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Sewing Machines

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Alice posted on Tue, Aug 2 2011 2:27 PM

I would like al opinions please

I have 2 Husqvarna Designerer ll and the quilter and I spend more time fighting with them re threading them than sewing on them. I take them in every year for maintence cleaning with my notesof how awful they sew for me. I always see the bottom thread  I do play with the tension  in minut increments, no help I think  I have lemons My quilts are lemons. I was thinking of a cheap singer quileter thats advertised in JoAnns paper this week for $299 or look for a usded baby lock  melody  HELP?  ALICE

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Suggested by Pamela

Have you considered that the thread might be the problem? I used to sew with Coats & Clark thread all the time on my cheap Singer. But, I cannot use it in my computerized Bernina. The manufacturer also does not recommend it. The modern computerized machines are much more particular and using a higher quality thread can save a lot of frustration. You paid the bucks for the machine; pay for the better thread.

I woudln't go back to my cheap Singer for anything. The Bernina can do so much more. If all you are doing is sewing a 1/4" seam, than maybe the cheaper machine will do, but I do FMQ and have multiple embroidery stitches that I've used, as well. Those features are available on most cheaper machines.

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I agree with Pamela. Also, I was having lots of tread breakage problems with my Megaquilter until a kind person suggested I use a topstitch needle to help the thread make a smooth passage and reduce friction. I use either Mettler or Guterman 100% cotton thread and have not had a speck of trouble with either the Designer 1 or the Rose - I love them both, and would never consider going back to a machine of lesser quality.

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Kris replied on Wed, Aug 3 2011 11:38 PM

Gin:
But I do keep a can of air beside my machines to get the lint out when I change the bobbins.  I buy 4 to 6 cans at a time - half for my computer key boards and half for my sewing machines.

I don't think canned air is good for your sewing machine.  It pushes the dirt further into your machine and can cause rust. Be careful with it. Many manufacturers advise against it. Check your manual or your dealer before using the can.

Try manual cleaning with the lint brush that came with your machine or buy the vacuum attachments that are made for sewing machines, computer keyboards etc. I have a set and they work great.

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Nana replied on Thu, Aug 4 2011 7:27 AM

Kris

I have a set of the vac attachments and love them.  I use the brush when I change bobbins and once a day take everything apart and clean with the brush.  Then at least once a week I will use the vacuum attachment and give the machine a really good cleaning.  I agree the canned air is very bad for a sewing machine.  It puts the lint and dust deeper into the machine and can "gum up' the moving parts.

Vinton, Virginia

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Nana,when I purchased my Janome ,I did ask about using the canned air and  the salesman told me not to use it Don't really remember why but something about the canned air being cold when It comes out was not good for the parts ..or something to that effect. Barbara

Liberty,Missouri

EAT!! SLEEP !! QUILT!!

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gini replied on Thu, Aug 4 2011 8:46 AM

i was told by one husqvarna repair man to never use canned air, and i was told by another husqvarna repair woman, to use canned air regularly?  what's a girl to do?

gini in north idaho

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Pat replied on Thu, Aug 4 2011 9:20 AM

 

During a maintenace class for sewing machines, I was also told not to blow out any lint as there is moisture in your breathe that could cause rust on various machine parts.

Pat

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I have 2 Singer open arm portables and I wouldn't have any other. I use them for everything I do in quilting. Neither cost over $200 new. I have always fund that the pricer and big name machines are all hype and you are paying for the name. I am able to clean, oil and take care of my machines and they are just aout never in the shop. I had a sewing machine repairman tell me years ago how to take care of my machines and he has been right for 27 years. When you clean lint use a q-tip with rubbing alochol on it and a brush to clean everything. Let air dry (it evaporates)and oil it . Use a good quility thread and you won't have excesive lint build up. Coats and Clark thread hs one of the highest amounts of lint of any thread. The best thread I have found wih very low lint is Essentials from Connecting Threads. I took a class in a shop and we used Baby loc, Bernina, and Janome machines. None of the class liked any of the machines except the Janome. I think and machine I ca't take care of myelf is not the machine for me. Ths is after 50 years of sewing and quilting experience. Also the statement about the threemchines being made by the same company is not true. Singer now owns the companys but each still makes their own machines. Knmores are made by whatever company Sears conracts with to make them. It is usually a different company every time they change contracts. I hope this clears somethings up and gives some information about items. A fancy machine with all the " Bells and whistles" is not necessary for making quilts. All the extras are just something extra to go wrong.

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I have a Viking Platinum and I have never experienced these kinds of problems.  I agree with some of the other posters - it's your dealer who's a lemon!  You should definitely contact the company about that because I'm sure they wouldn't want the face of their product to be nasty and incapable of fixing the machine.

You definitely should clean out the bobbin case with the little brush that comes with it.  It's amazing how much lint can build up in there, especially if you are using flannel. Also, don't use that Coats and Clark thread (BTW, the Essentials thread at Connecting Threads is made by C&C).  I like Sulky.

That said, you obviously hate your machines so I think it might be time to make yourself happy and look at other machines.  I have a friend who has a Janome which she really likes.  I would go to a dealer of Bernina or Janome and test drive, test drive, test drive a few machines.  Most dealers would have some trade-ins which would be less expensive also, and you could trade in your machine(s) for a used machine.

I hope you can find something you like! 

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I have a brother quattro 6000 that I love and have never had a moments problem with.   I had a cheaper Brother before and it is also going strong.  The older brother is not as picky about thread as the quanttro.   I think it is the difference between mechanical and computerized.

When I got the quattro the dealer told me to use the compressed air, and that they used it there.  Then I got to seeing all the articles on not using it.  So I contacted brother and they said to not use air on a computerized machine.  It was ok on the mechanical but can push lint into the area where the belt turns. 

I have had many complaints about the Brother dealer that is 85 miles away from me, I keep complaining to brother in hopes they will put pressure on this dealer to clean up his act and to literally clean his store. (it is the dirtest retail store I have ever been in.)  Would be nice if there was another brother dealer around.

Granny M

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I have a small air compressor to clean out my machines.  I know this is a more expensive option but I think it works well.  It can get the gunk out of areas I didn't think anything could go.  And my husband works for a tool company so I do have an "in" there.  But it is so much better than canned air.

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abcd replied on Sun, Aug 14 2011 10:22 AM

I would definitely say to do test drives, especially on floor machines.  If you fall in love with a particular "floor" model, I would suggest that you try and buy THAT machine, not just the MODEL.  I bought my Bernina that way.  It is my second Bernina, after 35 years.  I kept the first one as well, as it is an electronic model, and does not have all the "bells and whistles" - it is just that NOW I WANT those bells and whistles, and I am in love!

That being said, my dealer also sells Janome, and I almost bought one of those.  Sometimes it is the "little things" that will attract you:  such as a wider and lower "bed" that the fabric will roll over (I almost got one of those) BUT - when my bobbin runs out of thread, I like to be able to take out my bobbin and leave my fabric right where it is - between the needle and the feed dogs - and some models have the bobbin case there so you have to take out the fabric BEFORE you can switch out the bobbin.  Now my new Bernina has a "whistle" (a message) that pops up and lets me know when the bobbin is going to run out so I can put in a new bobbin before I am just "punching the fabric with holes" instead of thread.

Also, to support buying the floor model idea - my dealer LOVES to use Bottom Line Thread, and she is working on Berninas and Janomes all day, BUT - my particular "floor model" HATES Bottom Line thread, and loves King Tut cotton, and Isacord poly (the Isacord for the embroidery).  So find out which thread the new machine likes for dinner~!

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greenmonstr:
Also, don't use that Coats and Clark thread (BTW, the Essentials thread at Connecting Threads is made by C&C).

Green Monstr, where did you hear this?


On the banks of the Mississippi River in north central Minnesota (Brainerd lakes area)

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Kris replied on Mon, Aug 15 2011 4:24 AM

greenmonstr:
(BTW, the Essentials thread at Connecting Threads is made by C&C).

"Essential Colors" thread by M'Liss is made by Coats and Clark. Could this be the one you're talking about?

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Nana replied on Mon, Aug 15 2011 8:16 AM

Kris

I too wonder if that was what she was thinking about.  I cannot find any info that says Connecting Threads has their threads made by Coats and Clark.

Vinton, Virginia

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