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quilting on a domestic machine

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skfoster40 posted on Thu, Jul 21 2011 1:40 PM

How is the best way to quilt a full size quilt on my regular macine.  How do you manage all the quilt ( I roll on both  sides of the quilting area)?  How can you manage any kind of design other than straight line Or stippling? Thanks for your  help Sharon

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skfoster40:

How is the best way to quilt a full size quilt on my regular macine.  How do you manage all the quilt ( I roll on both  sides of the quilting area)?  How can you manage any kind of design other than straight line Or stippling? Thanks for your  help Sharon

 I  don't know about "best way", but I sometime quilt large quilts in sections then join the section.   When I don't do that I have to remind myself that I only have to worry about the small section I am working on.  The rest is rolled up.  As long as the section you are workiing on will move freely in all directions, you can use any pattern you want to.   Another thing that helped me was that I enlarged my sewing area.  My machine has a quilting table, I added more at the end of it and have a rolling file cabnit that I put in front of the table.  My quilt is spread out more and is easier to move the section under the needle.   Hope this helps

Granny M

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gini replied on Fri, Jul 22 2011 10:28 PM

skfoster, welcome to the group.  granny is right,   the more surfaces you can put around your sewing table to support the quilt the better. wrestling the beast can be a pain.

gini in north idaho

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I have three long tables in my sewing room and feel like I need another one ;), but NOTHING else will fit!  I really wanted a sewing table, but not enough to replace a longer table for it.  So, I gave up being able to drop the machine into a table and decided to build up the table around the machine.  I went to my local home improvement which is Lowe's and found some styrofoamy insulation that I used to build a sewing platform around my machine.  Once I got it cut out and fitting perfectly around the machine, I bought pretty drawer liner sticky paper and covered it.  In addition, I got a yard of thick vinyl with ladybugs on it to lay on top of that to make my own supersized super slider!  Taking the weight off the quilt by having room for it to lie around the machine is the key.  Simply concentrate on one small working section at a time and you'll do great.  Good Luck!

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Nana replied on Fri, Jul 22 2011 11:07 PM

I agree with everyone else.  The more support you have for your quilt the better.  Then just work on the area you have exposed under the machine.  Relax and have fun.  It gets easier with each quilt and you soon learn what works for you.

Vinton, Virginia

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Sharon,

I don't roll my large quilts. I leave them free and smoosh them out all around my machine until I have enough area to free motion quilt a section at a time, starting from the center and working my way out. It's a process to keep manipulating the quilt and recommend frequent breaks to relax and stretch.   

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gini replied on Sat, Jul 23 2011 10:31 AM

stephanie, i like your term smoosh,  i'm a smoosher, too. 

gini in north idaho

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Barbara replied on Sat, Jul 23 2011 12:40 PM

What a wonderful idea you came up with. I would have never thought of using styrofoam.You should enter this in the tiips   contest or what ever for others to see ...Barbara

Liberty,Missouri

EAT!! SLEEP !! QUILT!!

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Nana replied on Sat, Jul 23 2011 2:42 PM

I don't roll my quilts either.  I more fluff and stuff or as Stephanie would say.....smoosh.....

Vinton, Virginia

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I, too, am of the smoosh persuasion.  I find that rolling it up is like wrestling a telephone pole.  Also, I have just one 5' long table.  Sometimes lower my ironing board to table height to help with the load out to the left side of my machine. 

One thing I find to be SUPER IMPORTANT is good basting.  I do it old school across the bar in my kitchen, with a big ol' needle and crochet thread.  I like the texture of the thread with the batting & all.  It gives me motivation to clean my bar off, too.

I start in the middle and work out all the way to the right side.  Then I turn it around & do the same thing again.  Also, I prefer to start with the bulk of the project out behind my machine & begin pulling the quilt to me as I go.  That way I can see everything & not have to worry about quilting over existing quilting. 

Above all, Be strong and of good courage!  Yes you can do this!   Let's face it, in the world in general, do we know anybody else (outside our quilting family) who can do this?

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Karla replied on Thu, Jul 28 2011 2:05 PM

Sometimes I roll (like I was taught) and sometimes I "smoosh", depending upon just how big the quilt is.  I recently invested in a midarm and frame, so if it is a large quilt I just load it on the frame.  That can be quite a chore also, as getting it straight by yourself is quite a challenge.

Karla, Fernley, NV

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Mary replied on Thu, Jul 28 2011 2:20 PM

I have struggled with this problem, too.  Thank you all for your replys.  All these ideas will be helpful for my next project, a queen sized quilt for my brother.  This will be my biggest project ever.  Can't wait to dive into the fabric and start creating. 

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Kay replied on Thu, Jul 28 2011 2:32 PM

I really like the idea of building out around the machine.  I gave up when it was too hard to move the quilt around because I don't even have a quilt table (old machine).  I actually think I could do a styrofoam with a vinyl cover and a few tables.

Thank goodness for resourceful quilters who share!

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1. Have lots of support under the quilt...two tables at right angles do it for me.

2. Spray baste really well

3. Stabilize blocks first.

4. work on a quarter at a time...rotating to keep the minimum amount in the arm and most of the fabric on the support table.

5. Puddle rather than roll. At least I find it easier.

 

Marg

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ALL of the above, and when you work in quarters, start from the center and work out. That way you never have more than 1/2 of the quilt in the arm at a time.

I took a class from Sue Nickels, and she quilts award winning king sized quilts on her sewing machine, so it can be done! She has a great book on the subject.

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