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Stella Table Topper

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Renee posted on Fri, Nov 30 2012 5:11 AM

Hello,

I wanted to know if anyone has this pattern?  

If so, would you be willing to share it with me.

Thanks 

 

 

 

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I don't have the pattern, but you can get it here: Stella Table Topper  and they even have an electronic download.

Life is like a quilt...bits & pieces, joy & sorrow, stitched with love

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Annie replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 8:19 AM

Renee,

I don't have it but it may not be too difficult to recreate.  I think I'll try that on EQ.  If I get anywhere with it I will certainly share it with you, but it may be a while.

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Agnes replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 10:07 AM

Annie:
I don't have it but it may not be too difficult to recreate.

All the pieced part is a very traditional Star, can't think of the name of it, with the three HST block having the background HST cut as a square. I think perhaps the bonus with the purchased pattern is that it is supposed to have a different binding method. The formula for any square set on point is multiply the size of the square times 1.4 to give you a rough estimate of the final size, eg 12 x 1.4=16.8 or 18 x 1.4= 25.2. In the 12" your 9 patch pieces finish at 4". the 18" they are 6". This design has been on my radar for a long time though this is the first time I have seen it marketed by someone.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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Thea replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 11:54 AM

I know I am standing on my band wagon here - but remember that the person who designed this pattern is selling it and it is her livelihood.  If you reproduce it in EQ for yourself that is one thing but we need to not give away someone else's work.  It is difficult I know and we want to help out our neighbor and share with them to assist them but most patterns aren't that expensive.  

 

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Thank you, Thea!  I wasn't sure if I should voice my opinion on this. Something else we have to be careful of is copyright laws.  But, to me, what's most important is supporting our sister/brother quilt designers by purchasing their products.

 

 

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Agnes replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 12:18 PM

Thea--The block used in this table topper is an old traditional block. I hate to go to my stand which is almost all patterns are just a variation of something that has been around 100 years or more. I didn't need  EQ7 to draw it. Two minutes with a graph sheet is all I needed. Therefore I have no problem sharing my designs. I'm still living in the dark ages when it comes to sketching my quilt blocks. What the seller of this pattern has that she can lay claim to is her written instructions, not the design of the block itself. That's how I see it and that's how industry works. Just watch Shark Tank where you can see multi-millionaires or billionaires come up with this all the time. They have lawyers on their payroll and often the first question when someone makes their pitch that they want to market something is what makes this different from the dozens that are on the market already.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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Agnes replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 12:26 PM

Am I wrong if I argue that the block is an old traditional block and this particular layout has been used long before this designer wrote her instructions? It is her instructions that are protected, not the block itself because the originator of the block probably died long before the designer was a gleam in her daddy's eye. If every other industry had as many "designers" and sellers of products or whatever as the small niche quilting industry has our entire shopping industry would be impossible to navigate.

Agnes in NW Ontario

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Renee replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 2:01 PM

Hi Annie,

 I appreciate the offer, that is so sweet of you to try and recreate it.  If you have other things to do please don't feel obligated to work on it.  I just saw the pattern and thought maybe someone on QCA already had it.

 

Thanks for the generousity

 

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Agnes, you are so right in the fact that the BLOCK has been around. Each time we see a new quilt pattern, if you've sewn for any length of time at all, you probably recognize it from another quilt. I personally do not buy patterns anymore except if I had never done that specific piecing, i.e. the bear claw I purchased this past spring. Then to make matters worse the pattern was $10, and it had the wrong fabric requirements and the cutting of the fabric units was wrong. The problem I see is that the pattern writer just didn't give a dam* enough to have the pattern over seen and therefore I had several pieces of purchased fabrics in the wrong length, then the cutting wasn't the right size to fit together. Oh yeah I did the pattern correctly because I caught a step; I am a math person, and saved my project. I wrote to the designer; and I use that word loosely, she said she would give me any other pattern of hers for FREE, really?? Like I am going to spend time figuring out if she did pattern instruction right, Nope Not Me A problem with copyrights is that anyone can say the design is theirs and put it to paper, I would imagine most patterns on the market today are done in a software problem, well then it should be copyrighting by that software program. YES?  We all are designers, we take fabric and an idea and we go with that. I've seen videos on several quilt programs and the blocks are there for you to use, we as a designer only adds the color ways, and layout.
 Agnes I too use graph paper to do my layouts, I have a wonderful box of colored pencils and work out the details. So I guess I could sell my design as a pattern?? Lol

Thea, I understand your concerns as well, I too make my own patterns I drew out the different layouts, wrote the instructions to three quilt tops I designed, because the instructions I found were out dated and just plain too many step; & I o achieve the same results. I don't produce these instructions; I give them away to those who purchase my kits. I want it to be the easiest process and that is why I sell more kits. I imagine this is a very controversial subject, and I am sorry to have ranted , but I am just putting my opinion.

 


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Thea replied on Sat, Dec 1 2012 5:42 PM

As quilters who have been around a long time, we do see patterns that have been in the data base for a long long time and are public domain.  And it is okay to draft your own quilt from designs that you see.  What isn't okay to do is to share a pattern written by someone else.  A few years back there was a huge discussion about this and I hate to see what happened then happen again.  So any new quilters out there - be very careful about sharing patterns - if you look at most patterns today they say on them for personal use only.  This means only the person buying the magazine or the pattern.  So all I am asking you to do is to be careful and remember that those folks that are kind enough to write up these patterns are doing it as a job.  They are putting food on their tables and roofs over their heads.  And yes sometimes those instructions are not written very well.  Those authors should give a sound Sorry and refund any monies that a person spent because fabric is expensive and this is not a cheap hobby.  

This also is a commercial site so we have to be careful here not to infringe for their sakes on any copyright infringements.  

 

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Nana replied on Wed, Dec 26 2012 2:47 PM

Agnes

I agree...if the block is a traditional block then the only thing new would be the written instructions.  Almost all the "new" patterns are just a variation of a traditional block that has been around for 100s of years.

Vinton, Virginia

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Joni replied on Fri, Dec 28 2012 10:07 AM

This nine patch with variations of the squares using HST's and others is basically an easy block to create yourself.  We have been given instructions on how to create HST, etc, now just to add your 1/4" for seams, etc. 

This nine patch is really cute and I love the HST edges, think I'll get out one of my quilting books, on how to make the blocks and make one for myself and for my neighbors, maybe even one for my SS 2013.

An awesome way to us use scraps and FQ's one has not found a use for.  Go for it ladies, you don't have to worry about infringement of copywrites or anything like it if you make your own patttern.  Having a picture to aid in drawing your blocks is a wonderful way to do it.

I have several books I've collected that show me how to figure measurements on most any blocks I chose to make, what makes your design unique is the fabric you use.  When I finish mine it will be correctly called the Joni Table topper...yep that sounds just right.

That said (written) I'm now encouraged to begin sewing again, it has been a dry spell the past few days.  I was feeling burnt out, but now with this beautiful challenge I'm ready to get busy.

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