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Embroidery on a quilt top question

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Denise (denilyn) posted on Wed, May 23 2012 6:22 PM
I am in the process of making a wall quilt for my granddaughter. She would like to have butterflies so I decided to cheat and use machine embroidery applique...now comes the question. I have never done this before and am looking for assistance. I do not really want to put the quilt top in the hoop because it will leave marks and sometimes they don't iron out very nicely. I was told to use sticky back wash-away stabilizer, hoop it, peel away the paper and then stick the quilt top to it but I was thinking if I do that then it will not have any real stabilizer behind it. So, then I thought, well maybe I should use that, stick a piece of stabilizer on that, spray that with adhesive and then put the quilt top on that and then embroider it...oh my. Ya think that will gum up my needle and should I use a larger needle...what size? I would like anyone's thought and/or idea on this. Thanks so much, Denilyn
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I have done several quilts with embroidery.  I always embroider the blocks FIRST, then put the top together.  The best way I found was to use the peel and stick tear away stabilizer.  I cut it to fit the hoop, peeled away the backing, placed my fabric on it AND THEN hooped.  It does cause a bit of glue residue on the hoop but you can get that of with Goop away or rubbing alchol.  Be sure to use the proper weight backing for the type of embroidery. Use the needle size you would use for embroidery.  Yes the needle will get gooped up, use "Sewer's Aid" to clean your needles to get longer life out of them. After the embroidery is done then remove the rest of the stabalizer and put your quilt together.  Be careful when pulling away nthe stablizer that you do not unravel the edges of your material.

If you can not do the blocks first, follow the same procedure with the whole quilt.  I found that any hooping marks were removed in the wash.  Hope this helps

 Elizabeth

From Sunny Southern CA

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Ramona replied on Thu, May 24 2012 2:48 PM

Denise aka denilyn,

If  the portion of the quilt you want your applique on is 100% cotton then I would use a tear-a-way stabilizer.  Since it's  applique and not a dense design you should be ok. For a more dense design you could use a lightweight cut-a-way.  You also do not need the sticky stabilizer if you have a "fix" button on your embroidery machine that will stitch around the design to hold the top in place while the design stitches. It's your choice.  I've done a lot of embroidery machine applique and love it and so will you. 

Don't forget that you can use your embroidery machine to do some quilting. Maybe a butterfly in each corner of the quilt? If you do that and want to hoop the quilt, then you need a hoop that is designed for quilting. Mine is called a "Do All Quilters Hoop". I have a Husqvarna Viking embroidery machine. You would not need any stabilizer as the batting and backing are sufficient. You would use the same thread in the bobbin that you use in the top. You could also just use the fix stitch to hold it in the hoop. If you do hoop the quilt, then the markings will come out when washed as mentioned by Elizabeth.

Can't wait to see your project!

 

 

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Cindi replied on Thu, May 24 2012 8:54 PM

I've embroidered on a "whole" quilt top before.  It can be done, but I agree, embroiderying block by block is easier especially if you are a beginner.  Either way this is what I do:

Hoop your stabilizer.  Just your stabilizer.  Since you are appliquing I would use a tear away, but if you want something permanent a light weight cutaway might be okay.  This is something you want to experiment with first to see which you like better.

Spray the hooped stablizer with KK2000 (http://www.sulky.com/adhesives/index_adhesives.php ).  Lay the quilt block on the stabilizer and adjust as needed until the portion of the block you want to embroider on is centered in the hoop.

Start the applique according to the instructions that should have come with your design.  Always test your design on scraps before putting it on the real thing!

If you are going to applique on the whole top (because you want to applique across seams) use pins on the corners of the stablizer that hang off the edge of  the hoop.  BE CERTAIN THOSE PINS CAN'T SLIP INTO THE PATH OF THE NEEDLE!  And if you are appliquing across a seam, do a sample first.  My machine really doesn't like to embroider over seams depending on the design.

Good luck!

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Many, many thanks to everyone for answering this. This is not a quilt with blocks, it is a panel with hand appliqued flowers. Her theme for her room is garden so we decided to make dresden flowers but then she decided she wanted some butterflies on it. After toying with the idea of making dresden butterflies I decided to use machine embroidery appliqued butterflies..am ready for this to be completed so I can move on to my next project...been working on this too long already...LOL. I went today to the embroidery shop and purchased an adhesive tear-away stabilizer and after that I realized I have the basting feature on my machine...was having a bit brain fade I think...LOL but will probably use both just to be sure. I have the Brother Innovis Duetta 4500 which is a great machine; although it too can be a bit touchy...some threads it just does not like. I used to embroider a lot but have never tackled the embroidery applique and I have been so busy with life and being hooked on quilts, I have not embroidered for a while so feeling a bit intimidated...here is hoping all goes well...LOL. I will definitely do one on scrap to be sure before I tackle the quilt....I would hate to have to tear it out and start all over...been there and done that, and what a challenge that was. Hopefully by tomorrow this will be completed and then I can move on to the actual quilting and binding. Take care ladies and again...a big thank you. Denilyn
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ls2116 replied on Thu, May 24 2012 11:27 PM

I was just gonna say i'd use cut away or tear away hope all goes well.

Quilting My Rainbow

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flipin replied on Mon, Jun 10 2013 10:38 AM

I was taught to use an iron on woven interfacing and a medium to heavy weight tear away stabilizer.  the iron on woven interfacing keeps your quilt nicer especially if its ever washed.

A day stitched in prayer

Seldom unravels.

 

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flipin replied on Mon, Jun 10 2013 10:45 AM

I was also taught to cut strips of my material about 2 inches larger than my squares, embroidery down the strip then cut out your squares.  If I don't want to put my strip in the actual hoop, I hoop my tear away then spray int with adhesive quilting spray, place my strip on top and baste around the edge to hold it in place until I'm finished with that embroidery.

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flipin replied on Mon, Jun 10 2013 10:47 AM

On needle size I use a 80/12 embroidery for most everything, sometimes a 75/11 embroidery needle.

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