janet, I have pin basted quilts to be hand quilted.  The only problem I had was the pins getting caught in the hoop (I'm assuming you are quilting in a hoop).  I would sometimes have to remove some so the hoop would fit properly and then the fabric wasn't stable enough.  I finally went back to thread basting.  However, I read somewhere that after pin basting take the quilt to your machine and baste with water soluble thread, remove the pins  and quilt.  I know this sounds like a lot of extra work, but with the time of thread basting, especially if it's a large quilt, this might be quicker.  I intend to try this on my next quilt.

Jane

 

 

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