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3D Applique/embroidery quilt and 2 other machine embroidery quilts

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Ramona posted on Tue, Sep 6 2011 5:46 PM

I need some quilting advice please. I have a friend who is bringing 3 quilts to me this weekend. One is a 3D applique and embroidery quilt and two others are machine applique. I have never quilted anything like these before and need some quilting methods. FYI, she is going to enter these in a quilt show in a week.

I believe just the 3D quilt has batting behind each block but not behind the sashing and borders. I will be adding a layer of batting in the entire quilt when I put it on the frame. I have no idea how to quilt this type of quilt. I know the blocks will need more quilting than to stitch in the ditch. I have purchased Bottom Line thread in the quilt's colors so hopefully my mistakes won't show too bad. As for the other two applique quilts I considered echo quilting with some embellishing in the leaves and flowers. Does anyone have any ideas for  any of these three quilts??  Appreciate any help.

I won't be on this evening  asI need to head to the house to fix dinner. I will get any advice you can provide in the a.m. Here are pictures of the 3D quilt and one of the machine embroidery quilts. The third quilt is the same as the colorful machine embroidery one but in a different color scheme.

Thanking you in advance.

 

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Nana replied on Tue, Sep 6 2011 6:55 PM

Ramona

These quilts are stunning.  In the first one with all the antique looking applique and embroidery I would stipple in the open spaces of each block to make the design pop,  Then maybe a vine pattern in the sashing. or feathers.    The last one I would echo around the flowers.

Vinton, Virginia

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gini replied on Tue, Sep 6 2011 7:04 PM

ramona, i agree with nana

gini in north idaho

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Ramona replied on Wed, Sep 7 2011 10:31 AM

Nana and Gini,

Thank you so much for your response! That is exactly what I will ATTEMPT to do. I appreciate your suggestions and will post pictures when I complete them.

Is there a trick to doing the echo quilting besides trying to use the hopping foot as measurement? In my mind I'm thinking to look more where you're going instead of where the needle is at??? What technique do you use? Do you use a ruler of some sort for this?

 I have done meandering but not stipple. I hope I can get it small enough. I think I can do the leaves or vines in the sashings. If not, I may do loops. I need to find something for the outside border on the first one.  In the cornerstones do you do a swirl or flower?

Thanks again for your help.

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gini replied on Wed, Sep 7 2011 10:52 AM

ramona, i go slow and eyeball it

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Gini,

Can I trouble you to answer a few  more questions.......I was wondering if I have to stabilize each block before doing any quilting in it? What would happen if I decide not to do this? If I need to stabilize each block do I HAVE to do the whole quilt before I do any quilting or can I do it as I go along?

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Nana replied on Thu, Sep 8 2011 8:08 PM

Ramona

The few times that I have quilted blocks as I go I haven't liked the finished product as well.  I always piece my whole top and then quilt.   I do occasionally do my quilt top in "rounds" and quilt as I go.  I do the entire backing and then do a big center segment of the quilt top.  Center the top onto the backing and quilt that portion and then sew the next round or two of blocks and quilt those and keep going until I am finished.

I have also pieced my top in thirds with all the backing made.  I quilt the first third and then sew the next quilt top section to the quilted section and continue in this manner until it is finished.

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Nana,

Not sure, but I'm thinking we are talking two different things. I'm not asking my questions correctly. I had a question on the applique block quilts. I have heard that when a quilter does "specialty" free motion quilting in each block they stitch in the ditch over the entire quilt to stabilize the quilt before doing their specialty quilting in each block.  So I was wondering if I have to do the whole quilt or can I stabilize as I go along. I also was wondering if I have to stitch in the ditch at all or can I just do my specialty quilting? Hope I've said this right. :-)

Sorry Nana, what I'm getting out of your answer is like make a quilt as you go. I'm wanting to know about the quilting of a pieced quilt top. I do apologize if I'm not using proper terms here.

Thank you.

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Nana replied on Thu, Sep 8 2011 9:51 PM

Ramona

I think it was me that didn't understand your question...LOL>  That happens sometimes and I am not even blonde.   I don't usually stabilize my blocks with stitch in the ditch.   I start in the center of the quilt and quilt one quarter of the quilt at a time working my way from the center to the edge.  I do alot of smoothing along the way to make sure everything is staying flat.  

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gini replied on Thu, Sep 8 2011 9:54 PM

ramona,   if i understand your question correctly,  what you are referring to as stablizing, is called basting.   stabilizing, is backing the fabric or block with a stabiliser, so it doesn't pucker when you are doing something like machine embroidery.   basting, is when you stabilize the layers of the quil so they don't shift during quilting.   confusing, i know, because sometimes the basting you are talking about is called stabilizing the quilt. 

so, basting:    you need to baste (stabilize) the entire quilt at once.    the quilting itself can and does shift the layers as you quilt.   the closer your basting stitches, the less shifting your quilt will do.   if you only baste/stabilize you quilt a little at a time, the layers can shift enough that the top will go off the batt and back. then you really have  a problem.    there are different methods of basting, ie., safety pins, hand basting with needle and thread, spray on glue made especially for spray basting, and the stabilizing you are talking about. 

i don't know if i answered your question.    you need to baste or stabilize the entire quilt, then do the fancy quilting inside the blocks.    i  baste my quilts pretty closely by hand.  across, up and down and diagonally, about 6 or less inches apart.  that holds my quilt well enough that it doesn't shift.  and when i am really lazy, i have a LA quilter baste it for me. 

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gini replied on Thu, Sep 8 2011 10:07 PM

dang i wrote this big long answer and it disappeared in the cyber vacuum.    i'll try again.

ramona,  what you are referring to is called basting.  that is,  securing the layers so you can quilt them. sometimes, the method you are referring to is called stabilizing.  confusing, i know.   if you baste/stabilize as you go,  the layers can shift  away from each other, sometimes  by inches. you can end up with not enough backing and batting for your top, and  you can end up with puckers.   there are several basting/stabilizing methods.   i use hand basting with a needle and thread, or if i am particularly lazy, i will take it  to a LAquilter for the basting.   you can use safety pins, or spray glue made especially for basting quilts.  and of course the method you are referring to with the stitch in the ditch.  

so, you need to do all the stabilizing/ basting before you start the fancy quilting in the individual blocks.  and believe me, if you have all your basting done first,  the quilting goes like a breeze.  well maybe not that easily,  but it makes it much nicer.  

  so, nana, if you are stabilizing like ramona is talking about, does it need to be "basted before the stabilizing is done?   i don't see how that could work.  i think it needs to be basted, then stitched in the ditch, then the fancy stitching.  

ok, i'm thinking as i'm writing.   not a good situation. 

if the quilt is going to be "stabilized" with in the ditch quilting,   it will have to be basted first.   isn't that redundant,   why bother with the stitch in the ditch if it is already basted.   do you get more control? 

  sorry ramona, i'm thinking out loud. hopefully someone who has done this method, will see our posts and lead us out of this quagmire.

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gini replied on Thu, Sep 8 2011 10:08 PM

and here my first post showed up,  go figure.   i just love redundancy.     :  )  

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Nana replied on Thu, Sep 8 2011 10:22 PM

Gini

You are right.  If Ramona is asking about "general stabilizing" I wouldn't do stitch in the ditch.  I guess I don't think about basting because I use the spray most of the time.   And for some reason tonight my blonde roots are showing terribly.

I would use basting spray or pins or thread and "baste" my quilt then start quilting in the center and working toward the edges.

Do you think we have confused Ramona enough for one night....LOL>

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I just wanted to tell you how beautiful those quilts are. I hope everything turns out well for you. I am just starting to do other peoples quilts, and I am learning so much from people like you, Nana, Gina. I can't give an opion because of lack of experience, but I do think part of the stabilizing depends on whether you are machine quilting it or Long arm using a frame. I use a frame and the back is secured on two rollers and the top is secured between a roller and basted at the top. The batting holds the top quite well, but I do have to pay attention as I quilt to make sure it is staying flat. Some quilts are not square so as you quilt you apply a little pressure here and there to help it lay flat. From the looks of the embroderery quilts on a frame they should stay being basted at the top and smoothed from the center out and basted on the sides as you go. (I frankly have only had quilts that if anchored on the sides tended to want to pleat in  spots, so I don't baste on the sides. Again I am just a learer and of the dozen or so quilters I've been listening to, what works for one may not work as well for another or both opions work well.)

I would make a test run on a practice piece with the stippling and echoing until you feel comfortable with the results. I know it cost money to make practice pieces-my husband complains-but personally, I don't want to try something new on someone's quilt especially if they are going to enter it in a show.

I hope the quilting goes well. I will be looking for the results although I have been trying to conquer the gallery on QAC and still haven't. I am going to try to post some pictures tonight.

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Thanks Nana,

Think I've got it now. LOL

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