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I have a tip that I improved on. I had saw on the internet fabric folded on to plastic "bolt"s. I wanted to do this but found the plastic bolts expensive for me. So I wanted to use cardboard. I read somewhere to use comic book cardboard. Apparently to preserve your comic book you put it into a archival sleeve with an acid free piece of cardboard. You can buy the cardboard in packs at a comic book store. So I bought some when I went passed a comic book store. I brought them home and found that they were to big for what I wanted so I cut them in half. I then folded all my fabric like so....

and finally I end up with....

I then used a pin to fasten the fabric so it didn't roll off. 

But I didn't like the pin. I would drop it or I feared holes in my fabric. 

So when I was working on a project using inexpensive pony tail holders. 50 for $1 I thought why not try them on this mini bolt? 

And it works great! 

Why did I take the time to do this? 

That is my next tip! 

Jo

thesewinggeek@blogspot.com

 

Jo  theewinggeek

 

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To keep your pin cushion close, put a piece of velcro on the top of your sewing machine and also a piece of the bottom of your pin cushion. Your pin cushion is always near and it pulls off when you need to put your machine away.

Cheryl S. - North Lewisburg, Ohio

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Fall Easy Quilts Magazine tip winner:

To iron small items I made a foldable table from a TV table. I bought an ironing board cover with the padding and using heavy duty staples, stapled the cover to the TV table. It folds up, takes little space and is just right when your working on something that you need to press every time that you sew.

Cheryl S. - North Lewisburg, Oh

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Linny t replied on Wed, Feb 2 2011 6:41 PM

Cheryl S:

To iron small items I made a foldable table from a TV table. I bought an ironing board cover with the padding and using heavy duty staples, stapled the cover to the TV table. It folds up, takes little space and is just right when your working on something that you need to press every time that you sew.

Cheryl S. - North Lewisburg, Oh

 

This is a great idea!  You could use it right next to your sewing machine and then put it up easily when you're not sewing.  Thanks!

Linny T

 

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Liz K replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 12:11 AM

I use a 4' X 8' sheet of styrofoam with a flannel sheet pinned to it for a design wall.  When I need a larger wall I add a second one.  If you use the lighter density white foam which you can buy at Menard's you can also use it without the flannel with a quilt tack gun.  If you have a larger van you can also haul it to your next quilting retreat.  It is very light and easy to carry just be careful if it is a windy day as you may loose it or it could break in a gust. 

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Liz K replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 12:16 AM

When I have scrap pieces of fabric that I am not planning on keeping I cut them into squares for charity quilts.  I start with 6 1/2 inches and go down to 2 1/2 inches by 1/2 inch increments.  When the quilting group I sew with has enough squares of the same size they make 4 patch and nine patch blocks them match them with larger squares to make quilt tops.  Very little fabric is wasted.  What does not get used for the squares I use as a fire starter for our wood stove or I give to a friend who uses long strings to crochet rugs.  One group uses the scraps to stuff pillows for the homeless in the area.

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Sharps trash:  To dispose of your used rotary blades and dull, bent pins and needles, use a chewing gum cannister.  Gum now comes in a "big pak" or cannister that holds 50-60 pieces of gum.  The cannister has a flip top that can be used to pop in the pins and needles, or the top screws off which is perfect for the rotary blades.  Free, but very helpful when disposing of items that potentially can still cut, poke, or jab in the trash.

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gini replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 10:35 AM

hi darby and welcome    thanks for the great tip.  i haven't seen gum in thercanisters, i'll have to look for it   gini

gini in north idaho

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Nana replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 10:37 AM

I keep an empty rotary blade package and write used on it.  As I change blades I put the old ones in the "used" container.  When the container is full I throw it away.

Vinton, Virginia

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February Newsletter Tip Winner:

I'm not sure how "creative" my tip is for this post, but the best way for me to get a project finalized or work completed is for me to be completely and totally organized - which of course, takes time!  I would say the best gift a quilter can give him or herself is to get his or her space completely organized - be ruthless and do whatever it takes to get everything in its place and a place for everything.  That way, while you're working on your "life's work" you can be productive and you can find your tools and fabrics and threads as necessary, without any futile searches and resulting frustration.   Find a space for your fabric - all of your fabric - and store all of your fabric in the same place.  The storage vessel could be a large plastic container or a fabulous under-utilized bookcase or the module-type storage from Ikea, which is great for so many different storage reasons.  If you're lucky enough to have a sewing table, make sure you have all your threads, needles, scissors, bobbins, embroidery machine cards, measuring tape within easy grasp.  Keep a bulletin board behind your sewing space to post great photos that inspire you or projects that you'd like to undertake.  That way, all you do is "spin around" and you see all the great things that give you reason to quilt, quilt, quilt!  Make sure your sewing space is clearly lit, because no one wants to sew in a dark, dingy space.  Your favorite quilting magazines can be stored in the cardboard magazine storage containers that easily line up on a bookshelf for easy retrieval.  Again, those can be purchased, very economically, at Ikea.  An unused trunk or child's toy box can be a fabulous place to store your pillow forms and quilt batt. 

Get organized - take whatever time it takes to do so.  That's my tip!

 

Kim

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That is a great idea,Thanks a lot.

Carla

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Sharon replied on Thu, Feb 3 2011 9:51 PM

February E-newsletter Tip Winner:

I Instead of sewing a few pieces then turning on the iron, or letting it sit on using electricity for long periods of time, I use my plastic point turner to press seams open when piecing. One side is flat and the other is rounded. With my index finger on the flat side, just press it back and forth on the open seam. Later I can press the entire project at one time. This way you don't have to jump up and down and can relax and enjoy sewing. This is also a good way for children to press seams as they learn to sew. There is no chance of them burning themselves on a hot iron.

Toledo, OH

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I found this nifty little box in the Fishing Dept at Wal-mart. It's the perfect placet for storing my presser feet!

Quilters are people who strip so they won't go topless.

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