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Vivian replied on Wed, May 18 2011 7:06 PM

I have a cookie tin (the type you get at christmas) for all my little stuff.  keeps it right handy and it fits under my clear extension.

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Hope I'm posting this tip correctly and I don't know if anyone else has come up with a similar idea...When I was working on a sampler quilt with each block a different design I wanted some way to make sure I had all my pieces cut out correctly and they looked OK. I had half of a foam core board (you know, the stuff they use for science fair presentations). I split that in half and at an office supply store found hinges that are specifically designed to join that the type of board. I put the hinge in, covered the board with white fleece ( could use felt also) which I attached to the back with hot glue. Now I had a design board the cut pieces would stick to and if I was in the middle of a block and had to put things away, all I did was fold the board at the hinge and everything stayed where it was until I could get started again.

Mary

 

 

 

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Vivian replied on Thu, May 19 2011 10:00 AM

Thats a good one, i'll remember that one.  Science fairs are not in my school life what type of hinges do you use?  most of use use tape etc.

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My tip is for marking your fabric in the Quilt Store when you buy it.  I always have painting tape (Blue Tape) in my purse.  I buy the fabric for my pattern and as soon as it is cut I write on the Painter's Tape what it is for. ...or Fabric A, Fabric B, Fabric C.....and stick it onto the fabric.      Now, when I get home I know exactly what each piece of fabric is for....I get to turn off my brain!

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Hey thats a very good tip, surely I will try and let you know...

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angiejmq replied on Sat, May 21 2011 11:26 AM

I love marking my quilt tops with a chalk pencils, but because they are so fragile, sharpening them can be a challenge.  I've discovered the best tool for sharpening my chalk pencils is a sharpener that you would use to sharpen make up pencils, such as as an eye brow pencil.  The sharpener is designed to work with a more delicate pencil, and I've never had problems with my pencil "lead" breaking as I tried to sharpen it.

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CAS48 replied on Sat, May 21 2011 11:42 AM

Coffee filters make a great template for circle cuts, and can act as stabilizer.  They work great for piece work too!

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Judy Davis replied on Sat, May 21 2011 11:48 AM

I have been quilting for 30 years, and this is unorthodox, but works for me . . . . . rather than make hanging sleeves for wall hangings, I use the "Stapler and Clam Knife" method! 

Position the staples about 5 or 6 inches apart.  Hide the staples between the binding and border, and the clam knife (which has a blunt end) is used in case I need to reposition the staple, as it won't tear the fabric.  This makes a nice flat wall hanging and I have been doing it for years!

 

 

 

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Wow, so many great ideas are here. I have a cat who believes she is a binding expert. When I begin to wind the binding on the paper towel cardboard center, she perks up and comes to help.  As the binding comes off the roller, she grabs it and really increases the tension.  To stop her from helping me so much, I have begun giving her a roller of her own.  I stapled a long strip of assorted selvege and fabrics on a wooden dowel.  Adding some heavy duty fishing swivels to the ends and attaching it to the back of my chair she is content to use it while I sew.  During a sewing break, I re-wind the fabric and she is occupied until the next break.  So far it has not gotten old for her. 

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Why not just finally make up your mind which quilt you are going to do and JUST DO IT!

Barbara Daniels

Houston, Texas

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lilosmom replied on Sat, May 21 2011 2:55 PM

If you have trouble matching points when sewing blocks together, put a small dab of water soluble glue stick on the fabric where the points are to join and press them together. Be sure to put it only on the side where the seam allowance will be. Sew your quarter inch seam, and you will have perfectly matched points! When the quilt gets washed, the glue will wash out.

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Jane replied on Sat, May 21 2011 5:21 PM

Excellent tip.  I do the same with the washable glue when making blocks with curved seams, i.e., drunkards path, New York Beauty, etc.  Three little swipes with the glue stick--one at each point and one in the middle--and I've never had to pin!

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memoose replied on Sun, May 22 2011 2:13 PM

If you like the look of scrappy quilts, but don't have the confidence to pick the colors, just select a dozen fat quarters of fabric collections, and use them. The quilt will always look good if the fabrics look good together.

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Jacquelyn replied on Wed, May 25 2011 7:03 PM

If you use the finger cots to hold the needle when sewing the ones in the cataloges are expensive,  buy them through your medical supply company a gross (144) less then $5.00

shadypast

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Loretta replied on Fri, May 27 2011 12:00 AM

Hopefully I don't duplicate my entry.  I lost everything I typed - due to operator error!!  LOL.

First....I tend to cut out an entire quilt at a time.  I put all pieces into zip-lock bags and label them with sharpies.   All pieces and instructions are then put into "shoe-box" plastic boxes that I have.  (My husband and I were lucky enough to end up with about 100 of them when he was cleaning out a warehouse!).  You could use any type of storage container from a discount store.  I have at least 7 quilts cut out right now.  This way, if I have fabric that I have specifically tagged for a certain quilt - there is no possible chance that I will use it for something else!!  I always try to do one of the pre-cut quilts before I start something new.

Secondly...Regarding cats and cat hair....unfortunately you may think...our cat is not allowed in my sewing room.  Not that I have anything against him, he sleeps on my chest most every night, but, I sew  a lot of baby quilts and I have had experiences where cat allergies have been an issue.  So...my tip...I made a quilt, specifically for the cat and placed it right outside the sewing room door, the cat will lay on that quilt and watch me while I'm sewing.  If he tries to sneak in I send him out.  And also the door to the sewing room stays shut at all other times, so that he cannot get in and get hair on anything.  I can feel comfortable that there is no cat hair on any blankets that I provide to anyone.    And he can get as much cat hair on his quilt as he wants too!!!  So everybody is happy!

 

One quilting project, like one cookie, is never enough.

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