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BEGINNER NEEDS HELP? QUILTING MY SANDWICH?

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polkij posted on Sat, Aug 11 2012 6:59 PM

I have my sandwish spray basted together and I am trying to quilt it myself but can't get my sewing machine to do correctly to let me do the stippling design....

so my silly question is can i just sew it with the same stitching i used when i made the quilt squares?

 

and just do a basic straight line all over it to quilt it together...?

 

 thank you

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Yes, you certainly can!  That would be easiest for a beginner I think. 

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Pamela replied on Sat, Aug 11 2012 7:10 PM

polkij:
but can't get my sewing machine to do correctly to let me do the stippling design....

Just a quick question - did you put the feed dogs down to do free-motion quilting? You will also have to adjust your tension. Try the process out on a quilt sandwich sample first. Free motion quilting takes getting used to. Although, some individuals pick it up quickly.

Otherwise, you certainly can quilt using a regular stitch. But, you will want to use a walking foot, unless your machine has a built-in even feed. Otherwise, the quilt will not feed through the machine smoothly for the quilting. If you choose to quilt this way, you will want to plan out how you will quilt the parts of the quilt. Stitch in the ditch works well around blocks, but open space between blocks, in sashing or in borders generally needs something more.

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Of course you can.  It is the easiest way to learn.  One suggestion, it is a lot easier to do if you have a walking foot.  If you do not you still can do it, but I would add some pins to help hold everything together

 Elizabeth

From Sunny Southern CA

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A couple of years ago I purchased a book called "One Line at a Time" that shows all kinds of ways to quilt with geometric shapes and lines using your walking foot.  Really like that book!


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Nancy I just did get this book myself , she has some really good stuff in it,that I'm gonna work on when I get a chance. I wish I'd seen it along time ago. barbara

Liberty,Missouri

EAT!! SLEEP !! QUILT!!

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My favorite thing for quilting is the machiners gloves, couldn't free motion without them.  Barbara, I just ordered that book ,too.

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Bonnie replied on Mon, Aug 13 2012 6:54 AM

Hi Polkij,

I used to do all my quilting on my sewing machine, including over-sized king quilts. For FMQ like stippling etc., you drop the feed dogs and use an open toe quilting foot or a embroidery free motion foot. Use a walking foot with the feed dogs up for doing anything with straight lines, Stitch in the ditch, etc. The walking foot keeps your fabric feeding evenly on both top and bottom. I never rolled the quilt, I just scrunched it in. This makes it easier to handle. I also used a sewers silicon spray on my surface that I was using this includes the sewing machine and the area around it. This allows the fabric to move more freely on your working surface and makes it much easier to move the quilt along. As others have mentioned quilters gloves help tremendously. Also start in the middle of your quilt and work your way to the outer edges. This hleps prevent getting bulges in your fabric. I hope this has helped you. You will do fine and have a lot of fun.

Bonnie B

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Jeanine replied on Mon, Aug 13 2012 10:32 AM

I would definitely start with stitch in the ditch with a walking foot to get comfortable with quilting.  You can expand from there.

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Aleta replied on Wed, Aug 15 2012 7:04 PM

Depending on the design of your quilt, you may want to consider doing a grid pattern using a walking foot with a seam guide.

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polkij replied on Wed, Aug 15 2012 7:16 PM

Can you tell me how to do that, I considered that because i just recently found a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I actually considered that i am going to try to find the instruction for how to that and if it's something a beginner can do...

any thoughts??

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pamela replied on Mon, Aug 20 2012 7:50 PM

polkij:
Can you tell me how to do that

My walking foot came with seam guide attachments that fit through the back of the foot and held firmly by tighting a screw. One is for a guide on the left side and the other for the right; and they can be adjusted to different widths. I draw the first line of the grid and stitch the first row. Then, the next row is stitched so that the seam guide moves along the previous stitching. That way, the rows are stitched at an even distance from each other. Be sure to keep your eye on the seam guide while you stitch, and not the machine's needle.

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