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How much fabric?

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Ramona replied on Thu, Aug 25 2011 7:40 PM

Guess you're having a very exciting week. Having lived in Florida hurricanes are not anything to take lightly. Be safe! Hugs

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Angele replied on Sat, Aug 27 2011 7:01 PM

I am curious, as I am not familiar with the term.  What are pantographs??  I guessed that they are like stencils?  Maybe I am wrong.  Must be .... I can't figure it out.  So help me understand please. 

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Ramona replied on Sat, Aug 27 2011 7:16 PM

Hi Angele,

A pantograph is a pattern printed on a roll of paper and is used for longarm quilters. We unroll the pattern and lay it on our longarm tables and then follow the pattern with a laser light. When doing this we are quilting from the back of our machines.

 

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Hi Angele - yes they are kind of like stencils.  It's a continuous line pattern that is printed on a long sheet oof paper (as long as your long arm machine - mine is 14 feet).  The sheet gets placed under a plastic cover on the table on the back of your machine.  Then you use a laser light on the machine to trace it.  While you are tracing it on the back of the machine, the pattern is being stitched by the longarm on the quilt.   Hope that helps. 

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Hi all - I am looking for someone who currently has the Hartley Micro Drive handles for their long arm machine.  Anyone out there have them? 

 

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Peggy replied on Sat, Aug 27 2011 7:34 PM

I also heard that buying 3 yards was the safe bet.  but if you don't have a project ia always buy 2 fat quarters

then I work from there. 

from Minnesota

 

 

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MNnancy replied on Sat, Aug 27 2011 10:00 PM

Charlotte, you might try posting your question about handles to the "Longarmers Share" discussion thread.  Some of the longarmers may not be following this particular conversation on stash building.


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Angele replied on Tue, Aug 30 2011 9:45 PM

Thanks Ramona C and Charlotte for the information.  Yes this really helps.  I don't know much about how long arm machines work but this really helps.

Angele

Angèle  from NWO

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grammcl replied on Fri, Sep 2 2011 1:00 PM

I prefer my quilt store but will shop Joanns for small wall hangings or "no touch" projects.  I have such a large stash that I try to use fabric from it first.  lol  That doesn't always work however.  When I first started quilting I bought 4-5 yards of many different whites that I thought I would use for backing.  That was about 12 years ago and I still have most of it left.  A friend tried to tell me how to buy fabric and I didn't believe her.  How could one yard of fabric make a quilt????  Many fond memories of our quilting together. 

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How much should you buy of a fabric when you don't have a project? Ask yourself questions: Are you a scrappy quilter or a planned quilter? How much do you really it? How well does it fit into your stash? What is your fabric budget? If you are scrappy, then you will want to purchase somewhere between fat eighths, fat quarters, or half yards. If you are a planner, you will want to purchase anywhere from half yards to multiple yards. If you really, really like it, purchse more. If you merely like it, buy less. If you have a big fabric budget, purchase however much you want. If you have a smaller budget, you will want to limit the purchase of this fabric you like so you have money for the fabric you see at the next store that you just HAVE to have. If it fits too well into your stash, you may already have fabrics that are so similar that you might not want to buy it at all. If it fills in the missing spot in your stash, purchase enough to fill the empty spot in the stash. If it doesn't fit in your stash, then maybe your tastes are changing and you need to begin the new era in stash building.  No one answer to this question is correct or incorrect. The answer ti this is personal for every quilter.

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Angele replied on Sat, Sep 3 2011 3:38 PM

Quilt Daddy, I love your way of purchasing fabric.  I rarely buy more than 2-3 yards of one fabric unless I have a specific project in mind, but looking at your perspective, I might just buy more.  ;)

Angele

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MNnancy replied on Sat, Sep 3 2011 5:03 PM

angelheartiowa:
If it doesn't fit in your stash, then maybe your tastes are changing and you need to begin the new era in stash building.  No one answer to this question is correct or incorrect. The answer ti this is personal for every quilter.

Angel Heart,

I really like your full answer.  Ultimately you're right - it's a personal decision.  The comment about tastes changing worries me because I believe that's true, but unfortunately I don't complete quilts quickly enough to work through the fabrics I bought for today but may not care as much for tomorrow.  I probably need to slow down my stash acquisitions, but unfortunately since I've retired, I have been invited on more and more shop hops.  Such a dilemma....


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Nana replied on Sat, Sep 3 2011 9:12 PM

Nancy

You just keep buying the fabrics you love.  If you for some reason you don't like them "tomorrow" you will probably like them again one of the next "tomorrows".....

Vinton, Virginia

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Minnesota Nancy,

Tastes do change, that is a fact. There is always a way to take care of what is no longer to your liking. Using it in a donation quilt. Giving it to a newbie quilter who hasn't the money to build up a stash and would appreciate any fabric, her colors or not. Making a totally scrappy quilt. (There many fabulous and easy patterns [especially "string quilt' patterns] that quickly use up stash.) You can cut out-dated (or out-tasted) stash up into squares, HSTs, QSTs, rectangles, etc into sizes that work together. Pick out a patterns that uses those pieces and use them in "enders and leaders" style to piece a scrap quilt while intentionally piecing a quilt that is in your current color and style taste. There is a book out about leaders and enders piecing. I like using patterns from Pat Speth's nickle quilts books, as well as books by Judy Martin, and Marti Michell. There are other great resources for blocks that work well in scrappy quilts.

I, too, have come to a point where I don't purchase very much fabric. Mostly, I find neutrals because I don't have enough to go with all of my non-background fabrics. I am nearing retirement when I will have a lot more time to piece quilts. I decided that I can't die until I use up all of my stash. Right now, I have to live to be at least 369. On the other hand, I have named a heir for my book, pattern, and fabric stash: my daughter-in-law. However, she understands that if I get another d-i-l (or 2) who quilts, she has to share with her (them).    

Iowa Angel (on the banks of the Mississippi River in Des Moines)

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