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Transferring Redwork pattern onto Muslin

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Sheryl Posted: Tue, Feb 1 2011 12:30 PM

Good Afternoon to All... 
I know that someone out there has some great ideas on how to transfer a Redwork pattern (paper only) onto either Muslin or light cotton.  I do not have a light box  (i've heard of this method), but hoping for a easy solution... any ideas???  Thanks in advance.... Sheryl

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Nana replied on Tue, Feb 1 2011 12:33 PM

Sheryl

You can turn your pattern into a stencil by cutting small spots out and then you can mark your fabric like you would for a quilting stencil.

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Liz K replied on Tue, Feb 1 2011 1:49 PM

Sheryl,

There are several ways you can create your own light box.  You can use a window, use your TV on static, use a piece of glass over a lamp.  To do this you can take the "guts" out of a larger framed picture, hold it on your knees and put a small table lamp between your legs or even place it between two TV trays.  I have found it easier to trace quilting and embroidery patterns if I first transfer them to freezer paper then iron the freezer paper to the back side of my fabric.  It stabilizes the fabric and makes it easier to trace and it keeps the pattern from shifting.  You can also buy several different transfer pens and pencils that allow you to make a pattern by tracing on regular paper and ironing onto your fabric.  What ever method you use just keep in mind that you may have to reverse your design especially if it contains words.

I hope some of my suggestions help.  I found an older light at a garage sale that had a square white opaque lens and had my husband add a cord.  I use that as a light box and it works great.

I hope to see your project when you are done, it sounds great.

Liz

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margoee replied on Tue, Feb 1 2011 7:38 PM

Sheryl...

If you don't own a light box....make sure you ask for one next time your birthday rolls around.....they are wonderful!!  But, back to situation at hand.....tape your pattern to a window, then put your muslin over the top of the pattern and tape the muslin to the window also and trace....works great!  The best tape to use is called carpenter's tape as it will not leave any residue.

Margo

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gini replied on Tue, Feb 1 2011 7:39 PM

welcome sheryl,  thereis a great transfer paper that i love for quilting  it's Saran.   it should work for redwork too.   you lay it over the muslin, put your pattern on top and trace the lines on your pattern.  they will all show up on your muslin.    i tape the muslin down and tape the pattern down, so i can lift the corners and peek .  the saran is reusable until you wear off all the transfer        gini

gini in north idaho

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Sheryl replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 7:43 PM

Thanks to All....

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Linny t replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 8:18 PM

In addition to the great ideas already shared here, there are a couple more that I know of.  First is transfer paper, like the kind used to transfer darts onto clothing.  Just put it between your pattern and fabric and trace over the pattern lines.  Make sure you don't use the waxy kind.  There is also a new product that I have seen, but haven't tried yet.  It is just like transfer paper, except the markings disppear in 48 to 72 hours.  Has anyone tried this yet?

Another method that I use to transfer embroidery patterns for Crazy Quilting is to first trace the pattern onto regular tracing paper.  Then cut out around the tracing, leaving at least 1" tracing paper around the pattern.  Baste this to your fabric.  Then using a running stitch, sew through the lines of your pattern.  Then tear the tracing paper away.  You can remove the running stitches as you embroider.  Depending on the size of your embroidery thread and the color of thread used for your running stitch, sometimes you can just leave the running stitch there because you can't see it.  The best part about this method is that there are no markings on your fabric. 

I also sometimes cut around the pattern and iron it to the center of freezer paper that's as big as your background fabric, that is when I can see my pattern through my background.  First,find the center of the freezer paper, pattern and background fabric by folding in half, then in half again.  Then align the cross folds of the freezer paper and pattern and iron the pattern in place.  Then align the background fabric and press that to the freezer paper.  Then, using the tool of your choice, you can trace the pattern onto the fabric.  The freezer paper acts as a stabilizer making it easier to get the pattern accurate.   

Linny T

 

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ls2116 replied on Sun, Oct 14 2012 6:47 PM

Hi Gini!  I read this it sounds like what i needed for doing quilting motif design transfer.  I guess I have to think of the quilting motifs like applique project.  What does the saran do?

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Thea replied on Sun, Oct 14 2012 8:02 PM

Sheryl, use the new frixion pens to transfer your design - they are the best - they iron away when you want them gone and stay until heat hits them.  If you don't have a light box tape your pattern to a sunny window and tape the fabric over top of it and trace through it - or if you have a piece of glass - tape the pattern to that with the muslin and hold it up so the light is behind it.

 

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ls2116 replied on Mon, Oct 15 2012 5:19 AM

Thanks Thea for the suggestion of frixion might help me with transfering quilting motif.

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Just be sure to test the Frixion on a scrap of YOUR fabric before tracing the design.  On at least some fabrics, there is a "ghost" of the ink after it "disappears".  The ink isn't really gone.  You can prove it by putting the scrap in cold water or even the freezer and it will reappear...  I've had samples where the ink disappeared perfectly with the iron, but a faint white line was still visible in good light.  I only use the Frixion when the lines can't/won't be visible on the quilt top...

stitcheraz

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Kris replied on Mon, Oct 15 2012 3:52 PM

stitcheraz:
Just be sure to test the Frixion on a scrap of YOUR fabric before tracing the design.  On at least some fabrics, there is a "ghost" of the ink after it "disappears".  The ink isn't really gone.

This is what keeps me from using these pens on dark fabric. I used it on a couple blocks and really didn't like seeing those lines after I pressed.

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ls2116 replied on Mon, Oct 15 2012 9:19 PM

thanks for tip .  not sure how i'm going to do my transfer for bluework.

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