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Agnes replied on Wed, Dec 26 2012 9:35 AM

Michelle:

Agnes, I am I interested in how you do the cardboard with flannel attached? That sounds like a great tip but I can't visualize how you are using them? Do you have a photo? Thanks. Michelle 

I don't have a photo at the moment but I will do something up later in the day to demonstrate and take photos.

 

Agnes in NW Ontario

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Patti replied on Wed, Dec 26 2012 11:13 AM

When I start sewing, I often lightly grasp the threads, and I usually don't have the problem of bunched threads.

Patti

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Judy replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 10:04 AM

Agnes:

I don't have a photo at the moment but I will do something up later in the day to demonstrate and take photos.

 

Agnes, I was going to ask for a photo too.  I would really like to see this. It sounds like it is a really good tip.

Judy

Judy Kay - Stow Ohio

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Kristen,

we always called them starter pieces but the thread that buches up under your fabric or tangles around your Bobbin is called a thread bunny (from my experience). I do 3 things to prevent thread bunnies and the machine eating my fabric. 1) if you are just doing straight stitching, always use a single hole plate 2) lightly starch your fabric on the wrong side to give it a little more stability so oit cant be easily pulled through the plate 3) start your stitching like you would if quilting. Put your needle down and then back up, bringing you bobbin thread to the top. Hold on to both threads and take a few stitches. Then you can clip your threads and they never show. Hope this helps!

 

aka Grandma Sunshine

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Agnes replied on Fri, Jan 4 2013 1:46 PM

Finally I am ready to expound on my design boards. Not nearly all my boards are the same either in materials or size. I used items at hand to make them. Sizes are different depending on my bins.

A little bit about making the boards. I have boards made from Arttex boards, corrugated cardboard and very super stiff dividers from filing cabinets. For the fussy stuff I have used flannel backed tablecloths, flannel, batting pieces and felt.. The skinniest boards are from the dividers with tablecloth pieces and held together with masking tape edges. For the heavier boards and materials I stuck them together with spray on adhesive.

This is the closet where the bins live. Through the Windows bin you will see a white line. That is a board ready to bring out for sewing.

Bin open, boards laid out with all the components for one block each. The little baggies in the bin each hold all the floral fabric for one block each. I cut these in April/May but didn't start piecing until Dec. Should I get tired of this project or life gets in the way I can just pick up work in progress and stick it in the bin. Whenever I get back to it  I don't have to wonder what my intentions were. I always have any of my note in this bin. If this were someone else's design I would have that info in the bin. The fabric bumps on the lid of the chickadee lid are the yardage for that project.

Boards at sewing machine.

One board at pressing station.

These pieces are ready to return to the board for the next piecing step.

In this particular quilt I am using 10 boards. As the quilt has 20 blocks I finish the blocks for the first half before I even pull out the second half. Currently the first half is on a similar larger design board on the door to my sewing/bedroom.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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Judy replied on Sat, Jan 5 2013 9:15 AM

Agnes:
Finally I am ready to expound on my design boards. Not nearly all my boards are the same either in materials or size. I used items at hand to make them. Sizes are different depending on my bins.

Agnes, thank you so much for sharing this idea. It reminds me of a lesson I learned a long time ago that applies to almost everything. It is to take more time now to do something, spend an extra 5 minutes now, to save 5 minutes many times in the future. It looks like most of your bins are the same size. I have a lot of projects that I want to start, but know that I won't have time to finish right now. This inspires me.

thanks

Judy

Judy Kay - Stow Ohio

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Agnes replied on Sat, Jan 5 2013 9:50 AM

Judy:
It looks like most of your bins are the same size.

In that photo there is only one of the smaller bins. I have quite a stack more of those. The smaller ones are fine, when an idea is born, for the pattern and perhaps some fabric on hand but when it gets to work time the ones you see are my best option. I also have the larger ones in varying heights that two medium bins can sit flat in side by side. The lower ones fit under my bed and are used for quilt storage. I like WIP on the shelves in this closet so it doesn't become "out of sight, out of mind." I'm in and out of this area daily so I can't forget and the clear plastic plus the label keep it in my face. I used to have a vast assortment of different bins. When hubby set up a wood working workshop I was generous and gave him all bins that were not part of this line. Many were solid colored and worked well for him because he seemed to thrive with the haystack filing system for office work. This always meant he spent far more time looking for things than actually working on them. Keeping bins the same makes for easier storage and stacking if the shelves are really just caverns. In my ideal world the area you see would hold a bank of movable shelving. My second wall of shelving is just that, has six shelves, and I am requesting my son to bring me another two shelves.

Also in order to keep my projects to overrun me I give my new ideas "simmer" time. This is where the smaller bins are really handy. I din't cut right away, just put the pattern and fabric into the bin. I just moved the fabric from two simmer bins back into stash. These ideas appealed last spring when my life circumstances were entirely different. I started and was over half done piecing a throw from that same period that I have now packaged up to send to another quilter. I am finally embracing my Batik period that started as a 2000 goal. It originally started as a goal of keeping my WIP to a reasonable number and not cut fabric the minute an idea or pattern caught my eye. I also had hundreds, if not thousands of triangles to sew up. Along the way I added the catch that I had to use up all my fabric as best as possible first. It has had a few detours and a vast amount of fabric coming my way from other sources but in very late 2012 I finally was there. In case you're wondering, I am not working with batiks exclusively but new fabric purchases tend to be batiks.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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