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Is it considered a "Quilt" if...

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cviens posted on Thu, Nov 17 2011 10:17 AM

Just recently, I had a discussion with a die hard handquilter who said to me, that if I tied the quilts that I am making for my grandchildren for Christmas, that it isnt considered a "real quilt". That if you "tie" your quilt it is really considered a comforter....what is the consensus of the quilters out there?Because of her statement, I am only halfway through machine quilting the first one, and it isnt getting the "handmade" look. Just curious to see what others think.

Thanks!
Carol

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abcd replied on Fri, Nov 18 2011 4:39 AM

Yeah, well - I know a lot of people who don't think it is a comforter unless it says "Jack Daniels" or "Jim Beam"......  :D

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Diana replied on Fri, Nov 18 2011 5:46 AM

I was once told that if a quilt is not totally done by hand, it's not a quilt.   If our great-great-grandmothers had sewing machines, nothing would have been done by hand.  I can make more quilts to donate to those that need them because I sew them by machines and tie them.  I do have some quilts long-arm quilted that are special gifts for family or friends.  I've even hand quilted 2 small wall hangings for special people.    If donating tied quilts are a sin.....i'm guilty as heck.  Every quilt I make is made with love and compassion. 

Diana in East Tn.

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cviens replied on Fri, Nov 18 2011 7:04 AM

Thank you all for replying! You have made me feel SO much better! Now I can finish those quilts with the good feeling that i am giving each of my grandchildren a "quilt" from Grammy! (big sigh of relief)!

Carol

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When I learned to quilt back in the 80's the instructor gave us the Rail Fence pattern and we had the option to either quilt it or tie it.  It was considered a quilt.

 

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Love it!  even the experts disagree.  Is it time for a quilt sit in, an occupy the quilt shop uprising?  At least we'd be warm and could keep busy and not have any violence.  :)

 

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abcd replied on Fri, Nov 18 2011 8:18 AM

Charlie Disante:

Love it!  even the experts disagree.  Is it time for a quilt sit in, an occupy the quilt shop uprising?  At least we'd be warm and could keep busy and not have any violence.  :)

 

Ah, yes!  "Experts"!! Then you could get into ALL sorts of discussions on whether it "is it, or isn't it"???  First it's hand tying vs sewing, then it's sewed by MACHINE (including the piecing) or HAND pieced, then it could be "art" quilts vs "traditional patterns", then it could be "new" fabric (including pattern and dyes) vs "reproduction" fabric, (including flour sacks)...... especially the DYES. I know one woman who teaches nothing BUT Civil War quilts, and no red will please her except Turkey Red.  I mean, there is a reason  there isn't a call for JUST Turkey Red anymore.  Even the women from the past didn't care for it much, it is just all that they had, or else they wouldn't have kept on trying to get a "true red" color to begin with!  Better stick to the dictionary definition as to what is a quilt, or else you are arguing "emotional" and "esthetic" opinions.  And opinions are just that:  only opinions.

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I think hand tied quilts are amazing and very traditional. I love them.

Glenda

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Carey replied on Fri, Nov 18 2011 9:41 PM

I agree with the quilters that say if it has more than one layer it is a quilt. Has nothing to do with being tied you're doing it with love to thats a biggie in our books :)

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I don't know "where you all are from", LOL but when I lived in TN, I was also told if it is tied, it is a comforter, not a quilt. I was raised in OH, and I remember tied "quilts" out of wool that were too heavy to be hand quilted but had to be tied. I guess it is up to the region your from, the guild you belong to, the show you enter your quilt in, or the heart that makes the "quilt" with love, and the person who sleeps under the "quilt". I personally think it is what the maker says it is!

 

 

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I just looked in the QCA quilting Dictionary on this site and this is what it said:

A comforter is a tied bed covering with a thick filler.

A quilt consists of two layers of fabric with a filling between them and is traditionally used as a bedcover.

 

 

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abcd replied on Sat, Nov 19 2011 8:52 AM

So how come I bought a thick SEWED "comforter" from J.C. Penneys' that cost $100?  ;D

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"Die hards" have ideas that never actually die. I love tied quilts. To me, a comforter is something that is made of one fabric piece for each side with a very fluffy center. If you piece the top, it's a quilt whether you hand quilt, machine quilt or tie it. My first quilt teacher was a hand quilt fanatic. I asked if she had a quilting foot for my machine. Her answer? "If you are going to machine quilt it, just buy one at Penneys"

That was back when I worked full time and had teens in my home. She really took me aback with that comment and I did very little quilting after that. 

Now I quilt for myself. If someone doesn't like the way I do it, they needn't look at my quilts. I'm old enough to say I don't give a rat's a$$ what others think of me...just what I think of me. It took me many years to get to this place.

If a guild doesn't want my quilts, that's fine. It's not why I do it.

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Pamela replied on Sat, Nov 19 2011 9:42 AM

I have also had another quilter express the same sentiment and was insulted that she considered my creation inferior to hers.

MY THOUGHTS:

The term "quilt" has become synonymous with patchwork that many claim first started in America. Today, we all refer to the bedcoverings that we make of three layers - pieced top, batting and backing - as a quilt.

Quilted materials are thought to have originated in the Orient and spread to Europe along trade routes. The earliest examples of quilted items in Britain was as protective armour, not bedcoverings. There have been many types of bedcoverings over the years, with "quilts" used more recently. Other types of bed coverings, in the early years of settlers to this country, included Bed Ruggs, Counterpanes, and Coverlets. Many bedcoverings in museum textile collections are of these types and include wholecloth pieces that were appliqued or embroidered. They were not always "quilted" or stitched to hold the pieces together. Most bedcoverings were made for warmth and were often crude examples, which generally did not survive for us to see because heavy use. Counterpanes were the topmost bedcovering and were the best the family had, intended for show, not warmth. I believe that this is what we all think of when we say "quilt". Patchwork quilts came along when women, due to economics, could not afford the high price of fabric and began using scraps of clothing and fabric to piece together bedcoverings.

I would suggest that the word "quilt" within the larger quilting community refers more to how the an item is put together rather than what the item "is". That is why major quilt shows do not accept tied items into their juried shows. Local quilt guild organizations are the grassroutes of these larger organizations, of which I belong to several. These organizations define a quilt based upon the mission of their organization.

I still consider all of the items discussed to be QUILTS. Do we really need to be technical about a craft we create with such passion and provide to those we love dearly. It's irrelevant to me what someone else calls it.

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Cathie replied on Sat, Nov 19 2011 1:09 PM

here's what wikipedea says

A quilt is a type of bed cover, traditionally composed of three layers of fiber: a woven cloth top, a layer of batting or wadding and a woven back, combined using the technique of quilting. “Quilting” refers to the technique of joining at least two fabric layers by stitches or ties

Cathie     Mt Joy pA

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A quilt is in the eyes of the maker and in the love delivered to the recipient.  I am luckily not all that concerned with what others think when it comes to legalism about whatever subject we are talking about but especially quilting ... and religion.  

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