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MACHINE qUILTING INSPIRATION

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LadyRags Posted: Tue, Dec 29 2009 1:04 PM

I am teaching myself MACHINE QUILTING by domestic machine and would like to see pictures of other quilters machine quilting.  Please post close up pictures of samples of your machine quilting.  

Also post :

1/ Any tips you may have to doing the MQ. 

2/ Any problems you have and how you solved them.

3/ List threads and needles, marking methods, equipment used used with your posts.

4/  Favorite pattern sources, inspiration

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Thea replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 2:03 PM

Lady rags - you would have to look at my pictures of my quilts that already are posted... lol My inspiration comes from the quilt...

I do it on my domestic machine and I do what is called fluff and stuff... The first thing I usually do is stabilize all the different sections and since most of my quilts lately have been samplers I do a different design in each block... I let the quilt tell me what to do and it is all spur of the moment...

I quilted a couple quilts for my girls last year that I marked and I used a plastic tool and just dented the top of the quilt using a pattern that I followed so that the same pattern was in each block.  I have been learning a loop d loop technique and have practiced doing feathers on a couple of my quilts but I don't mark them I just do a thread up through the middle and then feather off from that.

I take it easy as I am doing it as most of my quilts are queen size and it can be draining on your body - I have a table that I put on the other side of my machine to hold the weight.

I always start with a fresh needle and match my bobbin thread to the color on the back - I use the same weight thread in both the top and bottom - I tried bottom line in the bottom but my machine didn't like to work with 2 diifferent weights - my old machine was fine with it.

Take your time and have fun!  Put on a program or music... I listen a lot to TV without watching it...

 

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gini replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 2:46 PM

ladyrags.   i get a big square of scrap fabric, front and back and some batt.   i use these to practice on.  each time, before i quilt ,  i  stitch a little while on these to loosen up.    i look at magazines, and books. there is a good website that has free designs.  i will hunt it up for you.    you can draw out a design on clear plastic and over lay the quilt with it to see if a design will work.    it depends on what look you would like on your quilt, how you quilt it.   check out the library for resources.     gini

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gini replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 2:48 PM
Leah Day <leah@leahday.

ladyrags,  check out this website.    it gives free designs every month    gini 

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MNnancy replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 2:54 PM

I found Machine Quilting: The Basics and Beyond by Lynn Witzenburg to be very helpful.  She has you work through some excellent practice lessons.  The book includes great color photos and clear directions.  It is available from Amazon.

I recently took a class from our LQS on beginning machine quilting.  The only thing I learned there that I hadn't already learned from the book was that a 75/11 needle was better than the larger 90/14 I had been using.

Judy shared a wonderful web site that features a new quilting design each day.  365 Days of Free Motion Quilting Filler Designs.  Great video clips!

Thea, you forgot to provide the tip on the importance of tongue positioning!

 


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gini replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 2:58 PM

nancy, this is a good book.   i forgot about it    gini

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Eileen replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 4:27 PM

LadyRags,

I'm not real good at machine quilting yet - need more practice - but my first book on the topic was

Machine Quilting Made Easy

(Machine Quilting Made Easy) Also available on Amazon.com, but I got it at my LQS. It's published by That Patchwork Place and written by Maurine Noble.  Gini's got a good idea - make some sample sandwiches (maybe 12" to 14" square) to practice on.  The book has suggestions for thread types & needle sizes as well as how far apart you can quilt on different types of batting.  I might look at the one MN Nancy suggested - more sources mean more ideas.

Hope this helps and thanks for asking - I'm sure to get some help, too :-)

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gini replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 6:06 PM

maureen noble used to teach machine quilting and i have heard that she was an excellent teacher.  i don't know if she is still working, but her book must be good.   gini

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Nana replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 6:15 PM

There is also a book out called Machine Quilting with Alex Anderson that is very good.  She goes over all the basics and how to get started and also has a few projects in the book that you can try your new quilting skills on.  Very helpful book.

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Eileen replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 8:39 PM

I got started with my "real" quilting (post first-quilt & pre quilt shop days) with some of Alex Anderson's books - I like them as they're shorter than some books (you know, the 300-pagers), to the point, full of photos and clear explanations.  Good suggestion, Nana!

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Nana replied on Tue, Dec 29 2009 10:41 PM

Eileen:

I got started with my "real" quilting (post first-quilt & pre quilt shop days) with some of Alex Anderson's books - I like them as they're shorter than some books (you know, the 300-pagers), to the point, full of photos and clear explanations.  Good suggestion, Nana!

 

I first decided that I really could make a quilt by watching Alex Anderson on Simply Quilts.  She made quilting seem easy and fun.  Most shows I had watched prior to that had made the process seem so complicated that I never thought it was something that I could do.  Her books are very concise and easy to follow.  She also "speaks" in a language that you can understand if it is your first quilt or your 100th quilt.

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Stephanie replied on Sun, Jan 10 2010 8:33 PM

Ladyrags, I have taught myself to do machine quilting from starting with a quilt sandwich and following the instructions on my machine for setting up. I vary my needles according to the thickness of the batting and so far have quilted with Sulky and Guterman threads with great results for not breaking. I am not locked into them, they were readily available to me. I started my practices with basic stippling and meandering the design looks like puzzle pieces.  I don't have a stitch regulator and my surface wasn't as slippery as I would have liked. When the fabric grabs it causes you to tug or push and results in stitches that will be uneven. Free motion quilting is best done on a level surface, meaning the sewing area is level with the table top.

After I felt comfortable with stippling I purchased a Patsy Thompson DVD on Feathers. I cannot tell you how much I love her DVD. She has them for beginners as well. She is very thorough in her explanation as well as visual aid and she teaches you how to create and do it yourself as well. Practice, practice, practice and don't forget to always do a test sandwich before working on your quilt. My last time I had something threaded wrong and ended up with a big wad of thread tangled in my bobbin that I had to cut the fabric to get in and work it loose. It would have been a disaster on my quilt. Also, for your first quilts I'd recommend matching your thread as close to your fabric as possible. Flaws will be minimized.

I hope this helps and wish you all the best.     

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LadyRags replied on Sun, Jan 10 2010 9:20 PM

I have been making practice pieces  _ (18 x12 to 18 inches) I am hooking  the best of them together into a sofa throw.  I have been going though all the dvds I can get my hand on to review and learn the patterns.  I have been practicing the patterns by first using pencil and paper to train my brain and hand, then using the practice batts.  I use the FUN AND DONE style of hooking them together to make my sofa throw.   I figure when I get the sofa throw done I will have my technique ingrained... (I HOPE)  or at least not be afraid of trying on a real quilt.   I have some baby quilts to practice on before I do a big quilt. 

 

 

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Nana replied on Sun, Jan 10 2010 9:22 PM

Ladyrags

You will get to were you can jump into those bigs quilts without a second thought.  It does get easier with each quilt.  I still haven't got feathers down but maybe someday.

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CJ Hines replied on Mon, Jan 11 2010 10:36 AM

The best tip I can give you is practice, practice, practice! Make a scrap quilt sandwich and practice until you feel comfortable with the speed of your machine and the motion of the fabric. Don't worry about perfection--just go for and it and have fun!

 

 

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